Speeches (Lines) for Edmund of Langley
in "Richard II"

Total: 54

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,685

Vex not yourself, nor strive not with your breath;
For all in vain comes counsel to his ear.

2

II,1,699

No; it is stopp'd with other flattering sounds,
As praises, of whose taste the wise are fond,...

3

II,1,753

The king is come: deal mildly with his youth;
For young hot colts being raged do rage the more.

4

II,1,826

I do beseech your majesty, impute his words
To wayward sickliness and age in him:...

5

II,1,838

Be York the next that must be bankrupt so!
Though death be poor, it ends a mortal woe.

6

II,1,850

How long shall I be patient? ah, how long
Shall tender duty make me suffer wrong?...

7

II,1,874

O my liege,
Pardon me, if you please; if not, I, pleased...

8

II,1,899

I'll not be by the while: my liege, farewell:
What will ensue hereof, there's none can tell;...

9

II,2,1074

Should I do so, I should belie my thoughts:
Comfort's in heaven; and we are on the earth,...

10

II,2,1085

He was? Why, so! go all which way it will!
The nobles they are fled, the commons they are cold,...

11

II,2,1094

What is't, knave?

12

II,2,1096

God for his mercy! what a tide of woes
Comes rushing on this woeful land at once!...

13

II,3,1241

Show me thy humble heart, and not thy knee,
Whose duty is deceiveable and false.

14

II,3,1244

Tut, tut!
Grace me no grace, nor uncle me no uncle:...

15

II,3,1266

Even in condition of the worst degree,
In gross rebellion and detested treason:...

16

II,3,1298

My lords of England, let me tell you this:
I have had feeling of my cousin's wrongs...

17

II,3,1310

Well, well, I see the issue of these arms:
I cannot mend it, I must needs confess,...

18

II,3,1325

It may be I will go with you: but yet I'll pause;
For I am loath to break our country's laws....

19

III,1,1401

A gentleman of mine I have dispatch'd
With letters of your love to her at large.

20

III,3,1641

It would beseem the Lord Northumberland
To say 'King Richard:' alack the heavy day...

21

III,3,1646

The time hath been,
Would you have been so brief with him, he would...

22

III,3,1651

Take not, good cousin, further than you should.
Lest you mistake the heavens are o'er our heads.

23

III,3,1708

Yet looks he like a king: behold, his eye,
As bright as is the eagle's, lightens forth...

24

IV,1,2091

Great Duke of Lancaster, I come to thee
From plume-pluck'd Richard; who with willing soul...

25

IV,1,2142

I will be his conduct.

26

IV,1,2165

To do that office of thine own good will
Which tired majesty did make thee offer,...

27

V,2,2443

Where did I leave?

28

V,2,2447

Then, as I said, the duke, great Bolingbroke,
Mounted upon a hot and fiery steed...

29

V,2,2464

As in a theatre, the eyes of men,
After a well-graced actor leaves the stage,...

30

V,2,2483

Aumerle that was;
But that is lost for being Richard's friend,...

31

V,2,2493

Well, bear you well in this new spring of time,
Lest you be cropp'd before you come to prime....

32

V,2,2497

You will be there, I know.

33

V,2,2499

What seal is that, that hangs without thy bosom?
Yea, look'st thou pale? let me see the writing.

34

V,2,2502

No matter, then, who see it;
I will be satisfied; let me see the writing.

35

V,2,2507

Which for some reasons, sir, I mean to see.
I fear, I fear,—

36

V,2,2512

Bound to himself! what doth he with a bond
That he is bound to? Wife, thou art a fool....

37

V,2,2516

I will be satisfied; let me see it, I say.
[He plucks it out of his bosom and reads it]...

38

V,2,2520

Ho! who is within there?
[Enter a Servant]...

39

V,2,2525

Give me my boots, I say; saddle my horse.
Now, by mine honour, by my life, by my troth,...

40

V,2,2529

Peace, foolish woman.

41

V,2,2534

Bring me my boots: I will unto the king.

42

V,2,2538

Give me my boots, I say.

43

V,2,2546

Thou fond mad woman,
Wilt thou conceal this dark conspiracy?...

44

V,2,2553

Away, fond woman! were he twenty times my son,
I would appeach him.

45

V,2,2564

Make way, unruly woman!

46

V,3,2615

[Within] My liege, beware; look to thyself;
Thou hast a traitor in thy presence there.

47

V,3,2620

[Within] Open the door, secure, foolhardy king:
Shall I for love speak treason to thy face?...

48

V,3,2627

Peruse this writing here, and thou shalt know
The treason that my haste forbids me show.

49

V,3,2632

It was, villain, ere thy hand did set it down.
I tore it from the traitor's bosom, king;...

50

V,3,2645

So shall my virtue be his vice's bawd;
And he shall spend mine honour with his shame,...

51

V,3,2662

If thou do pardon, whosoever pray,
More sins for this forgiveness prosper may....

52

V,3,2669

Thou frantic woman, what dost thou make here?
Shall thy old dugs once more a traitor rear?

53

V,3,2680

Against them both my true joints bended be.
Ill mayst thou thrive, if thou grant any grace!

54

V,3,2702

Speak it in French, king; say, 'pardonne moi.'

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