Speeches (Lines) for Achilles
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 74

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,912

Why, how now, Ajax! wherefore do you thus? How now,
Thersites! what's the matter, man?

2

II,1,915

Ay; what's the matter?

3

II,1,917

So I do: what's the matter?

4

II,1,919

'Well!' why, I do so.

5

II,1,922

I know that, fool.

6

II,1,933

What?

7

II,1,936

Nay, good Ajax.

8

II,1,938

Nay, I must hold you.

9

II,1,941

Peace, fool!

10

II,1,945

Will you set your wit to a fool's?

11

II,1,948

What's the quarrel?

12

II,1,954

Your last service was sufferance, 'twas not
voluntary: no man is beaten voluntary: Ajax was...

13

II,1,961

What, with me too, Thersites?

14

II,1,965

What, what?

15

II,1,972

There's for you, Patroclus.

16

II,1,978

Marry, this, sir, is proclaim'd through all our host:
That Hector, by the fifth hour of the sun,...

17

II,1,985

I know not: 'tis put to lottery; otherwise
He knew his man.

18

II,3,1252

Who's there?

19

II,3,1254

Where, where? Art thou come? why, my cheese, my
digestion, why hast thou not served thyself in to...

20

II,3,1264

O, tell, tell.

21

II,3,1270

He is a privileged man. Proceed, Thersites.

22

II,3,1273

Derive this; come.

23

II,3,1281

Patroclus, I'll speak with nobody.
Come in with me, Thersites.

24

III,3,1923

What, comes the general to speak with me?
You know my mind, I'll fight no more 'gainst Troy.

25

III,3,1927

No.

26

III,3,1931

Good day, good day.

27

III,3,1934

What, does the cuckold scorn me?

28

III,3,1936

Good morrow, Ajax.

29

III,3,1938

Good morrow.

30

III,3,1941

What mean these fellows? Know they not Achilles?

31

III,3,1946

What, am I poor of late?
'Tis certain, greatness, once fall'n out with fortune,...

32

III,3,1968

What are you reading?

33

III,3,1977

This is not strange, Ulysses.
The beauty that is borne here in the face...

34

III,3,2018

I do believe it; for they pass'd by me
As misers do by beggars, neither gave to me...

35

III,3,2068

Of this my privacy
I have strong reasons.

36

III,3,2074

Ha! known!

37

III,3,2107

Shall Ajax fight with Hector?

38

III,3,2109

I see my reputation is at stake
My fame is shrewdly gored.

39

III,3,2117

Go call Thersites hither, sweet Patroclus:
I'll send the fool to Ajax and desire him...

40

III,3,2128

What?

41

III,3,2130

How so?

42

III,3,2134

How can that be?

43

III,3,2150

Thou must be my ambassador to him, Thersites.

44

III,3,2156

To him, Patroclus; tell him I humbly desire the
valiant Ajax to invite the most valorous Hector...

45

III,3,2181

Why, but he is not in this tune, is he?

46

III,3,2186

Come, thou shalt bear a letter to him straight.

47

III,3,2189

My mind is troubled, like a fountain stirr'd;
And I myself see not the bottom of it.

48

IV,5,2609

'Tis but early days.

49

IV,5,2623

I'll take what winter from your lips, fair lady:
Achilles bids you welcome.

50

IV,5,2684

'Tis done like Hector; but securely done,
A little proudly, and great deal misprizing...

51

IV,5,2689

If not Achilles, nothing.

52

IV,5,2700

A maiden battle, then? O, I perceive you.

53

IV,5,2856

I shall forestall thee, Lord Ulysses, thou!
Now, Hector, I have fed mine eyes on thee;...

54

IV,5,2861

I am Achilles.

55

IV,5,2863

Behold thy fill.

56

IV,5,2865

Thou art too brief: I will the second time,
As I would buy thee, view thee limb by limb.

57

IV,5,2870

Tell me, you heavens, in which part of his body
Shall I destroy him? whether there, or there, or there?...

58

IV,5,2880

I tell thee, yea.

59

IV,5,2899

Dost thou entreat me, Hector?
To-morrow do I meet thee, fell as death;...

60

V,1,2930

I'll heat his blood with Greekish wine to-night,
Which with my scimitar I'll cool to-morrow....

61

V,1,2935

How now, thou core of envy!
Thou crusty batch of nature, what's the news?

62

V,1,2939

From whence, fragment?

63

V,1,2967

My sweet Patroclus, I am thwarted quite
From my great purpose in to-morrow's battle....

64

V,1,3008

Welcome, brave Hector; welcome, princes all.

65

V,1,3016

Good night and welcome, both at once, to those
That go or tarry.

66

V,1,3020

Old Nestor tarries; and you too, Diomed,
Keep Hector company an hour or two.

67

V,1,3031

Come, come, enter my tent.

68

V,5,3506

Where is this Hector?
Come, come, thou boy-queller, show thy face;...

69

V,6,3530

Now do I see thee, ha! have at thee, Hector!

70

V,6,3532

I do disdain thy courtesy, proud Trojan:
Be happy that my arms are out of use:...

71

V,7,3557

Come here about me, you my Myrmidons;
Mark what I say. Attend me where I wheel:...

72

V,8,3595

Look, Hector, how the sun begins to set;
How ugly night comes breathing at his heels:...

73

V,8,3600

Strike, fellows, strike; this is the man I seek.
[HECTOR falls]...

74

V,8,3609

The dragon wing of night o'erspreads the earth,
And, stickler-like, the armies separates....

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