Speeches (Lines) for Pompey
in "Measure for Measure"

Total: 60

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,177

Yonder man is carried to prison.

2

I,2,179

A woman.

3

I,2,181

Groping for trouts in a peculiar river.

4

I,2,183

No, but there's a woman with maid by him. You have
not heard of the proclamation, have you?

5

I,2,186

All houses in the suburbs of Vienna must be plucked down.

6

I,2,188

They shall stand for seed: they had gone down too,
but that a wise burgher put in for them.

7

I,2,192

To the ground, mistress.

8

I,2,195

Come; fear you not: good counsellors lack no
clients: though you change your place, you need not...

9

I,2,202

Here comes Signior Claudio, led by the provost to
prison; and there's Madam Juliet.

10

II,1,515

He cannot, sir; he's out at elbow.

11

II,1,536

Sir, if it please your honour, this is not so.

12

II,1,540

Sir, she came in great with child; and longing,
saving your honour's reverence, for stewed prunes;...

13

II,1,548

No, indeed, sir, not of a pin; you are therein in
the right: but to the point. As I say, this...

14

II,1,558

Very well: you being then, if you be remembered,
cracking the stones of the foresaid prunes,—

15

II,1,561

Why, very well; I telling you then, if you be
remembered, that such a one and such a one were past...

16

II,1,566

Why, very well, then,—

17

II,1,570

Sir, your honour cannot come to that yet.

18

II,1,572

Sir, but you shall come to it, by your honour's
leave. And, I beseech you, look into Master Froth...

19

II,1,578

Why, very well; I hope here be truths. He, sir,
sitting, as I say, in a lower chair, sir; 'twas in...

20

II,1,583

Why, very well, then; I hope here be truths.

21

II,1,591

Once, sir? there was nothing done to her once.

22

II,1,593

I beseech your honour, ask me.

23

II,1,595

I beseech you, sir, look in this gentleman's face.
Good Master Froth, look upon his honour; 'tis for a...

24

II,1,599

Nay; I beseech you, mark it well.

25

II,1,601

Doth your honour see any harm in his face?

26

II,1,603

I'll be supposed upon a book, his face is the worst
thing about him. Good, then; if his face be the...

27

II,1,612

By this hand, sir, his wife is a more respected
person than any of us all.

28

II,1,617

Sir, she was respected with him before he married with her.

29

II,1,642

Tapster; a poor widow's tapster.

30

II,1,644

Mistress Overdone.

31

II,1,646

Nine, sir; Overdone by the last.

32

II,1,659

Pompey.

33

II,1,661

Bum, sir.

34

II,1,667

Truly, sir, I am a poor fellow that would live.

35

II,1,670

If the law would allow it, sir.

36

II,1,673

Does your worship mean to geld and splay all the
youth of the city?

37

II,1,676

Truly, sir, in my poor opinion, they will to't then.
If your worship will take order for the drabs and...

38

II,1,681

If you head and hang all that offend that way but
for ten year together, you'll be glad to give out a...

39

II,1,694

I thank your worship for your good counsel:
[Aside]...

40

III,2,1518

'Twas never merry world since, of two usuries, the
merriest was put down, and the worser allowed by...

41

III,2,1539

Indeed, it does stink in some sort, sir; but yet,
sir, I would prove—

42

III,2,1552

I spy comfort; I cry bail. Here's a gentleman and a
friend of mine.

43

III,2,1568

Troth, sir, she hath eaten up all her beef, and she
is herself in the tub.

44

III,2,1574

Yes, faith, sir.

45

III,2,1584

I hope, sir, your good worship will be my bail.

46

III,2,1592

You will not bail me, then, sir?

47

IV,2,1887

If the man be a bachelor, sir, I can; but if he be a
married man, he's his wife's head, and I can never...

48

IV,2,1899

Sir, I have been an unlawful bawd time out of mind;
but yet I will be content to be a lawful hangman. I...

49

IV,2,1915

Pray, sir, by your good favour,—for surely, sir, a
good favour you have, but that you have a hanging...

50

IV,2,1919

Painting, sir, I have heard say, is a mystery; and
your whores, sir, being members of my occupation,...

51

IV,2,1925

Proof?

52

IV,2,1933

Sir, I will serve him; for I do find your hangman is
a more penitent trade than your bawd; he doth...

53

IV,2,1939

I do desire to learn, sir: and I hope, if you have
occasion to use me for your own turn, you shall find...

54

IV,3,2117

I am as well acquainted here as I was in our house
of profession: one would think it were Mistress...

55

IV,3,2138

Master Barnardine! you must rise and be hanged.
Master Barnardine!

56

IV,3,2143

Your friends, sir; the hangman. You must be so
good, sir, to rise and be put to death.

57

IV,3,2147

Pray, Master Barnardine, awake till you are
executed, and sleep afterwards.

58

IV,3,2150

He is coming, sir, he is coming; I hear his straw rustle.

59

IV,3,2152

Very ready, sir.

60

IV,3,2159

O, the better, sir; for he that drinks all night,
and is hanged betimes in the morning, may sleep the...

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