Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Suffolk
in "Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 67

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,5

As by your high imperial majesty
I had in charge at my depart for France,...

2

I,1,45

My lord protector, so it please your grace,
Here are the articles of contracted peace...

3

I,3,398

How now, fellow! would'st anything with me?

4

I,3,407

Thy wife, too! that's some wrong, indeed. What's
yours? What's here!...

5

I,3,420

Who is there?
[Enter Servant]...

6

I,3,456

Madam, be patient: as I was cause
Your highness came to England, so will I...

7

I,3,463

And he of these that can do most of all
Cannot do more in England than the Nevils:...

8

I,3,479

Madam, myself have limed a bush for her,
And placed a quire of such enticing birds,...

9

I,3,516

Resign it then and leave thine insolence.
Since thou wert king—as who is king but thou?—...

10

I,3,561

Before we make election, give me leave
To show some reason, of no little force,...

11

I,3,574

Peace, headstrong Warwick!

12

I,3,578

Because here is a man accused of treason:
Pray God the Duke of York excuse himself!

13

I,3,582

Please it your majesty, this is the man
That doth accuse his master of high treason:...

14

II,1,735

No marvel, an it like your majesty,
My lord protector's hawks do tower so well;...

15

II,1,753

No malice, sir; no more than well becomes
So good a quarrel and so bad a peer.

16

II,1,756

Why, as you, my lord,
An't like your lordly lord-protectorship.

17

II,1,799

Come to the king and tell him what miracle.

18

II,1,819

What woman is this?

19

II,1,838

How camest thou so?

20

II,1,860

And yet, I think, jet did he never see.

21

II,1,908

True; made the lame to leap and fly away.

22

II,3,1090

Thus droops this lofty pine and hangs his sprays;
Thus Eleanor's pride dies in her youngest days.

23

III,1,1319

Well hath your highness seen into this duke;
And, had I first been put to speak my mind,...

24

III,1,1375

Nay, Gloucester, know that thou art come too soon,
Unless thou wert more loyal than thou art:...

25

III,1,1414

My lord, these faults are easy, quickly answered:
But mightier crimes are laid unto your charge,...

26

III,1,1459

Hath he not twit our sovereign lady here
With ignominious words, though clerkly couch'd,...

27

III,1,1522

But, in my mind, that were no policy:
The king will labour still to save his life,...

28

III,1,1528

Ah, York, no man alive so fain as I!

29

III,1,1536

Madam, 'tis true; and were't not madness, then,
To make the fox surveyor of the fold?...

30

III,1,1551

Not resolute, except so much were done;
For things are often spoke and seldom meant:...

31

III,1,1562

Here is my hand, the deed is worthy doing.

32

III,1,1601

Why, our authority is his consent,
And what we do establish he confirms:...

33

III,1,1606

A charge, Lord York, that I will see perform'd.
But now return we to the false Duke Humphrey.

34

III,1,1615

I'll see it truly done, my Lord of York.

35

III,2,1680

Now, sirs, have you dispatch'd this thing?

36

III,2,1682

Why, that's well said. Go, get you to my house;
I will reward you for this venturous deed....

37

III,2,1688

Away! be gone.
[Exeunt Murderers]...

38

III,2,1695

I'll call him presently, my noble lord.

39

III,2,1708

Dead in his bed, my lord; Gloucester is dead.

40

III,2,1716

He doth revive again: madam, be patient.

41

III,2,1719

Comfort, my sovereign! gracious Henry, comfort!

42

III,2,1843

A dreadful oath, sworn with a solemn tongue!
What instance gives Lord Warwick for his vow?

43

III,2,1864

Why, Warwick, who should do the duke to death?
Myself and Beaufort had him in protection;...

44

III,2,1882

I wear no knife to slaughter sleeping men;
But here's a vengeful sword, rusted with ease,...

45

III,2,1896

Blunt-witted lord, ignoble in demeanor!
If ever lady wrong'd her lord so much,...

46

III,2,1913

Thou shall be waking well I shed thy blood,
If from this presence thou darest go with me.

47

III,2,1930

The traitorous Warwick with the men of Bury
Set all upon me, mighty sovereign.

48

III,2,1963

'Tis like the commons, rude unpolish'd hinds,
Could send such message to their sovereign:...

49

III,2,1999

Cease, gentle queen, these execrations,
And let thy Suffolk take his heavy leave.

50

III,2,2003

A plague upon them! wherefore should I curse them?
Would curses kill, as doth the mandrake's groan,...

51

III,2,2027

You bade me ban, and will you bid me leave?
Now, by the ground that I am banish'd from,...

52

III,2,2051

Thus is poor Suffolk ten times banished;
Once by the king, and three times thrice by thee....

53

III,2,2084

If I depart from thee, I cannot live;
And in thy sight to die, what were it else...

54

III,2,2104

I go.

55

III,2,2106

A jewel, lock'd into the wofull'st cask
That ever did contain a thing of worth....

56

IV,1,2181

Look on my George; I am a gentleman:
Rate me at what thou wilt, thou shalt be paid.

57

IV,1,2186

Thy name affrights me, in whose sound is death.
A cunning man did calculate my birth...

58

IV,1,2197

Stay, Whitmore; for thy prisoner is a prince,
The Duke of Suffolk, William de la Pole.

59

IV,1,2200

Ay, but these rags are no part of the duke:
Jove sometimes went disguised, and why not I?

60

IV,1,2203

Obscure and lowly swain, King Henry's blood,
The honourable blood of Lancaster,...

61

IV,1,2220

Base slave, thy words are blunt and so art thou.

62

IV,1,2223

Thou darest not, for thy own.

63

IV,1,2225

Pole!

64

IV,1,2260

O that I were a god, to shoot forth thunder
Upon these paltry, servile, abject drudges!...

65

IV,1,2273

Gelidus timor occupat artus it is thee I fear.

66

IV,1,2277

Suffolk's imperial tongue is stern and rough,
Used to command, untaught to plead for favour....

67

IV,1,2288

Come, soldiers, show what cruelty ye can,
That this my death may never be forgot!...

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