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For there was never yet philosopher
That could endure the toothache patiently.

      — Much Ado about Nothing, Act V Scene 1

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1-20 of 8,181 total

KEYWORD: you

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# Result number

Work The work is either a play, poem, or sonnet. The sonnets are treated as single work with 154 parts.

Character Indicates who said the line. If it's a play or sonnet, the character name is "Poet."

Line Shows where the line falls within the work.

The numbering is not keyed to any copyrighted numbering system found in a volume of collected works (Arden, Oxford, etc.) The numbering starts at the beginning of the work, and does not restart for each scene.

Text The line's full text, with keywords highlighted within it, unless highlighting has been disabled by the user.

1

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Lafeu

7

You shall find of the king a husband, madam; you,
sir, a father: he that so generally is at all times
good must of necessity hold his virtue to you; whose
worthiness would stir it up where it wanted rather
than lack it where there is such abundance.

2

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Lafeu

24

How called you the man you speak of, madam?

3

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Countess

45

'Tis the best brine a maiden can season her praise
in. The remembrance of her father never approaches
her heart but the tyranny of her sorrows takes all
livelihood from her cheek. No more of this, Helena;
go to, no more; lest it be rather thought you affect
a sorrow than have it.

4

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Bertram

74

[To HELENA] The best wishes that can be forged in
your thoughts be servants to you! Be comfortable
to my mother, your mistress, and make much of her.

5

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Lafeu

77

Farewell, pretty lady: you must hold the credit of
your father.

6

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Parolles

109

Save you, fair queen!

7

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Helena

110

And you, monarch!

8

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Parolles

113

Are you meditating on virginity?

9

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Helena

114

Ay. You have some stain of soldier in you: let me
ask you a question. Man is enemy to virginity; how
may we barricado it against him?

10

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Parolles

121

There is none: man, sitting down before you, will
undermine you and blow you up.

11

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Parolles

126

Virginity being blown down, man will quicklier be
blown up: marry, in blowing him down again, with
the breach yourselves made, you lose your city. It
is not politic in the commonwealth of nature to
preserve virginity. Loss of virginity is rational
increase and there was never virgin got till
virginity was first lost. That you were made of is
metal to make virgins. Virginity by being once lost
may be ten times found; by being ever kept, it is
ever lost: 'tis too cold a companion; away with 't!

12

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Parolles

137

There's little can be said in 't; 'tis against the
rule of nature. To speak on the part of virginity,
is to accuse your mothers; which is most infallible
disobedience. He that hangs himself is a virgin:
virginity murders itself and should be buried in
highways out of all sanctified limit, as a desperate
offendress against nature. Virginity breeds mites,
much like a cheese; consumes itself to the very
paring, and so dies with feeding his own stomach.
Besides, virginity is peevish, proud, idle, made of
self-love, which is the most inhibited sin in the
canon. Keep it not; you cannot choose but loose
by't: out with 't! within ten year it will make
itself ten, which is a goodly increase; and the
principal itself not much the worse: away with 't!

13

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Parolles

153

Let me see: marry, ill, to like him that ne'er it
likes. 'Tis a commodity will lose the gloss with
lying; the longer kept, the less worth: off with 't
while 'tis vendible; answer the time of request.
Virginity, like an old courtier, wears her cap out
of fashion: richly suited, but unsuitable: just
like the brooch and the tooth-pick, which wear not
now. Your date is better in your pie and your
porridge than in your cheek; and your virginity,
your old virginity, is like one of our French
withered pears, it looks ill, it eats drily; marry,
'tis a withered pear; it was formerly better;
marry, yet 'tis a withered pear: will you anything with it?

14

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Page

189

Monsieur Parolles, my lord calls for you.

15

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Helena

193

Monsieur Parolles, you were born under a charitable star.

16

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Helena

197

The wars have so kept you under that you must needs
be born under Mars.

17

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Parolles

201

Why think you so?

18

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Helena

202

You go so much backward when you fight.

19

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 1]

Helena

204

So is running away, when fear proposes the safety;
but the composition that your valour and fear makes
in you is a virtue of a good wing, and I like the wear well.

20

All's Well That Ends Well
[I, 2]

Second Lord

310

You are loved, sir:
They that least lend it you shall lack you first.

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