Speeches (Lines) for Arviragus
in "Cymbeline"

Total: 46

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,3,1612

Hail, heaven!

2

III,3,1639

What should we speak of
When we are old as you? when we shall hear...

3

III,6,2184

I am weak with toil, yet strong in appetite.

4

III,6,2206

All gold and silver rather turn to dirt!
As 'tis no better reckon'd, but of those...

5

III,6,2228

I'll make't my comfort
He is a man; I'll love him as my brother:...

6

III,6,2242

Or I, whate'er it be,
What pain it cost, what danger. God's!

7

III,6,2260

The night to the owl and morn to the lark
less welcome.

8

III,6,2263

I pray, draw near.

9

IV,2,2318

[To IMOGEN]. Brother, stay here
Are we not brothers?

10

IV,2,2338

If it be sin to say so, I yoke me
In my good brother's fault: I know not why...

11

IV,2,2351

Brother, farewell.

12

IV,2,2353

You health. So please you, sir.

13

IV,2,2366

Thus did he answer me: yet said, hereafter
I might know more.

14

IV,2,2370

We'll not be long away.

15

IV,2,2379

How angel-like he sings!

16

IV,2,2384

Nobly he yokes
A smiling with a sigh, as if the sigh...

17

IV,2,2393

Grow, patience!
And let the stinking elder, grief, untwine...

18

IV,2,2457

None in the world: you did mistake him, sure.

19

IV,2,2463

In this place we left them:
I wish my brother make good time with him,...

20

IV,2,2507

Let ordinance
Come as the gods foresay it: howsoe'er,...

21

IV,2,2523

Would I had done't
So the revenge alone pursued me! Polydore,...

22

IV,2,2535

Poor sick Fidele!
I'll weringly to him: to gain his colour...

23

IV,2,2577

The bird is dead
That we have made so much on. I had rather...

24

IV,2,2592

Stark, as you see:
Thus smiling, as some fly hid tickled slumber,...

25

IV,2,2598

O' the floor;
His arms thus leagued: I thought he slept, and put...

26

IV,2,2606

With fairest flowers
Whilst summer lasts and I live here, Fidele,...

27

IV,2,2623

Say, where shall's lay him?

28

IV,2,2625

Be't so:
And let us, Polydore, though now our voices...

29

IV,2,2634

We'll speak it, then.

30

IV,2,2648

If you'll go fetch him,
We'll say our song the whilst. Brother, begin.

31

IV,2,2653

'Tis true.

32

IV,2,2655

So. Begin.

33

IV,2,2663

Fear no more the frown o' the great;
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke;...

34

IV,2,2670

Nor the all-dreaded thunder-stone;

35

IV,2,2672

Thou hast finish'd joy and moan:

36

IV,2,2676

Nor no witchcraft charm thee!

37

IV,2,2678

Nothing ill come near thee!

38

IV,4,2885

What pleasure, sir, find we in life, to lock it
From action and adventure?

39

IV,4,2903

It is not likely
That when they hear the Roman horses neigh,...

40

IV,4,2924

By this sun that shines,
I'll thither: what thing is it that I never...

41

IV,4,2939

So say I. amen.

42

V,5,3514

One sand another
Not more resembles that sweet rosy lad...

43

V,5,3749

In that he spake too far.

44

V,5,3756

Your danger's ours.

45

V,5,3835

Ay, my good lord.

46

V,5,3890

You holp us, sir,
As you did mean indeed to be our brother;...

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