Speeches (Lines) for Jessica
in "Merchant of Venice"

Total: 26

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,3,776

I am sorry thou wilt leave my father so:
Our house is hell, and thou, a merry devil,...

2

II,3,790

Farewell, good Launcelot.
[Exit Launcelot]...

3

II,5,858

Call you? what is your will?

4

II,5,893

His words were 'Farewell mistress;' nothing else.

5

II,5,905

Farewell; and if my fortune be not crost,
I have a father, you a daughter, lost.

6

II,6,937

Who are you? Tell me, for more certainty,
Albeit I'll swear that I do know your tongue.

7

II,6,940

Lorenzo, certain, and my love indeed,
For who love I so much? And now who knows...

8

II,6,944

Here, catch this casket; it is worth the pains.
I am glad 'tis night, you do not look on me,...

9

II,6,952

What, must I hold a candle to my shames?
They in themselves, good-sooth, are too too light....

10

II,6,961

I will make fast the doors, and gild myself
With some more ducats, and be with you straight.

11

III,2,1661

When I was with him I have heard him swear
To Tubal and to Chus, his countrymen,...

12

III,4,1792

I wish your ladyship all heart's content.

13

III,5,1849

And what hope is that, I pray thee?

14

III,5,1852

That were a kind of bastard hope, indeed: so the
sins of my mother should be visited upon me.

15

III,5,1858

I shall be saved by my husband; he hath made me a
Christian.

16

III,5,1866

I'll tell my husband, Launcelot, what you say: here he comes.

17

III,5,1869

Nay, you need not fear us, Lorenzo: Launcelot and I
are out. He tells me flatly, there is no mercy for...

18

III,5,1909

Past all expressing. It is very meet
The Lord Bassanio live an upright life;...

19

III,5,1922

Nay, but ask my opinion too of that.

20

III,5,1924

Nay, let me praise you while I have a stomach.

21

III,5,1928

Well, I'll set you forth.

22

V,1,2450

In such a night
Did Thisbe fearfully o'ertrip the dew...

23

V,1,2458

In such a night
Medea gather'd the enchanted herbs...

24

V,1,2465

In such a night
Did young Lorenzo swear he loved her well,...

25

V,1,2472

I would out-night you, did no body come;
But, hark, I hear the footing of a man.

26

V,1,2525

I am never merry when I hear sweet music.

Return to the "Merchant of Venice" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS