Speeches (Lines) for Marcus Andronicus
in "Titus Andronicus"

Total: 63

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,23

Princes, that strive by factions and by friends
Ambitiously for rule and empery,...

2

I,1,193

Long live Lord Titus, my beloved brother,
Gracious triumpher in the eyes of Rome!

3

I,1,196

And welcome, nephews, from successful wars,
You that survive, and you that sleep in fame!...

4

I,1,225

Titus, thou shalt obtain and ask the empery.

5

I,1,255

With voices and applause of every sort,
Patricians and plebeians, we create...

6

I,1,309

'Suum cuique' is our Roman justice:
This prince in justice seizeth but his own.

7

I,1,383

O Titus, see, O, see what thou hast done!
In a bad quarrel slain a virtuous son.

8

I,1,397

My lord, this is impiety in you:
My nephew Mutius' deeds do plead for him...

9

I,1,405

No, noble Titus, but entreat of thee
To pardon Mutius and to bury him.

10

I,1,414

Brother, for in that name doth nature plead,—

11

I,1,417

Renowned Titus, more than half my soul,—

12

I,1,419

Suffer thy brother Marcus to inter
His noble nephew here in virtue's nest,...

13

I,1,437

My lord, to step out of these dreary dumps,
How comes it that the subtle Queen of Goths...

14

I,1,528

That, on mine honour, here I do protest.

15

II,2,723

I have dogs, my lord,
Will rouse the proudest panther in the chase,...

16

II,4,1075

Who is this? my niece, that flies away so fast!
Cousin, a word; where is your husband?...

17

III,1,1188

Titus, prepare thy aged eyes to weep;
Or, if not so, thy noble heart to break:...

18

III,1,1192

This was thy daughter.

19

III,1,1212

O, that delightful engine of her thoughts
That blabb'd them with such pleasing eloquence,...

20

III,1,1218

O, thus I found her, straying in the park,
Seeking to hide herself, as doth the deer...

21

III,1,1244

Perchance she weeps because they kill'd her husband;
Perchance because she knows them innocent.

22

III,1,1268

Patience, dear niece. Good Titus, dry thine eyes.

23

III,1,1298

Which of your hands hath not defended Rome,
And rear'd aloft the bloody battle-axe,...

24

III,1,1307

My hand shall go.

25

III,1,1313

And, for our father's sake and mother's care,
Now let me show a brother's love to thee.

26

III,1,1317

But I will use the axe.

27

III,1,1353

O brother, speak with possibilities,
And do not break into these deep extremes.

28

III,1,1357

But yet let reason govern thy lament.TITUS ANDRONICUS. If there were reason for these miseries,
Then into limits could I bind my woes:...

29

III,1,1381

Now let hot AEtna cool in Sicily,
And be my heart an ever-burning hell!...

30

III,1,1391

Alas, poor heart, that kiss is comfortless
As frozen water to a starved snake.

31

III,1,1394

Now, farewell, flattery: die, Andronicus;
Thou dost not slumber: see, thy two sons' heads,...

32

III,1,1406

Why dost thou laugh? it fits not with this hour.

33

III,2,1466

Fie, brother, fie! teach her not thus to lay
Such violent hands upon her tender life.

34

III,2,1493

Alas, the tender boy, in passion moved,
Doth weep to see his grandsire's heaviness.

35

III,2,1499

At that that I have kill'd, my lord; a fly.

36

III,2,1505

Alas, my lord, I have but kill'd a fly.

37

III,2,1513

Pardon me, sir; it was a black ill-favor'd fly,
Like to the empress' Moor; therefore I kill'd him.

38

III,2,1526

Alas, poor man! grief has so wrought on him,
He takes false shadows for true substances.

39

IV,1,1541

Stand by me, Lucius; do not fear thine aunt.

40

IV,1,1544

What means my niece Lavinia by these signs?

41

IV,1,1551

Canst thou not guess wherefore she plies thee thus?

42

IV,1,1565

Lucius, I will.
[LAVINIA turns over with her stumps the books which]...

43

IV,1,1576

I think she means that there was more than one
Confederate in the fact: ay, more there was;...

44

IV,1,1582

For love of her that's gone,
Perhaps she cull'd it from among the rest.

45

IV,1,1590

See, brother, see; note how she quotes the leaves.

46

IV,1,1598

O, why should nature build so foul a den,
Unless the gods delight in tragedies?

47

IV,1,1605

Sit down, sweet niece: brother, sit down by me.
Apollo, Pallas, Jove, or Mercury,...

48

IV,1,1623

What, what! the lustful sons of Tamora
Performers of this heinous, bloody deed?

49

IV,1,1627

O, calm thee, gentle lord; although I know
There is enough written upon this earth...

50

IV,1,1654

Ay, that's my boy! thy father hath full oft
For his ungrateful country done the like.

51

IV,1,1668

O heavens, can you hear a good man groan,
And not relent, or not compassion him?...

52

IV,3,1906

O Publius, is not this a heavy case,
To see thy noble uncle thus distract?

53

IV,3,1912

Kinsmen, his sorrows are past remedy.
Join with the Goths; and with revengeful war...

54

IV,3,1943

Kinsmen, shoot all your shafts into the court:
We will afflict the emperor in his pride.

55

IV,3,1949

My lord, I aim a mile beyond the moon;
Your letter is with Jupiter by this.

56

IV,3,1954

This was the sport, my lord: when Publius shot,
The Bull, being gall'd, gave Aries such a knock...

57

IV,3,1980

Why, sir, that is as fit as can be to serve for
your oration; and let him deliver the pigeons to...

58

V,2,2440

This will I do, and soon return again.

59

V,3,2547

Rome's emperor, and nephew, break the parle;
These quarrels must be quietly debated....

60

V,3,2605

You sad-faced men, people and sons of Rome,
By uproar sever'd, like a flight of fowl...

61

V,3,2658

Now is my turn to speak. Behold this child:
[Pointing to the Child in the arms of an Attendant]...

62

V,3,2682

Go, go into old Titus' sorrowful house,
[To Attendants]...

63

V,3,2700

Tear for tear, and loving kiss for kiss,
Thy brother Marcus tenders on thy lips:...

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