Speeches (Lines) for Junius Brutus
in "Coriolanus"

Total: 91

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,276

He has no equal.

2

I,1,278

Mark'd you his lip and eyes?

3

I,1,280

Being moved, he will not spare to gird the gods.

4

I,1,282

The present wars devour him: he is grown
Too proud to be so valiant.

5

I,1,289

Fame, at the which he aims,
In whom already he's well graced, can not...

6

I,1,300

Come:
Half all Cominius' honours are to CORIOLANUS....

7

I,1,309

Lets along.

8

II,1,919

Good or bad?

9

II,1,927

He's a lamb indeed, that baes like a bear.

10

II,1,933

He's poor in no one fault, but stored with all.

11

II,1,935

And topping all others in boasting.

12

II,1,948

We do it not alone, sir.

13

II,1,956

What then, sir?

14

II,1,981

Come, sir, come, we know you well enough.

15

II,1,996

Come, come, you are well understood to be a
perfecter giber for the table than a necessary...

16

II,1,1143

All tongues speak of him, and the bleared sights
Are spectacled to see him: your prattling nurse...

17

II,1,1162

Then our office may,
During his power, go sleep.

18

II,1,1167

In that there's comfort.

19

II,1,1174

I heard him swear,
Were he to stand for consul, never would he...

20

II,1,1181

It was his word: O, he would miss it rather
Than carry it but by the suit of the gentry to him,...

21

II,1,1187

'Tis most like he will.

22

II,1,1190

So it must fall out
To him or our authorities. For an end,...

23

II,1,1209

What's the matter?

24

II,1,1219

Let's to the Capitol;
And carry with us ears and eyes for the time,...

25

II,2,1292

Which the rather
We shall be blest to do, if he remember...

26

II,2,1299

Most willingly;
But yet my caution was more pertinent...

27

II,2,1312

Sir, I hope
My words disbench'd you not.

28

II,2,1405

Mark you that?

29

II,2,1416

You see how he intends to use the people.

30

II,2,1420

Come, we'll inform them
Of our proceedings here: on the marketplace,...

31

II,3,1589

We stay here for the people.

32

II,3,1594

With a proud heart he wore his humble weeds.
will you dismiss the people?

33

II,3,1599

We pray the gods he may deserve your loves.

34

II,3,1623

Could you not have told him
As you were lesson'd, when he had no power,...

35

II,3,1648

Did you perceive
He did solicit you in free contempt...

36

II,3,1663

Get you hence instantly, and tell those friends,
They have chose a consul that will from them take...

37

II,3,1678

Lay
A fault on us, your tribunes; that we laboured,...

38

II,3,1688

Ay, spare us not. Say we read lectures to you.
How youngly he began to serve his country,...

39

II,3,1706

Say, you ne'er had done't—
Harp on that still—but by our putting on;...

40

II,3,1713

Let them go on;
This mutiny were better put in hazard,...

41

III,1,1758

It will be dangerous to go on: no further.

42

III,1,1762

Cominius, no.

43

III,1,1765

The people are incensed against him.

44

III,1,1779

Call't not a plot:
The people cry you mock'd them, and of late,...

45

III,1,1785

Not to them all.

46

III,1,1787

How! I inform them!

47

III,1,1789

Not unlike,
Each way, to better yours.

48

III,1,1829

You speak o' the people,
As if you were a god to punish, not...

49

III,1,1876

Why, shall the people give
One that speaks thus their voice?

50

III,1,1900

Enough, with over-measure.

51

III,1,1924

Has said enough.

52

III,1,1935

Manifest treason!

53

III,1,1937

The aediles, ho!
[Enter an AEdile]...

54

III,1,1956

Seize him, AEdiles!

55

III,1,1978

By the consent of all, we were establish'd
The people's magistrates.

56

III,1,1987

Or let us stand to our authority,
Or let us lose it. We do here pronounce,...

57

III,1,1995

AEdiles, seize him!

58

III,1,2004

Sir, those cold ways,
That seem like prudent helps, are very poisonous...

59

III,1,2013

Lay hands upon him.

60

III,1,2091

He consul!

61

III,1,2119

Merely awry: when he did love his country,
It honour'd him.

62

III,1,2124

We'll hear no more.
Pursue him to his house, and pluck him thence:...

63

III,1,2134

If it were so,—

64

III,1,2152

Go not home.

65

III,3,2341

In this point charge him home, that he affects
Tyrannical power: if he evade us there,...

66

III,3,2349

How accompanied?

67

III,3,2366

And when such time they have begun to cry,
Let them not cease, but with a din confused...

68

III,3,2373

Go about it.
[Exit AEdile]...

69

III,3,2448

But since he hath
Served well for Rome,—

70

III,3,2451

I talk of that, that know it.

71

III,3,2488

There's no more to be said, but he is banish'd,
As enemy to the people and his country:...

72

IV,2,2591

Now we have shown our power,
Let us seem humbler after it is done...

73

IV,2,2597

Dismiss them home.
[Exit AEdile]...

74

IV,2,2601

Why?

75

IV,2,2603

They have ta'en note of us: keep on your way.

76

IV,2,2634

I would he had.

77

IV,2,2639

Pray, let us go.

78

IV,2,2646

Well, well, we'll leave you.

79

IV,6,3015

We stood to't in good time.
[Enter MENENIUS]...

80

IV,6,3033

God-den to you all, god-den to you all.

81

IV,6,3037

Farewell, kind neighbours: we wish'd Coriolanus
Had loved you as we did.

82

IV,6,3045

Caius CORIOLANUS was
A worthy officer i' the war; but insolent,...

83

IV,6,3054

The gods have well prevented it, and Rome
Sits safe and still without him.

84

IV,6,3070

Go see this rumourer whipp'd. It cannot be
The Volsces dare break with us.

85

IV,6,3082

Not possible.

86

IV,6,3100

Raised only, that the weaker sort may wish
Good CORIOLANUS home again.

87

IV,6,3142

But is this true, sir?

88

IV,6,3210

I do not like this news.

89

IV,6,3212

Let's to the Capitol. Would half my wealth
Would buy this for a lie!

90

V,1,3324

Only make trial what your love can do
For Rome, towards CORIOLANUS.

91

V,1,3346

You know the very road into his kindness,
And cannot lose your way.

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