Speeches (Lines) for Cressida
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 152

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,153

Who were those went by?

2

I,2,155

And whither go they?

3

I,2,166

What was his cause of anger?

4

I,2,170

Good; and what of him?

5

I,2,173

So do all men, unless they are drunk, sick, or have no legs.

6

I,2,186

But how should this man, that makes
me smile, make Hector angry?

7

I,2,191

Who comes here?

8

I,2,194

Hector's a gallant man.

9

I,2,197

Good morrow, uncle Pandarus.

10

I,2,201

This morning, uncle.

11

I,2,205

Hector was gone, but Helen was not up.

12

I,2,207

That were we talking of, and of his anger.

13

I,2,209

So he says here.

14

I,2,214

What, is he angry too?

15

I,2,216

O Jupiter! there's no comparison.

16

I,2,219

Ay, if I ever saw him before and knew him.

17

I,2,221

Then you say as I say; for, I am sure, he is not Hector.

18

I,2,223

'Tis just to each of them; he is himself.

19

I,2,225

So he is.

20

I,2,227

He is not Hector.

21

I,2,232

Excuse me.

22

I,2,234

Pardon me, pardon me.

23

I,2,238

He shall not need it, if he have his own.

24

I,2,240

No matter.

25

I,2,242

'Twould not become him; his own's better.

26

I,2,247

No, but brown.

27

I,2,249

To say the truth, true and not true.

28

I,2,251

Why, Paris hath colour enough.

29

I,2,253

Then Troilus should have too much: if she praised
him above, his complexion is higher than his; he...

30

I,2,260

Then she's a merry Greek indeed.

31

I,2,264

Indeed, a tapster's arithmetic may soon bring his
particulars therein to a total.

32

I,2,268

Is he so young a man and so old a lifter?

33

I,2,271

Juno have mercy! how came it cloven?

34

I,2,274

O, he smiles valiantly.

35

I,2,276

O yes, an 'twere a cloud in autumn.

36

I,2,279

Troilus will stand to the proof, if you'll
prove it so.

37

I,2,283

If you love an addle egg as well as you love an idle
head, you would eat chickens i' the shell.

38

I,2,288

Without the rack.

39

I,2,290

Alas, poor chin! many a wart is richer.

40

I,2,293

With mill-stones.

41

I,2,295

But there was more temperate fire under the pot of
her eyes: did her eyes run o'er too?

42

I,2,298

At what was all this laughing?

43

I,2,300

An't had been a green hair, I should have laughed
too.

44

I,2,303

What was his answer?

45

I,2,306

This is her question.

46

I,2,315

So let it now; for it has been while going by.

47

I,2,317

So I do.

48

I,2,320

And I'll spring up in his tears, an 'twere a nettle
against May.

49

I,2,326

At your pleasure.

50

I,2,330

Speak not so loud.

51

I,2,336

Who's that?

52

I,2,342

Will he give you the nod?

53

I,2,344

If he do, the rich shall have more.

54

I,2,350

O, a brave man!

55

I,2,356

Be those with swords?

56

I,2,367

Who's that?

57

I,2,370

Can Helenus fight, uncle?

58

I,2,374

What sneaking fellow comes yonder?

59

I,2,379

Peace, for shame, peace!

60

I,2,389

Here come more.

61

I,2,397

There is among the Greeks Achilles, a better man than Troilus.

62

I,2,399

Well, well.

63

I,2,405

Ay, a minced man: and then to be baked with no date
in the pie, for then the man's date's out.

64

I,2,409

Upon my back, to defend my belly; upon my wit, to
defend my wiles; upon my secrecy, to defend mine...

65

I,2,415

Nay, I'll watch you for that; and that's one of the
chiefest of them too: if I cannot ward what I would...

66

I,2,428

Adieu, uncle.

67

I,2,430

To bring, uncle?

68

I,2,432

By the same token, you are a bawd.
[Exit PANDARUS]...

69

III,2,1714

Will you walk in, my lord?

70

III,2,1716

Wished, my lord! The gods grant,—O my lord!

71

III,2,1720

More dregs than water, if my fears have eyes.

72

III,2,1722

Blind fear, that seeing reason leads, finds safer
footing than blind reason stumbling without fear: to...

73

III,2,1727

Nor nothing monstrous neither?

74

III,2,1735

They say all lovers swear more performance than they
are able and yet reserve an ability that they never...

75

III,2,1750

Will you walk in, my lord?

76

III,2,1753

Well, uncle, what folly I commit, I dedicate to you.

77

III,2,1763

Boldness comes to me now, and brings me heart.
Prince Troilus, I have loved you night and day...

78

III,2,1767

Hard to seem won: but I was won, my lord,
With the first glance that ever—pardon me—...

79

III,2,1786

My lord, I do beseech you, pardon me;
'Twas not my purpose, thus to beg a kiss:...

80

III,2,1792

Pray you, content you.

81

III,2,1794

Sir, mine own company.

82

III,2,1796

Let me go and try:
I have a kind of self resides with you;...

83

III,2,1802

Perchance, my lord, I show more craft than love;
And fell so roundly to a large confession,...

84

III,2,1820

In that I'll war with you.

85

III,2,1834

Prophet may you be!
If I be false, or swerve a hair from truth,...

86

III,2,1857

Amen.

87

IV,2,2287

Then, sweet my lord, I'll call mine uncle down;
He shall unbolt the gates.

88

IV,2,2293

Good morrow, then.

89

IV,2,2295

Are you a-weary of me?

90

IV,2,2300

Night hath been too brief.

91

IV,2,2305

Prithee, tarry:
You men will never tarry....

92

IV,2,2312

A pestilence on him! now will he be mocking:
I shall have such a life!

93

IV,2,2317

Go hang yourself, you naughty mocking uncle!
You bring me to do, and then you flout me too.

94

IV,2,2321

Come, come, beshrew your heart! you'll ne'er be good,
Nor suffer others.

95

IV,2,2326

Did not I tell you? Would he were knock'd i' the head!
[Knocking within]...

96

IV,2,2332

Come, you are deceived, I think of no such thing.
[Knocking within]...

97

IV,2,2377

How now! what's the matter? who was here?

98

IV,2,2379

Why sigh you so profoundly? where's my lord? gone!
Tell me, sweet uncle, what's the matter?

99

IV,2,2382

O the gods! what's the matter?

100

IV,2,2386

Good uncle, I beseech you, on my knees! beseech you,
what's the matter?

101

IV,2,2392

O you immortal gods! I will not go.

102

IV,2,2394

I will not, uncle: I have forgot my father;
I know no touch of consanguinity;...

103

IV,2,2405

Tear my bright hair and scratch my praised cheeks,
Crack my clear voice with sobs and break my heart...

104

IV,4,2428

Why tell you me of moderation?
The grief is fine, full, perfect, that I taste,...

105

IV,4,2440

O Troilus! Troilus!

106

IV,4,2456

Have the gods envy?

107

IV,4,2458

And is it true that I must go from Troy?

108

IV,4,2460

What, and from Troilus too?

109

IV,4,2462

Is it possible?

110

IV,4,2486

I must then to the Grecians?

111

IV,4,2488

A woful Cressid 'mongst the merry Greeks!
When shall we see again?

112

IV,4,2491

I true! how now! what wicked deem is this?

113

IV,4,2500

O, you shall be exposed, my lord, to dangers
As infinite as imminent! but I'll be true.

114

IV,4,2503

And you this glove. When shall I see you?

115

IV,4,2507

O heavens! 'be true' again!

116

IV,4,2516

O heavens! you love me not.

117

IV,4,2526

Do you think I will?

118

IV,4,2537

My lord, will you be true?

119

IV,5,2636

In kissing, do you render or receive?

120

IV,5,2638

I'll make my match to live,
The kiss you take is better than you give;...

121

IV,5,2642

You're an odd man; give even or give none.

122

IV,5,2644

No, Paris is not; for you know 'tis true,
That you are odd, and he is even with you.

123

IV,5,2647

No, I'll be sworn.

124

IV,5,2650

You may.

125

IV,5,2652

Why, beg, then.

126

IV,5,2655

I am your debtor, claim it when 'tis due.

127

V,2,3056

Now, my sweet guardian! Hark, a word with you.

128

V,2,3063

Remember! yes.

129

V,2,3068

Sweet honey Greek, tempt me no more to folly.

130

V,2,3071

I'll tell you what,—

131

V,2,3073

In faith, I cannot: what would you have me do?

132

V,2,3076

I prithee, do not hold me to mine oath;
Bid me do any thing but that, sweet Greek.

133

V,2,3081

Diomed,—

134

V,2,3084

Hark, one word in your ear.

135

V,2,3098

Nay, but you part in anger.

136

V,2,3104

Guardian!—why, Greek!

137

V,2,3106

In faith, I do not: come hither once again.

138

V,2,3117

In faith, I will, la; never trust me else.

139

V,2,3119

I'll fetch you one.

140

V,2,3127

Here, Diomed, keep this sleeve.

141

V,2,3131

You look upon that sleeve; behold it well.
He loved me—O false wench!—Give't me again.

142

V,2,3134

It is no matter, now I have't again.
I will not meet with you to-morrow night:...

143

V,2,3139

What, this?

144

V,2,3141

O, all you gods! O pretty, pretty pledge!
Thy master now lies thinking in his bed...

145

V,2,3149

You shall not have it, Diomed; faith, you shall not;
I'll give you something else.

146

V,2,3152

It is no matter.

147

V,2,3154

'Twas one's that loved me better than you will.
But, now you have it, take it.

148

V,2,3157

By all Diana's waiting-women yond,
And by herself, I will not tell you whose.

149

V,2,3163

Well, well, 'tis done, 'tis past: and yet it is not;
I will not keep my word.

150

V,2,3167

You shall not go: one cannot speak a word,
But it straight starts you.

151

V,2,3172

Ay, come:—O Jove!—do come:—I shall be plagued.

152

V,2,3174

Good night: I prithee, come.
[Exit DIOMEDES]...

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