Speeches (Lines) for Aeneas
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 44

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,136

How now, Prince Troilus! wherefore not afield?

2

I,1,140

That Paris is returned home and hurt.

3

I,1,142

Troilus, by Menelaus.

4

I,1,146

Hark, what good sport is out of town to-day!

5

I,1,149

In all swift haste.

6

I,3,671

Is this great Agamemnon's tent, I pray you?

7

I,3,673

May one, that is a herald and a prince,
Do a fair message to his kingly ears?

8

I,3,678

Fair leave and large security. How may
A stranger to those most imperial looks...

9

I,3,682

Ay;
I ask, that I might waken reverence,...

10

I,3,691

Courtiers as free, as debonair, unarm'd,
As bending angels; that's their fame in peace:...

11

I,3,704

Ay, Greek, that is my name.

12

I,3,706

Sir, pardon; 'tis for Agamemnon's ears.

13

I,3,708

Nor I from Troy come not to whisper him:
I bring a trumpet to awake his ear,...

14

I,3,716

Trumpet, blow loud,
Send thy brass voice through all these lazy tents;...

15

I,3,763

Now heavens forbid such scarcity of youth!

16

IV,1,2201

Is the prince there in person?
Had I so good occasion to lie long...

17

IV,1,2210

Health to you, valiant sir,
During all question of the gentle truce;...

18

IV,1,2219

And thou shalt hunt a lion, that will fly
With his face backward. In humane gentleness,...

19

IV,1,2230

We know each other well.

20

IV,1,2235

I was sent for to the king; but why, I know not.

21

IV,1,2246

That I assure you:
Troilus had rather Troy were borne to Greece...

22

IV,1,2252

Good morrow, all.

23

IV,2,2340

Good morrow, lord, good morrow.

24

IV,2,2343

Is not Prince Troilus here?

25

IV,2,2345

Come, he is here, my lord; do not deny him:
It doth import him much to speak with me.

26

IV,2,2350

Who!—nay, then: come, come, you'll do him wrong
ere you're ware: you'll be so true to him, to be...

27

IV,2,2356

My lord, I scarce have leisure to salute you,
My matter is so rash: there is at hand...

28

IV,2,2365

By Priam and the general state of Troy:
They are at hand and ready to effect it.

29

IV,2,2370

Good, good, my lord; the secrets of nature
Have not more gift in taciturnity.

30

IV,4,2479

[Within] My lord, is the lady ready?

31

IV,4,2532

[Within] Nay, good my lord,—

32

IV,4,2583

How have we spent this morning!
The prince must think me tardy and remiss,...

33

IV,4,2588

Yea, with a bridegroom's fresh alacrity,
Let us address to tend on Hector's heels:...

34

IV,5,2675

Hail, all you state of Greece! what shall be done
To him that victory commands? or do you purpose...

35

IV,5,2683

He cares not; he'll obey conditions.

36

IV,5,2687

If not Achilles, sir,
What is your name?

37

IV,5,2690

Therefore Achilles: but, whate'er, know this:
In the extremity of great and little,...

38

IV,5,2736

Princes, enough, so please you.

39

IV,5,2767

There is expectance here from both the sides,
What further you will do.

40

IV,5,2800

The noble Menelaus.

41

IV,5,2825

'Tis the old Nestor.

42

V,2,3258

I have been seeking you this hour, my lord:
Hector, by this, is arming him in Troy;...

43

V,10,3632

Stand, ho! yet are we masters of the field:
Never go home; here starve we out the night.

44

V,10,3643

My lord, you do discomfort all the host!

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