Speeches (Lines) for Isabella
in "Measure for Measure"

Total: 129

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,4,349

And have you nuns no farther privileges?

2

I,4,351

Yes, truly; I speak not as desiring more;
But rather wishing a more strict restraint...

3

I,4,355

Who's that which calls?

4

I,4,365

Peace and prosperity! Who is't that calls

5

I,4,372

Why 'her unhappy brother'? let me ask,
The rather for I now must make you know...

6

I,4,377

Woe me! for what?

7

I,4,381

Sir, make me not your story.

8

I,4,390

You do blaspheme the good in mocking me.

9

I,4,397

Some one with child by him? My cousin Juliet?

10

I,4,399

Adoptedly; as school-maids change their names
By vain though apt affection.

11

I,4,402

O, let him marry her.

12

I,4,426

Doth he so seek his life?

13

I,4,430

Alas! what poor ability's in me
To do him good?

14

I,4,433

My power? Alas, I doubt—

15

I,4,441

I'll see what I can do.

16

I,4,443

I will about it straight;
No longer staying but to give the mother...

17

I,4,449

Good sir, adieu.

18

II,2,776

I am a woeful suitor to your honour,
Please but your honour hear me.

19

II,2,779

There is a vice that most I do abhor,
And most desire should meet the blow of justice;...

20

II,2,785

I have a brother is condemn'd to die:
I do beseech you, let it be his fault,...

21

II,2,794

O just but severe law!
I had a brother, then. Heaven keep your honour!

22

II,2,802

Must he needs die?

23

II,2,804

Yes; I do think that you might pardon him,
And neither heaven nor man grieve at the mercy.

24

II,2,807

But can you, if you would?

25

II,2,809

But might you do't, and do the world no wrong,
If so your heart were touch'd with that remorse...

26

II,2,814

Too late? why, no; I, that do speak a word.
May call it back again. Well, believe this,...

27

II,2,825

I would to heaven I had your potency,
And you were Isabel! should it then be thus?...

28

II,2,833

Alas, alas!
Why, all the souls that were were forfeit once;...

29

II,2,845

To-morrow! O, that's sudden! Spare him, spare him!
He's not prepared for death. Even for our kitchens...

30

II,2,863

Yet show some pity.

31

II,2,870

So you must be the first that gives this sentence,
And he, that suffer's. O, it is excellent...

32

II,2,875

Could great men thunder
As Jove himself does, Jove would ne'er be quiet,...

33

II,2,893

We cannot weigh our brother with ourself:
Great men may jest with saints; 'tis wit in them,...

34

II,2,897

That in the captain's but a choleric word,
Which in the soldier is flat blasphemy.

35

II,2,901

Because authority, though it err like others,
Hath yet a kind of medicine in itself,...

36

II,2,911

Gentle my lord, turn back.

37

II,2,913

Hark how I'll bribe you: good my lord, turn back.

38

II,2,915

Ay, with such gifts that heaven shall share with you.

39

II,2,917

Not with fond shekels of the tested gold,
Or stones whose rates are either rich or poor...

40

II,2,926

Heaven keep your honour safe!

41

II,2,930

At what hour to-morrow
Shall I attend your lordship?

42

II,2,933

'Save your honour!

43

II,4,1053

I am come to know your pleasure.

44

II,4,1056

Even so. Heaven keep your honour!

45

II,4,1059

Under your sentence?

46

II,4,1061

When, I beseech you? that in his reprieve,
Longer or shorter, he may be so fitted...

47

II,4,1072

'Tis set down so in heaven, but not in earth.

48

II,4,1078

Sir, believe this,
I had rather give my body than my soul.

49

II,4,1082

How say you?

50

II,4,1089

Please you to do't,
I'll take it as a peril to my soul,...

51

II,4,1094

That I do beg his life, if it be sin,
Heaven let me bear it! you granting of my suit,...

52

II,4,1102

Let me be ignorant, and in nothing good,
But graciously to know I am no better.

53

II,4,1110

So.

54

II,4,1113

True.

55

II,4,1125

As much for my poor brother as myself:
That is, were I under the terms of death,...

56

II,4,1132

And 'twere the cheaper way:
Better it were a brother died at once,...

57

II,4,1138

Ignomy in ransom and free pardon
Are of two houses: lawful mercy...

58

II,4,1144

O, pardon me, my lord; it oft falls out,
To have what we would have, we speak not what we mean:...

59

II,4,1149

Else let my brother die,
If not a feodary, but only he...

60

II,4,1153

Ay, as the glasses where they view themselves;
Which are as easy broke as they make forms....

61

II,4,1168

I have no tongue but one: gentle my lord,
Let me entreat you speak the former language.

62

II,4,1171

My brother did love Juliet,
And you tell me that he shall die for it.

63

II,4,1174

I know your virtue hath a licence in't,
Which seems a little fouler than it is,...

64

II,4,1179

Ha! little honour to be much believed,
And most pernicious purpose! Seeming, seeming!...

65

II,4,1203

To whom should I complain? Did I tell this,
Who would believe me? O perilous mouths,...

66

III,1,1267

[Within] What, ho! Peace here; grace and good company!

67

III,1,1272

My business is a word or two with Claudio.

68

III,1,1279

Why,
As all comforts are; most good, most good indeed....

69

III,1,1287

None, but such remedy as, to save a head,
To cleave a heart in twain.

70

III,1,1290

Yes, brother, you may live:
There is a devilish mercy in the judge,...

71

III,1,1295

Ay, just; perpetual durance, a restraint,
Though all the world's vastidity you had,...

72

III,1,1299

In such a one as, you consenting to't,
Would bark your honour from that trunk you bear,...

73

III,1,1303

O, I do fear thee, Claudio; and I quake,
Lest thou a feverous life shouldst entertain,...

74

III,1,1316

There spake my brother; there my father's grave
Did utter forth a voice. Yes, thou must die:...

75

III,1,1326

O, 'tis the cunning livery of hell,
The damned'st body to invest and cover...

76

III,1,1332

Yes, he would give't thee, from this rank offence,
So to offend him still. This night's the time...

77

III,1,1337

O, were it but my life,
I'ld throw it down for your deliverance...

78

III,1,1341

Be ready, Claudio, for your death tomorrow.

79

III,1,1346

Which is the least?

80

III,1,1350

What says my brother?

81

III,1,1352

And shamed life a hateful.

82

III,1,1368

Alas, alas!

83

III,1,1373

O you beast!
O faithless coward! O dishonest wretch!...

84

III,1,1386

O, fie, fie, fie!
Thy sin's not accidental, but a trade....

85

III,1,1393

What is your will?

86

III,1,1397

I have no superfluous leisure; my stay must be
stolen out of other affairs; but I will attend you awhile.

87

III,1,1432

I am now going to resolve him: I had rather my
brother die by the law than my son should be...

88

III,1,1449

Let me hear you speak farther. I have spirit to do
anything that appears not foul in the truth of my spirit.

89

III,1,1454

I have heard of the lady, and good words went with her name.

90

III,1,1466

Can this be so? did Angelo so leave her?

91

III,1,1473

What a merit were it in death to take this poor maid
from the world! What corruption in this life, that...

92

III,1,1479

Show me how, good father.

93

III,1,1501

The image of it gives me content already; and I
trust it will grow to a most prosperous perfection.

94

III,1,1510

I thank you for this comfort. Fare you well, good father.

95

IV,1,1825

He hath a garden circummured with brick,
Whose western side is with a vineyard back'd;...

96

IV,1,1835

I have ta'en a due and wary note upon't:
With whispering and most guilty diligence,...

97

IV,1,1841

No, none, but only a repair i' the dark;
And that I have possess'd him my most stay...

98

IV,1,1853

I do desire the like.

99

IV,1,1870

She'll take the enterprise upon her, father,
If you advise it.

100

IV,1,1874

Little have you to say
When you depart from him, but, soft and low,...

101

IV,3,2230

[Within] Peace, ho, be here!

102

IV,3,2237

Ho, by your leave!

103

IV,3,2239

The better, given me by so holy a man.
Hath yet the deputy sent my brother's pardon?

104

IV,3,2243

Nay, but it is not so.

105

IV,3,2246

O, I will to him and pluck out his eyes!

106

IV,3,2248

Unhappy Claudio! wretched Isabel!
Injurious world! most damned Angelo!

107

IV,3,2264

I am directed by you.

108

IV,6,2364

To speak so indirectly I am loath:
I would say the truth; but to accuse him so,...

109

IV,6,2369

Besides, he tells me that, if peradventure
He speak against me on the adverse side,...

110

IV,6,2374

O, peace! the friar is come.

111

V,1,2408

Justice, O royal duke! Vail your regard
Upon a wrong'd, I would fain have said, a maid!...

112

V,1,2417

O worthy duke,
You bid me seek redemption of the devil:...

113

V,1,2425

By course of justice!

114

V,1,2427

Most strange, but yet most truly, will I speak:
That Angelo's forsworn; is it not strange?...

115

V,1,2434

It is not truer he is Angelo
Than this is all as true as it is strange:...

116

V,1,2440

O prince, I conjure thee, as thou believest
There is another comfort than this world,...

117

V,1,2457

O gracious duke,
Harp not on that, nor do not banish reason...

118

V,1,2464

I am the sister of one Claudio,
Condemn'd upon the act of fornication...

119

V,1,2474

That's he indeed.

120

V,1,2484

This gentleman told somewhat of my tale,—

121

V,1,2488

I went
To this pernicious caitiff deputy,—

122

V,1,2491

Pardon it;
The phrase is to the matter.

123

V,1,2494

In brief, to set the needless process by,
How I persuaded, how I pray'd, and kneel'd,...

124

V,1,2507

O, that it were as like as it is true!

125

V,1,2518

And is this all?
Then, O you blessed ministers above,...

126

V,1,2529

One that I would were here, Friar Lodowick.

127

V,1,2808

O, give me pardon,
That I, your vassal, have employ'd and pain'd...

128

V,1,2824

I do, my lord.

129

V,1,2877

Most bounteous sir,
[Kneeling]...

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