Speeches (Lines) for Miranda
in "Tempest"

Total: 49

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,85

If by your art, my dearest father, you have
Put the wild waters in this roar, allay them....

2

I,2,101

O, woe the day!

3

I,2,109

More to know
Did never meddle with my thoughts.

4

I,2,124

You have often
Begun to tell me what I am, but stopp'd...

5

I,2,134

Certainly, sir, I can.

6

I,2,138

'Tis far off
And rather like a dream than an assurance...

7

I,2,147

But that I do not.

8

I,2,151

Sir, are not you my father?

9

I,2,156

O the heavens!
What foul play had we, that we came from thence?...

10

I,2,162

O, my heart bleeds
To think o' the teen that I have turn'd you to,...

11

I,2,178

Sir, most heedfully.

12

I,2,188

O, good sir, I do.

13

I,2,208

Your tale, sir, would cure deafness.

14

I,2,219

O the heavens!

15

I,2,222

I should sin
To think but nobly of my grandmother:...

16

I,2,238

Alack, for pity!
I, not remembering how I cried out then,...

17

I,2,246

Wherefore did they not
That hour destroy us?

18

I,2,261

Alack, what trouble
Was I then to you!

19

I,2,270

How came we ashore?

20

I,2,281

Would I might
But ever see that man!

21

I,2,290

Heavens thank you for't! And now, I pray you, sir,
For still 'tis beating in my mind, your reason...

22

I,2,448

The strangeness of your story put
Heaviness in me.

23

I,2,453

'Tis a villain, sir,
I do not love to look on.

24

I,2,574

What is't? a spirit?
Lord, how it looks about! Believe me, sir,...

25

I,2,583

I might call him
A thing divine, for nothing natural...

26

I,2,596

No wonder, sir;
But certainly a maid.

27

I,2,608

Alack, for mercy!

28

I,2,619

Why speaks my father so ungently? This
Is the third man that e'er I saw, the first...

29

I,2,638

There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple:
If the ill spirit have so fair a house,...

30

I,2,651

O dear father,
Make not too rash a trial of him, for...

31

I,2,660

Beseech you, father.

32

I,2,662

Sir, have pity;
I'll be his surety.

33

I,2,671

My affections
Are then most humble; I have no ambition...

34

I,2,694

Be of comfort;
My father's of a better nature, sir,...

35

III,1,1294

Alas, now, pray you,
Work not so hard: I would the lightning had...

36

III,1,1304

If you'll sit down,
I'll bear your logs the while: pray, give me that;...

37

III,1,1311

It would become me
As well as it does you: and I should do it...

38

III,1,1317

You look wearily.

39

III,1,1322

Miranda.—O my father,
I have broke your hest to say so!

40

III,1,1336

I do not know
One of my sex; no woman's face remember,...

41

III,1,1357

Do you love me?

42

III,1,1364

I am a fool
To weep at what I am glad of.

43

III,1,1370

At mine unworthiness that dare not offer
What I desire to give, and much less take...

44

III,1,1382

My husband, then?

45

III,1,1385

And mine, with my heart in't; and now farewell
Till half an hour hence.

46

IV,1,1875

Never till this day
Saw I him touch'd with anger so distemper'd.

47

V,1,2218

Sweet lord, you play me false.

48

V,1,2221

Yes, for a score of kingdoms you should wrangle,
And I would call it, fair play.

49

V,1,2233

O, wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!...

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