Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Suffolk
in "Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 41

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,4,922

Within the Temple-hall we were too loud;
The garden here is more convenient.

2

II,4,927

Faith, I have been a truant in the law,
And never yet could frame my will to it;...

3

II,4,959

I pluck this red rose with young Somerset
And say withal I think he held the right.

4

II,4,1007

Turn not thy scorns this way, Plantagenet.

5

II,4,1010

I'll turn my part thereof into thy throat.

6

II,4,1046

Go forward and be choked with thy ambition!
And so farewell until I meet thee next.

7

V,3,2503

Be what thou wilt, thou art my prisoner.
[Gazes on her]...

8

V,3,2512

An earl I am, and Suffolk am I call'd.
Be not offended, nature's miracle,...

9

V,3,2535

How canst thou tell she will deny thy suit,
Before thou make a trial of her love?

10

V,3,2538

She's beautiful, and therefore to be woo'd;
She is a woman, therefore to be won.

11

V,3,2541

Fond man, remember that thou hast a wife;
Then how can Margaret be thy paramour?

12

V,3,2544

There all is marr'd; there lies a cooling card.

13

V,3,2546

And yet a dispensation may be had.

14

V,3,2548

I'll win this Lady Margaret. For whom?
Why, for my king: tush, that's a wooden thing!

15

V,3,2551

Yet so my fancy may be satisfied,
And peace established between these realms...

16

V,3,2558

It shall be so, disdain they ne'er so much.
Henry is youthful and will quickly yield....

17

V,3,2563

Lady, vouchsafe to listen what I say.

18

V,3,2566

Sweet madam, give me a hearing in a cause—

19

V,3,2568

Lady, wherefore talk you so?

20

V,3,2570

Say, gentle princess, would you not suppose
Your bondage happy, to be made a queen?

21

V,3,2575

And so shall you,
If happy England's royal king be free.

22

V,3,2578

I'll undertake to make thee Henry's queen,
To put a golden sceptre in thy hand...

23

V,3,2583

His love.

24

V,3,2585

No, gentle madam; I unworthy am
To woo so fair a dame to be his wife,...

25

V,3,2590

Then call our captains and our colours forth.
And, madam, at your father's castle walls...

26

V,3,2596

To me.

27

V,3,2600

Yes, there is remedy enough, my lord:
Consent, and for thy honour give consent,...

28

V,3,2607

Fair Margaret knows
That Suffolk doth not flatter, face, or feign.

29

V,3,2612

And here I will expect thy coming.

30

V,3,2616

Thanks, Reignier, happy for so sweet a child,
Fit to be made companion with a king:...

31

V,3,2625

That is her ransom; I deliver her;
And those two counties I will undertake...

32

V,3,2631

Reignier of France, I give thee kingly thanks,
Because this is in traffic of a king....

33

V,3,2645

Farewell, sweet madam: but hark you, Margaret;
No princely commendations to my king?

34

V,3,2649

Words sweetly placed and modestly directed.
But madam, I must trouble you again;...

35

V,3,2654

And this withal.

36

V,3,2659

O, wert thou for myself! But, Suffolk, stay;
Thou mayst not wander in that labyrinth;...

37

V,5,2863

Tush, my good lord, this superficial tale
Is but a preface of her worthy praise;...

38

V,5,2883

As doth a ruler with unlawful oaths;
Or one that, at a triumph having vow'd...

39

V,5,2892

Yes, lord, her father is a king,
The King of Naples and Jerusalem;...

40

V,5,2901

A dower, my lords! disgrace not so your king,
That he should be so abject, base and poor,...

41

V,5,2958

Thus Suffolk hath prevail'd; and thus he goes,
As did the youthful Paris once to Greece,...

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