Speeches (Lines) for Ferdinand
in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 117

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,3

Let fame, that all hunt after in their lives,
Live register'd upon our brazen tombs...

2

I,1,51

Your oath is pass'd to pass away from these.

3

I,1,58

Why, that to know, which else we should not know.

4

I,1,60

Ay, that is study's godlike recompense.

5

I,1,72

These be the stops that hinder study quite
And train our intellects to vain delight.

6

I,1,96

How well he's read, to reason against reading!

7

I,1,104

Biron is like an envious sneaping frost,
That bites the first-born infants of the spring.

8

I,1,114

Well, sit you out: go home, Biron: adieu.

9

I,1,122

How well this yielding rescues thee from shame!

10

I,1,145

What say you, lords? Why, this was quite forgot.

11

I,1,151

We must of force dispense with this decree;
She must lie here on mere necessity.

12

I,1,167

Ay, that there is. Our court, you know, is haunted
With a refined traveller of Spain;...

13

I,1,196

A letter from the magnificent Armado.

14

I,1,217

Will you hear this letter with attention?

15

I,1,220

[Reads] 'Great deputy, the welkin's vicegerent and
sole dominator of Navarre, my soul's earth's god,...

16

I,1,224

[Reads] 'So it is,'—

17

I,1,227

Peace!

18

I,1,229

No words!

19

I,1,231

[Reads] 'So it is, besieged with sable-coloured
melancholy, I did commend the black-oppressing humour...

20

I,1,249

[Reads] 'that unlettered small-knowing soul,'—

21

I,1,251

[Reads] 'that shallow vassal,'—

22

I,1,253

[Reads] 'which, as I remember, hight Costard,'—

23

I,1,255

[Reads] 'sorted and consorted, contrary to thy
established proclaimed edict and continent canon,...

24

I,1,260

[Reads] 'with a child of our grandmother Eve, a
female; or, for thy more sweet understanding, a...

25

I,1,268

[Reads] 'For Jaquenetta,—so is the weaker vessel
called which I apprehended with the aforesaid...

26

I,1,277

Ay, the best for the worst. But, sirrah, what say
you to this?

27

I,1,280

Did you hear the proclamation?

28

I,1,283

It was proclaimed a year's imprisonment, to be taken
with a wench.

29

I,1,286

Well, it was proclaimed 'damsel.'

30

I,1,288

It is so varied, too; for it was proclaimed 'virgin.'

31

I,1,290

This maid will not serve your turn, sir.

32

I,1,292

Sir, I will pronounce your sentence: you shall fast
a week with bran and water.

33

I,1,295

And Don Armado shall be your keeper.
My Lord Biron, see him deliver'd o'er:...

34

II,1,580

Fair princess, welcome to the court of Navarre.

35

II,1,584

You shall be welcome, madam, to my court.

36

II,1,586

Hear me, dear lady; I have sworn an oath.

37

II,1,588

Not for the world, fair madam, by my will.

38

II,1,590

Your ladyship is ignorant what it is.

39

II,1,600

Madam, I will, if suddenly I may.

40

II,1,618

Madam, your father here doth intimate
The payment of a hundred thousand crowns;...

41

II,1,647

I do protest I never heard of it;
And if you prove it, I'll repay it back...

42

II,1,654

Satisfy me so.

43

II,1,658

It shall suffice me: at which interview
All liberal reason I will yield unto....

44

II,1,670

Thy own wish wish I thee in every place!

45

IV,3,1341

Ay me!

46

IV,3,1345

[Reads]
So sweet a kiss the golden sun gives not...

47

IV,3,1370

In love, I hope: sweet fellowship in shame!

48

IV,3,1421

And I mine too, good Lord!

49

IV,3,1459

[Advancing] Come, sir, you blush; as his your case is such;
You chide at him, offending twice as much;...

50

IV,3,1506

Too bitter is thy jest.
Are we betray'd thus to thy over-view?

51

IV,3,1519

Soft! whither away so fast?
A true man or a thief that gallops so?

52

IV,3,1524

What present hast thou there?

53

IV,3,1526

What makes treason here?

54

IV,3,1528

If it mar nothing neither,
The treason and you go in peace away together.

55

IV,3,1532

Biron, read it over.
[Giving him the paper]...

56

IV,3,1536

Where hadst thou it?

57

IV,3,1539

How now! what is in you? why dost thou tear it?

58

IV,3,1547

What?

59

IV,3,1555

Hence, sirs; away!

60

IV,3,1564

What, did these rent lines show some love of thine?

61

IV,3,1573

What zeal, what fury hath inspired thee now?
My love, her mistress, is a gracious moon;...

62

IV,3,1591

By heaven, thy love is black as ebony.

63

IV,3,1598

O paradox! Black is the badge of hell,
The hue of dungeons and the suit of night;...

64

IV,3,1612

And Ethiopes of their sweet complexion crack.

65

IV,3,1616

'Twere good, yours did; for, sir, to tell you plain,
I'll find a fairer face not wash'd to-day.

66

IV,3,1619

No devil will fright thee then so much as she.

67

IV,3,1626

But what of this? are we not all in love?

68

IV,3,1628

Then leave this chat; and, good Biron, now prove
Our loving lawful, and our faith not torn.

69

IV,3,1711

Saint Cupid, then! and, soldiers, to the field!

70

IV,3,1717

And win them too: therefore let us devise
Some entertainment for them in their tents.

71

IV,3,1726

Away, away! no time shall be omitted
That will betime, and may by us be fitted.

72

V,2,2075

Say to her, we have measured many miles
To tread a measure with her on this grass.

73

V,2,2096

Blessed are clouds, to do as such clouds do!
Vouchsafe, bright moon, and these thy stars, to shine,...

74

V,2,2101

Then, in our measure do but vouchsafe one change.
Thou bid'st me beg: this begging is not strange.

75

V,2,2106

Will you not dance? How come you thus estranged?

76

V,2,2108

Yet still she is the moon, and I the man.
The music plays; vouchsafe some motion to it.

77

V,2,2111

But your legs should do it.

78

V,2,2114

Why take we hands, then?

79

V,2,2117

More measure of this measure; be not nice.

80

V,2,2119

Prize you yourselves: what buys your company?

81

V,2,2121

That can never be.

82

V,2,2124

If you deny to dance, let's hold more chat.

83

V,2,2126

I am best pleased with that.

84

V,2,2174

Farewell, mad wenches; you have simple wits.

85

V,2,2227

Fair sir, God save you! Where's the princess?

86

V,2,2230

That she vouchsafe me audience for one word.

87

V,2,2253

A blister on his sweet tongue, with my heart,
That put Armado's page out of his part!

88

V,2,2259

All hail, sweet madam, and fair time of day!

89

V,2,2261

Construe my speeches better, if you may.

90

V,2,2263

We came to visit you, and purpose now
To lead you to our court; vouchsafe it then.

91

V,2,2267

Rebuke me not for that which you provoke:
The virtue of your eye must break my oath.

92

V,2,2277

O, you have lived in desolation here,
Unseen, unvisited, much to our shame.

93

V,2,2282

How, madam! Russians!

94

V,2,2311

We are descried; they'll mock us now downright.

95

V,2,2354

Teach us, sweet madam, for our rude transgression
Some fair excuse.

96

V,2,2358

Madam, I was.

97

V,2,2360

I was, fair madam.

98

V,2,2363

That more than all the world I did respect her.

99

V,2,2365

Upon mine honour, no.

100

V,2,2368

Despise me, when I break this oath of mine.

101

V,2,2377

What mean you, madam? by my life, my troth,
I never swore this lady such an oath.

102

V,2,2381

My faith and this the princess I did give:
I knew her by this jewel on her sleeve.

103

V,2,2443

Biron, they will shame us: let them not approach.

104

V,2,2446

I say they shall not come.

105

V,2,2467

Here is like to be a good presence of Worthies. He
presents Hector of Troy; the swain, Pompey the...

106

V,2,2474

You are deceived; 'tis not so.

107

V,2,2479

The ship is under sail, and here she comes amain.

108

V,2,2577

Hector was but a Troyan in respect of this.

109

V,2,2579

I think Hector was not so clean-timbered.

110

V,2,2667

How fares your majesty?

111

V,2,2669

Madam, not so; I do beseech you, stay.

112

V,2,2681

The extreme parts of time extremely forms
All causes to the purpose of his speed,...

113

V,2,2728

Now, at the latest minute of the hour,
Grant us your loves.

114

V,2,2755

If this, or more than this, I would deny,
To flatter up these powers of mine with rest,...

115

V,2,2816

No, madam; we will bring you on your way.

116

V,2,2820

Come, sir, it wants a twelvemonth and a day,
And then 'twill end.

117

V,2,2834

Call them forth quickly; we will do so.

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