Speeches (Lines) for King Richard II
in "Richard II"

Total: 98

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,3

Old John of Gaunt, time-honour'd Lancaster,
Hast thou, according to thy oath and band,...

2

I,1,10

Tell me, moreover, hast thou sounded him,
If he appeal the duke on ancient malice;...

3

I,1,17

Then call them to our presence; face to face,
And frowning brow to brow, ourselves will hear...

4

I,1,28

We thank you both: yet one but flatters us,
As well appeareth by the cause you come;...

5

I,1,87

What doth our cousin lay to Mowbray's charge?
It must be great that can inherit us...

6

I,1,112

How high a pitch his resolution soars!
Thomas of Norfolk, what say'st thou to this?

7

I,1,118

Mowbray, impartial are our eyes and ears:
Were he my brother, nay, my kingdom's heir,...

8

I,1,155

Wrath-kindled gentlemen, be ruled by me;
Let's purge this choler without letting blood:...

9

I,1,165

And, Norfolk, throw down his.

10

I,1,168

Norfolk, throw down, we bid; there is no boot.

11

I,1,178

Rage must be withstood:
Give me his gage: lions make leopards tame.

12

I,1,191

Cousin, throw up your gage; do you begin.

13

I,1,202

We were not born to sue, but to command;
Which since we cannot do to make you friends,...

14

I,3,300

Marshal, demand of yonder champion
The cause of his arrival here in arms:...

15

I,3,321

Marshal, ask yonder knight in arms,
Both who he is and why he cometh hither...

16

I,3,349

We will descend and fold him in our arms.
Cousin of Hereford, as thy cause is right,...

17

I,3,392

Farewell, my lord: securely I espy
Virtue with valour couched in thine eye....

18

I,3,415

Let them lay by their helmets and their spears,
And both return back to their chairs again:...

19

I,3,445

Norfolk, for thee remains a heavier doom,
Which I with some unwillingness pronounce:...

20

I,3,471

It boots thee not to be compassionate:
After our sentence plaining comes too late.

21

I,3,475

Return again, and take an oath with thee.
Lay on our royal sword your banish'd hands;...

22

I,3,506

Uncle, even in the glasses of thine eyes
I see thy grieved heart: thy sad aspect...

23

I,3,525

Why uncle, thou hast many years to live.

24

I,3,533

Thy son is banish'd upon good advice,
Whereto thy tongue a party-verdict gave:...

25

I,3,547

Cousin, farewell; and, uncle, bid him so:
Six years we banish him, and he shall go.

26

I,4,614

We did observe. Cousin Aumerle,
How far brought you high Hereford on his way?

27

I,4,618

And say, what store of parting tears were shed?

28

I,4,623

What said our cousin when you parted with him?

29

I,4,633

He is our cousin, cousin; but 'tis doubt,
When time shall call him home from banishment,...

30

I,4,655

We will ourself in person to this war:
And, for our coffers, with too great a court...

31

I,4,671

Where lies he?

32

I,4,673

Now put it, God, in the physician's mind
To help him to his grave immediately!...

33

II,1,756

What comfort, man? how is't with aged Gaunt?

34

II,1,768

Can sick men play so nicely with their names?

35

II,1,772

Should dying men flatter with those that live?

36

II,1,774

Thou, now a-dying, say'st thou flatterest me.

37

II,1,776

I am in health, I breathe, and see thee ill.

38

II,1,799

A lunatic lean-witted fool,
Presuming on an ague's privilege,...

39

II,1,824

And let them die that age and sullens have;
For both hast thou, and both become the grave.

40

II,1,830

Right, you say true: as Hereford's love, so his;
As theirs, so mine; and all be as it is.

41

II,1,834

What says he?

42

II,1,840

The ripest fruit first falls, and so doth he;
His time is spent, our pilgrimage must be....

43

II,1,873

Why, uncle, what's the matter?

44

II,1,897

Think what you will, we seize into our hands
His plate, his goods, his money and his lands.

45

II,1,904

Go, Bushy, to the Earl of Wiltshire straight:
Bid him repair to us to Ely House...

46

III,2,1409

Barkloughly castle call they this at hand?

47

III,2,1412

Needs must I like it well: I weep for joy
To stand upon my kingdom once again....

48

III,2,1444

Discomfortable cousin! know'st thou not
That when the searching eye of heaven is hid,...

49

III,2,1485

But now the blood of twenty thousand men
Did triumph in my face, and they are fled;...

50

III,2,1492

I had forgot myself; am I not king?
Awake, thou coward majesty! thou sleepest....

51

III,2,1503

Mine ear is open and my heart prepared;
The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold....

52

III,2,1531

Too well, too well thou tell'st a tale so ill.
Where is the Earl of Wiltshire? where is Bagot?...

53

III,2,1539

O villains, vipers, damn'd without redemption!
Dogs, easily won to fawn on any man!...

54

III,2,1554

No matter where; of comfort no man speak:
Let's talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs;...

55

III,2,1598

Thou chidest me well: proud Bolingbroke, I come
To change blows with thee for our day of doom....

56

III,2,1614

Thou hast said enough.
Beshrew thee, cousin, which didst lead me forth...

57

III,2,1628

He does me double wrong
That wounds me with the flatteries of his tongue....

58

III,3,1712

We are amazed; and thus long have we stood
To watch the fearful bending of thy knee,...

59

III,3,1762

Northumberland, say thus the king returns:
His noble cousin is right welcome hither;...

60

III,3,1775

O God, O God! that e'er this tongue of mine,
That laid the sentence of dread banishment...

61

III,3,1785

What must the king do now? must he submit?
The king shall do it: must he be deposed?...

62

III,3,1820

Down, down I come; like glistering Phaethon,
Wanting the manage of unruly jades....

63

III,3,1838

Fair cousin, you debase your princely knee
To make the base earth proud with kissing it:...

64

III,3,1845

Your own is yours, and I am yours, and all.

65

III,3,1848

Well you deserve: they well deserve to have,
That know the strong'st and surest way to get....

66

III,3,1858

Then I must not say no.

67

IV,1,2150

Alack, why am I sent for to a king,
Before I have shook off the regal thoughts...

68

IV,1,2169

Give me the crown. Here, cousin, seize the crown;
Here cousin:...

69

IV,1,2179

My crown I am; but still my griefs are mine:
You may my glories and my state depose,...

70

IV,1,2183

Your cares set up do not pluck my cares down.
My care is loss of care, by old care done;...

71

IV,1,2189

Ay, no; no, ay; for I must nothing be;
Therefore no no, for I resign to thee....

72

IV,1,2217

Must I do so? and must I ravel out
My weaved-up folly? Gentle Northumberland,...

73

IV,1,2233

Mine eyes are full of tears, I cannot see:
And yet salt water blinds them not so much...

74

IV,1,2243

No lord of thine, thou haught insulting man,
Nor no man's lord; I have no name, no title,...

75

IV,1,2260

Fiend, thou torment'st me ere I come to hell!

76

IV,1,2263

They shall be satisfied: I'll read enough,
When I do see the very book indeed...

77

IV,1,2286

Say that again.
The shadow of my sorrow! ha! let's see:...

78

IV,1,2299

'Fair cousin'? I am greater than a king:
For when I was a king, my flatterers...

79

IV,1,2305

And shall I have?

80

IV,1,2307

Then give me leave to go.

81

IV,1,2309

Whither you will, so I were from your sights.

82

IV,1,2311

O, good! convey? conveyers are you all,
That rise thus nimbly by a true king's fall.

83

V,1,2350

Join not with grief, fair woman, do not so,
To make my end too sudden: learn, good soul,...

84

V,1,2369

A king of beasts, indeed; if aught but beasts,
I had been still a happy king of men....

85

V,1,2390

Northumberland, thou ladder wherewithal
The mounting Bolingbroke ascends my throne,...

86

V,1,2406

Doubly divorced! Bad men, you violate
A twofold marriage, 'twixt my crown and me,...

87

V,1,2417

Ay, hand from hand, my love, and heart from heart.

88

V,1,2421

So two, together weeping, make one woe.
Weep thou for me in France, I for thee here;...

89

V,1,2426

Twice for one step I'll groan, the way being short,
And piece the way out with a heavy heart....

90

V,1,2436

We make woe wanton with this fond delay:
Once more, adieu; the rest let sorrow say.

91

V,5,2749

I have been studying how I may compare
This prison where I live unto the world:...

92

V,5,2818

Thanks, noble peer;
The cheapest of us is ten groats too dear....

93

V,5,2832

Rode he on Barbary? Tell me, gentle friend,
How went he under him?

94

V,5,2835

So proud that Bolingbroke was on his back!
That jade hath eat bread from my royal hand;...

95

V,5,2848

If thou love me, 'tis time thou wert away.

96

V,5,2852

Taste of it first, as thou art wont to do.

97

V,5,2855

The devil take Henry of Lancaster and thee!
Patience is stale, and I am weary of it.

98

V,5,2860

How now! what means death in this rude assault?
Villain, thy own hand yields thy death's instrument....

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