Speeches (Lines) for Ajax
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 55

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,858

Thersites!

2

II,1,861

Thersites!

3

II,1,864

Dog!

4

II,1,866

Thou bitch-wolf's son, canst thou not hear?
[Beating him]...

5

II,1,871

Speak then, thou vinewedst leaven, speak: I will
beat thee into handsomeness.

6

II,1,877

Toadstool, learn me the proclamation.

7

II,1,879

The proclamation!

8

II,1,881

Do not, porpentine, do not: my fingers itch.

9

II,1,886

I say, the proclamation!

10

II,1,891

Mistress Thersites!

11

II,1,893

Cobloaf!

12

II,1,896

[Beating him] You whoreson cur!

13

II,1,898

Thou stool for a witch!

14

II,1,907

You dog!

15

II,1,909

[Beating him] You cur!

16

II,1,924

Therefore I beat thee.

17

II,1,944

O thou damned cur! I shall—

18

II,1,949

I bade the vile owl go learn me the tenor of the
proclamation, and he rails upon me.

19

II,1,952

Well, go to, go to.

20

II,1,967

I shall cut out your tongue.

21

II,1,984

Farewell. Who shall answer him?

22

II,1,987

O, meaning you. I will go learn more of it.

23

II,3,1303

Yes, lion-sick, sick of proud heart: you may call it
melancholy, if you will favour the man; but, by my...

24

II,3,1363

What is he more than another?

25

II,3,1365

Is he so much? Do you not think he thinks himself a
better man than I am?

26

II,3,1368

Will you subscribe his thought, and say he is?

27

II,3,1372

Why should a man be proud? How doth pride grow? I
know not what pride is.

28

II,3,1379

I do hate a proud man, as I hate the engendering of toads.

29

II,3,1426

If I go to him, with my armed fist I'll pash him o'er the face.

30

II,3,1428

An a' be proud with me, I'll pheeze his pride:
Let me go to him.

31

II,3,1431

A paltry, insolent fellow!

32

II,3,1433

Can he not be sociable?

33

II,3,1435

I'll let his humours blood.

34

II,3,1437

An all men were o' my mind,—

35

II,3,1439

A' should not bear it so, a' should eat swords first:
shall pride carry it?

36

II,3,1443

I will knead him; I'll make him supple.

37

II,3,1455

A whoreson dog, that shall pelter thus with us!
Would he were a Trojan!

38

II,3,1479

Shall I call you father?

39

III,3,1935

How now, Patroclus!

40

III,3,1937

Ha?

41

III,3,1939

Ay, and good next day too.

42

IV,5,2601

Thou, trumpet, there's my purse.
Now crack thy lungs, and split thy brazen pipe:...

43

IV,5,2737

I am not warm yet; let us fight again.

44

IV,5,2759

I thank thee, Hector
Thou art too gentle and too free a man:...

45

IV,5,2771

If I might in entreaties find success—
As seld I have the chance—I would desire...

46

IV,5,2781

Great Agamemnon comes to meet us here.

47

IV,5,2890

Do not chafe thee, cousin:
And you, Achilles, let these threats alone,...

48

V,1,3002

No, yonder 'tis;
There, where we see the lights.

49

V,1,3005

No, not a whit.

50

V,5,3501

Troilus! thou coward Troilus!

51

V,6,3512

Troilus, thou coward Troilus, show thy head!

52

V,6,3515

What wouldst thou?

53

V,6,3517

Were I the general, thou shouldst have my office
Ere that correction. Troilus, I say! what, Troilus!

54

V,6,3523

I'll fight with him alone: stand, Diomed.

55

V,9,3624

If it be so, yet bragless let it be;
Great Hector was a man as good as he.

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