Speeches (Lines) for Lord Clifford
in "Henry VI, Part III"

Total: 35

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,64

The hope thereof makes Clifford mourn in steel.

2

I,1,68

Patience is for poltroons, such as he:
He durst not sit there, had your father lived....

3

I,1,89

Whom should he follow but his natural king?

4

I,1,105

Urge it no more; lest that, instead of words,
I send thee, Warwick, such a messenger...

5

I,1,166

King Henry, be thy title right or wrong,
Lord Clifford vows to fight in thy defence:...

6

I,1,185

What wrong is this unto the prince your son!

7

I,1,188

How hast thou injured both thyself and us!

8

I,1,191

Come, cousin, let us tell the queen these news.

9

I,1,196

In dreadful war mayst thou be overcome,
Or live in peace abandon'd and despised!

10

I,3,379

Chaplain, away! thy priesthood saves thy life.
As for the brat of this accursed duke,...

11

I,3,383

Soldiers, away with him!

12

I,3,387

How now! is he dead already? or is it fear
That makes him close his eyes? I'll open them.

13

I,3,398

In vain thou speak'st, poor boy; my father's blood
Hath stopp'd the passage where thy words should enter.

14

I,3,402

Had thy brethren here, their lives and thine
Were not revenge sufficient for me;...

15

I,3,415

Such pity as my rapier's point affords.

16

I,3,417

Thy father hath.

17

I,3,425

No cause!
Thy father slew my father; therefore, die.

18

I,3,430

Plantagenet! I come, Plantagenet!
And this thy son's blood cleaving to my blade...

19

I,4,469

Ay, to such mercy as his ruthless arm,
With downright payment, show'd unto my father....

20

I,4,478

So cowards fight when they can fly no further;
So doves do peck the falcon's piercing talons;...

21

I,4,487

I will not bandy with thee word for word,
But buckle with thee blows, twice two for one.

22

I,4,500

Ay, ay, so strives the woodcock with the gin.

23

I,4,549

That is my office, for my father's sake.

24

I,4,616

Here's for my oath, here's for my father's death.

25

II,2,851

My gracious liege, this too much lenity
And harmful pity must be laid aside....

26

II,2,908

Why, that is spoken like a toward prince.

27

II,2,916

I would your highness would depart the field:
The queen hath best success when you are absent.

28

II,2,938

And reason too:
Who should succeed the father but the son?

29

II,2,941

Ay, crook-back, here I stand to answer thee,
Or any he the proudest of thy sort.

30

II,2,944

Ay, and old York, and yet not satisfied.

31

II,2,951

You said so much before, and yet you fled.

32

II,2,958

I slew thy father, call'st thou him a child?

33

II,2,966

My liege, the wound that bred this meeting here
Cannot be cured by words; therefore be still.

34

II,4,1091

Now, Richard, I am with thee here alone:
This is the hand that stabb'd thy father York;...

35

II,6,1251

Here burns my candle out; ay, here it dies,
Which, whiles it lasted, gave King Henry light....

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