Speeches (Lines) for Cloten
in "Cymbeline"

Total: 77

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,239

If my shirt were bloody, then to shift it. Have I hurt him?

2

I,2,245

The villain would not stand me.

3

I,2,250

I would they had not come between us.

4

I,2,253

And that she should love this fellow and refuse me!

5

I,2,261

Come, I'll to my chamber. Would there had been some
hurt done!

6

I,2,265

You'll go with us?

7

I,2,267

Nay, come, let's go together.

8

II,1,851

Was there ever man had such luck! when I kissed the
jack, upon an up-cast to be hit away! I had a...

9

II,1,860

When a gentleman is disposed to swear, it is not for
any standers-by to curtail his oaths, ha?

10

II,1,865

Whoreson dog! I give him satisfaction?
Would he had been one of my rank!

11

II,1,868

I am not vexed more at any thing in the earth: a
pox on't! I had rather not be so noble as I am;...

12

II,1,876

Sayest thou?

13

II,1,879

No, I know that: but it is fit I should commit
offence to my inferiors.

14

II,1,882

Why, so I say.

15

II,1,884

A stranger, and I not know on't!

16

II,1,889

Leonatus! a banished rascal; and he's another,
whatsoever he be. Who told you of this stranger?

17

II,1,892

Is it fit I went to look upon him? is there no
derogation in't?

18

II,1,895

Not easily, I think.

19

II,1,898

Come, I'll go see this Italian: what I have lost
to-day at bowls I'll win to-night of him. Come, go.

20

II,3,980

It would make any man cold to lose.

21

II,3,983

Winning will put any man into courage. If I could
get this foolish Imogen, I should have gold enough....

22

II,3,987

I would this music would come: I am advised to give
her music o' mornings; they say it will penetrate....

23

II,3,1006

So, get you gone. If this penetrate, I will
consider your music the better: if it do not, it is...

24

II,3,1013

I am glad I was up so late; for that's the reason I
was up so early: he cannot choose but take this...

25

II,3,1020

I have assailed her with music, but she vouchsafes no notice.

26

II,3,1035

Senseless! not so.

27

II,3,1049

If she be up, I'll speak with her; if not,
Let her lie still and dream....

28

II,3,1067

A gentleman.

29

II,3,1069

Yes, and a gentlewoman's son.

30

II,3,1073

Your lady's person: is she ready?

31

II,3,1076

There is gold for you;
Sell me your good report.

32

II,3,1081

Good morrow, fairest: sister, your sweet hand.

33

II,3,1087

Still, I swear I love you.

34

II,3,1091

This is no answer.

35

II,3,1097

To leave you in your madness, 'twere my sin:
I will not.

36

II,3,1100

Do you call me fool?

37

II,3,1111

You sin against
Obedience, which you owe your father. For...

38

II,3,1133

The south-fog rot him!

39

II,3,1140

'His garment!' Now the devil—

40

II,3,1142

'His garment!'

41

II,3,1156

You have abused me:
'His meanest garment!'

42

II,3,1160

I will inform your father.

43

II,3,1166

I'll be revenged:
'His meanest garment!' Well.

44

III,1,1423

There be many Caesars,
Ere such another Julius. Britain is...

45

III,1,1446

Come, there's no more tribute to be paid: our
kingdom is stronger than it was at that time; and,...

46

III,1,1452

We have yet many among us can gripe as hard as
Cassibelan: I do not say I am one; but I have a...

47

III,1,1467

[with Lords] We do.

48

III,1,1495

His majesty bids you welcome. Make
pastime with us a day or two, or longer: if...

49

III,5,1961

Receive it friendly; but from this time forth
I wear it as your enemy.

50

III,5,1970

'Tis all the better;
Your valiant Britons have their wishes in it.

51

III,5,2014

That man of hers, Pisanio, her old servant,
have not seen these two days.

52

III,5,2030

'Tis certain she is fled.
Go in and cheer the king: he rages; none...

53

III,5,2036

I love and hate her: for she's fair and royal,
And that she hath all courtly parts more exquisite...

54

III,5,2052

Where is thy lady? Or, by Jupiter,—
I will not ask again. Close villain,...

55

III,5,2061

Where is she, sir? Come nearer;
No further halting: satisfy me home...

56

III,5,2065

All-worthy villain!
Discover where thy mistress is at once,...

57

III,5,2074

Let's see't. I will pursue her
Even to Augustus' throne.

58

III,5,2079

Hum!

59

III,5,2082

Sirrah, is this letter true?

60

III,5,2084

It is Posthumus' hand; I know't. Sirrah, if thou
wouldst not be a villain, but do me true service,...

61

III,5,2093

Wilt thou serve me? for since patiently and
constantly thou hast stuck to the bare fortune of...

62

III,5,2099

Give me thy hand; here's my purse. Hast any of thy
late master's garments in thy possession?

63

III,5,2103

The first service thou dost me, fetch that suit
hither: let it be thy lint service; go.

64

III,5,2107

Meet thee at Milford-Haven!—I forgot to ask him one
thing; I'll remember't anon:—even there, thou...

65

III,5,2127

How long is't since she went to Milford-Haven?

66

III,5,2129

Bring this apparel to my chamber; that is the second
thing that I have commanded thee: the third is,...

67

IV,1,2287

I am near to the place where they should meet, if
Pisanio have mapped it truly. How fit his garments...

68

IV,2,2399

I cannot find those runagates; that villain
Hath mock'd me. I am faint.

69

IV,2,2410

Soft! What are you
That fly me thus? some villain mountaineers?...

70

IV,2,2416

Thou art a robber,
A law-breaker, a villain: yield thee, thief.

71

IV,2,2423

Thou villain base,
Know'st me not by my clothes?

72

IV,2,2428

Thou precious varlet,
My tailor made them not.

73

IV,2,2433

Thou injurious thief,
Hear but my name, and tremble.

74

IV,2,2436

Cloten, thou villain.

75

IV,2,2441

To thy further fear,
Nay, to thy mere confusion, thou shalt know...

76

IV,2,2446

Art not afeard?

77

IV,2,2449

Die the death:
When I have slain thee with my proper hand,...

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