Speeches (Lines) for Duke of Buckingham
in "Richard III"

Total: 91

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,478

Good time of day unto your royal grace!

2

I,3,494

Madam, good hope; his grace speaks cheerfully.

3

I,3,496

Madam, we did: he desires to make atonement
Betwixt the Duke of Gloucester and your brothers,...

4

I,3,651

Northumberland, then present, wept to see it.

5

I,3,740

Have done! for shame, if not for charity.

6

I,3,746

Have done, have done.

7

I,3,752

Nor no one here; for curses never pass
The lips of those that breathe them in the air.

8

I,3,763

Nothing that I respect, my gracious lord.

9

II,1,1153

Whenever Buckingham doth turn his hate
On you or yours,...

10

II,1,1168

And, in good time, here comes the noble duke.

11

II,1,1208

Look I so pale, Lord Dorset, as the rest?

12

II,1,1268

We wait upon your grace.

13

II,2,1385

You cloudy princes and heart-sorrowing peers,
That bear this mutual heavy load of moan,...

14

II,2,1397

Marry, my lord, lest, by a multitude,
The new-heal'd wound of malice should break out,...

15

II,2,1420

My lord, whoever journeys to the Prince,
For God's sake, let not us two be behind;...

16

III,1,1567

Welcome, sweet prince, to London, to your chamber.

17

III,1,1592

And, in good time, here comes the sweating lord.

18

III,1,1599

Fie, what an indirect and peevish course
Is this of hers! Lord cardinal, will your grace...

19

III,1,1612

You are too senseless—obstinate, my lord,
Too ceremonious and traditional...

20

III,1,1639

He did, my gracious lord, begin that place;
Which, since, succeeding ages have re-edified.

21

III,1,1643

Upon record, my gracious lord.

22

III,1,1661

What, my gracious lord?

23

III,1,1667

Now, in good time, here comes the Duke of York.

24

III,1,1705

With what a sharp-provided wit he reasons!
To mitigate the scorn he gives his uncle,...

25

III,1,1726

Think you, my lord, this little prating York
Was not incensed by his subtle mother...

26

III,1,1732

Well, let them rest. Come hither, Catesby.
Thou art sworn as deeply to effect what we intend...

27

III,1,1742

What think'st thou, then, of Stanley? what will he?

28

III,1,1744

Well, then, no more but this: go, gentle Catesby,
And, as it were far off sound thou Lord Hastings,...

29

III,1,1761

Good Catesby, go, effect this business soundly.

30

III,1,1767

Now, my lord, what shall we do, if we perceive
Lord Hastings will not yield to our complots?

31

III,1,1773

I'll claim that promise at your grace's hands.

32

III,2,1904

What, talking with a priest, lord chamberlain?
Your friends at Pomfret, they do need the priest;...

33

III,2,1910

I do, my lord; but long I shall not stay
I shall return before your lordship thence.

34

III,2,1913

[Aside] And supper too, although thou know'st it not.
Come, will you go?

35

III,4,1951

Are all things fitting for that royal time?

36

III,4,1954

Who knows the lord protector's mind herein?
Who is most inward with the royal duke?

37

III,4,1957

Who, I, my lord I we know each other's faces,
But for our hearts, he knows no more of mine,...

38

III,4,1975

Had not you come upon your cue, my lord
William Lord Hastings had pronounced your part,—...

39

III,4,1995

Withdraw you hence, my lord, I'll follow you.

40

III,5,2073

Tut, I can counterfeit the deep tragedian;
Speak and look back, and pry on every side,...

41

III,5,2083

Lord mayor,—

42

III,5,2085

Hark! a drum.

43

III,5,2087

Lord mayor, the reason we have sent—

44

III,5,2089

God and our innocency defend and guard us!

45

III,5,2103

Well, well, he was the covert'st shelter'd traitor
That ever lived....

46

III,5,2139

But since you come too late of our intents,
Yet witness what you hear we did intend:...

47

III,5,2166

Fear not, my lord, I'll play the orator
As if the golden fee for which I plead...

48

III,5,2172

I go: and towards three or four o'clock
Look for the news that the Guildhall affords.

49

III,7,2203

Now, by the holy mother of our Lord,
The citizens are mum and speak not a word.

50

III,7,2206

I did; with his contract with Lady Lucy,
And his contract by deputy in France;...

51

III,7,2225

No, so God help me, they spake not a word;
But, like dumb statues or breathing stones,...

52

III,7,2244

No, by my troth, my lord.

53

III,7,2246

The mayor is here at hand: intend some fear;
Be not you spoke with, but by mighty suit:...

54

III,7,2256

Go, go, up to the leads; the lord mayor knocks.
[Exit GLOUCESTER]...

55

III,7,2270

Return, good Catesby, to thy lord again;
Tell him, myself, the mayor and citizens,...

56

III,7,2277

Ah, ha, my lord, this prince is not an Edward!
He is not lolling on a lewd day-bed,...

57

III,7,2288

I fear he will.
[Re-enter CATESBY]...

58

III,7,2296

Sorry I am my noble cousin should
Suspect me, that I mean no good to him:...

59

III,7,2307

Two props of virtue for a Christian prince,
To stay him from the fall of vanity:...

60

III,7,2320

Even that, I hope, which pleaseth God above,
And all good men of this ungovern'd isle.

61

III,7,2325

You have, my lord: would it might please your grace,
At our entreaties, to amend that fault!

62

III,7,2328

Then know, it is your fault that you resign
The supreme seat, the throne majestical,...

63

III,7,2385

My lord, this argues conscience in your grace;
But the respects thereof are nice and trivial,...

64

III,7,2413

Refuse not, mighty lord, this proffer'd love.

65

III,7,2419

If you refuse it,—as, in love and zeal,
Loath to depose the child, Your brother's son;...

66

III,7,2452

Then I salute you with this kingly title:
Long live Richard, England's royal king!

67

III,7,2455

To-morrow will it please you to be crown'd?

68

III,7,2457

To-morrow, then, we will attend your grace:
And so most joyfully we take our leave.

69

IV,2,2582

My gracious sovereign?

70

IV,2,2589

Still live they and for ever may they last!

71

IV,2,2593

Say on, my loving lord.

72

IV,2,2595

Why, so you are, my thrice renowned liege.

73

IV,2,2597

True, noble prince.

74

IV,2,2604

Your grace may do your pleasure.

75

IV,2,2607

Give me some breath, some little pause, my lord
Before I positively herein:...

76

IV,2,2682

My Lord, I have consider'd in my mind. The late demand that you did sound me in.

77

IV,2,2684

I hear that news, my lord.

78

IV,2,2686

My lord, I claim your gift, my due by promise,
For which your honour and your faith is pawn'd;...

79

IV,2,2692

What says your highness to my just demand?

80

IV,2,2697

My lord!

81

IV,2,2700

My lord, your promise for the earldom,—

82

IV,2,2706

My Lord!

83

IV,2,2708

I am thus bold to put your grace in mind
Of what you promised me.

84

IV,2,2711

Upon the stroke of ten.

85

IV,2,2713

Why let it strike?

86

IV,2,2717

Why, then resolve me whether you will or no.

87

IV,2,2721

Is it even so? rewards he my true service
With such deep contempt made I him king for this?...

88

V,1,3397

Will not King Richard let me speak with him?

89

V,1,3399

Hastings, and Edward's children, Rivers, Grey,
Holy King Henry, and thy fair son Edward,...

90

V,1,3408

Why, then All-Souls' day is my body's doomsday.
This is the day that, in King Edward's time,...

91

V,3,3665

[To KING RICHARD III]
The last was I that helped thee to the crown;...

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