Speeches (Lines) for Stephano
in "Tempest"

Total: 60

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,1131

I shall no more to sea, to sea,
Here shall I die ashore—...

2

II,2,1148

What's the matter? Have we devils here? Do you put
tricks upon's with savages and men of Ind, ha? I...

3

II,2,1156

This is some monster of the isle with four legs, who
hath got, as I take it, an ague. Where the devil...

4

II,2,1163

He's in his fit now and does not talk after the
wisest. He shall taste of my bottle: if he have...

5

II,2,1171

Come on your ways; open your mouth; here is that
which will give language to you, cat: open your...

6

II,2,1178

Four legs and two voices: a most delicate monster!
His forward voice now is to speak well of his...

7

II,2,1185

Doth thy other mouth call me? Mercy, mercy! This is
a devil, and no monster: I will leave him; I have no...

8

II,2,1191

If thou beest Trinculo, come forth: I'll pull thee
by the lesser legs: if any be Trinculo's legs,...

9

II,2,1202

Prithee, do not turn me about; my stomach is not constant.

10

II,2,1207

How didst thou 'scape? How camest thou hither?
swear by this bottle how thou camest hither. I...

11

II,2,1215

Here; swear then how thou escapedst.

12

II,2,1218

Here, kiss the book. Though thou canst swim like a
duck, thou art made like a goose.

13

II,2,1221

The whole butt, man: my cellar is in a rock by the
sea-side where my wine is hid. How now, moon-calf!...

14

II,2,1225

Out o' the moon, I do assure thee: I was the man i'
the moon when time was.

15

II,2,1229

Come, swear to that; kiss the book: I will furnish
it anon with new contents swear.

16

II,2,1240

Come on then; down, and swear.

17

II,2,1244

Come, kiss.

18

II,2,1259

I prithee now, lead the way without any more
talking. Trinculo, the king and all our company...

19

II,2,1275

O brave monster! Lead the way.

20

III,2,1396

Tell not me; when the butt is out, we will drink
water; not a drop before: therefore bear up, and...

21

III,2,1403

Drink, servant-monster, when I bid thee: thy eyes
are almost set in thy head.

22

III,2,1407

My man-monster hath drown'd his tongue in sack:
for my part, the sea cannot drown me; I swam, ere I...

23

III,2,1413

We'll not run, Monsieur Monster.

24

III,2,1416

Moon-calf, speak once in thy life, if thou beest a
good moon-calf.

25

III,2,1428

Trinculo, keep a good tongue in your head: if you
prove a mutineer,—the next tree! The poor monster's...

26

III,2,1433

Marry, will I. kneel and repeat it; I will stand,
and so shall Trinculo.

27

III,2,1441

Trinculo, if you trouble him any more in's tale, by
this hand, I will supplant some of your teeth.

28

III,2,1444

Mum, then, and no more. Proceed.

29

III,2,1449

That's most certain.

30

III,2,1451

How now shall this be compassed?
Canst thou bring me to the party?

31

III,2,1461

Trinculo, run into no further danger:
interrupt the monster one word further, and,...

32

III,2,1467

Didst thou not say he lied?

33

III,2,1469

Do I so? take thou that.
[Beats TRINCULO]...

34

III,2,1477

Now, forward with your tale. Prithee, stand farther
off.

35

III,2,1481

Stand farther. Come, proceed.

36

III,2,1499

Is it so brave a lass?

37

III,2,1502

Monster, I will kill this man: his daughter and I
will be king and queen—save our graces!—and...

38

III,2,1507

Give me thy hand: I am sorry I beat thee; but,
while thou livest, keep a good tongue in thy head.

39

III,2,1511

Ay, on mine honour.

40

III,2,1516

At thy request, monster, I will do reason, any
reason. Come on, Trinculo, let us sing....

41

III,2,1524

What is this same?

42

III,2,1527

If thou beest a man, show thyself in thy likeness:
if thou beest a devil, take't as thou list.

43

III,2,1530

He that dies pays all debts: I defy thee. Mercy upon us!

44

III,2,1532

No, monster, not I.

45

III,2,1542

This will prove a brave kingdom to me, where I shall
have my music for nothing.

46

III,2,1545

That shall be by and by: I remember the story.

47

III,2,1548

Lead, monster; we'll follow. I would I could see
this tabourer; he lays it on.

48

IV,1,1939

Monster, your fairy, which you say is
a harmless fairy, has done little better than...

49

IV,1,1944

So is mine. Do you hear, monster? If I should take
a displeasure against you, look you,—

50

IV,1,1952

There is not only disgrace and dishonour in that,
monster, but an infinite loss.

51

IV,1,1956

I will fetch off my bottle, though I be o'er ears
for my labour.

52

IV,1,1963

Give me thy hand. I do begin to have bloody thoughts.

53

IV,1,1969

Put off that gown, Trinculo; by this hand, I'll have
that gown.

54

IV,1,1977

Be you quiet, monster. Mistress line,
is not this my jerkin? Now is the jerkin under...

55

IV,1,1982

I thank thee for that jest; here's a garment for't:
wit shall not go unrewarded while I am king of this...

56

IV,1,1991

Monster, lay-to your fingers: help to bear this
away where my hogshead of wine is, or I'll turn you...

57

IV,1,1995

Ay, and this.
[A noise of hunters heard. Enter divers Spirits,]...

58

V,1,2328

Every man shift for all the rest, and
let no man take care for himself; for all is...

59

V,1,2361

O, touch me not; I am not Stephano, but a cramp.

60

V,1,2363

I should have been a sore one then.

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