Speeches (Lines) for Theseus
in "Midsummer Night's Dream"

Total: 48

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,2

Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hour
Draws on apace; four happy days bring in...

2

I,1,13

Go, Philostrate,
Stir up the Athenian youth to merriments;...

3

I,1,25

Thanks, good Egeus: what's the news with thee?

4

I,1,50

What say you, Hermia? be advised fair maid:
To you your father should be as a god;...

5

I,1,58

In himself he is;
But in this kind, wanting your father's voice,...

6

I,1,62

Rather your eyes must with his judgment look.

7

I,1,70

Either to die the death or to abjure
For ever the society of men....

8

I,1,88

Take time to pause; and, by the nest new moon—
The sealing-day betwixt my love and me,...

9

I,1,116

I must confess that I have heard so much,
And with Demetrius thought to have spoke thereof;...

10

IV,1,1657

Go, one of you, find out the forester;
For now our observation is perform'd;...

11

IV,1,1674

My hounds are bred out of the Spartan kind,
So flew'd, so sanded, and their heads are hung...

12

IV,1,1687

No doubt they rose up early to observe
The rite of May, and hearing our intent,...

13

IV,1,1693

Go, bid the huntsmen wake them with their horns.
[Horns and shout within. LYSANDER, DEMETRIUS,]...

14

IV,1,1699

I pray you all, stand up.
I know you two are rival enemies:...

15

IV,1,1735

Fair lovers, you are fortunately met:
Of this discourse we more will hear anon....

16

V,1,1832

More strange than true: I never may believe
These antique fables, nor these fairy toys....

17

V,1,1858

Here come the lovers, full of joy and mirth.
[Enter LYSANDER, DEMETRIUS, HERMIA, and HELENA]...

18

V,1,1864

Come now; what masques, what dances shall we have,
To wear away this long age of three hours...

19

V,1,1872

Say, what abridgement have you for this evening?
What masque? what music? How shall we beguile...

20

V,1,1878

[Reads] 'The battle with the Centaurs, to be sung
By an Athenian eunuch to the harp.'...

21

V,1,1908

What are they that do play it?

22

V,1,1913

And we will hear it.

23

V,1,1920

I will hear that play;
For never anything can be amiss,...

24

V,1,1927

Why, gentle sweet, you shall see no such thing.

25

V,1,1929

The kinder we, to give them thanks for nothing.
Our sport shall be to take what they mistake:...

26

V,1,1948

Let him approach.

27

V,1,1961

This fellow doth not stand upon points.

28

V,1,1967

His speech, was like a tangled chain; nothing
impaired, but all disordered. Who is next?

29

V,1,1996

I wonder if the lion be to speak.

30

V,1,2008

Would you desire lime and hair to speak better?

31

V,1,2012

Pyramus draws near the wall: silence!

32

V,1,2026

The wall, methinks, being sensible, should curse again.

33

V,1,2052

Now is the mural down between the two neighbours.

34

V,1,2056

The best in this kind are but shadows; and the worst
are no worse, if imagination amend them.

35

V,1,2059

If we imagine no worse of them than they of
themselves, they may pass for excellent men. Here...

36

V,1,2071

A very gentle beast, of a good conscience.

37

V,1,2074

True; and a goose for his discretion.

38

V,1,2077

His discretion, I am sure, cannot carry his valour;
for the goose carries not the fox. It is well:...

39

V,1,2082

He is no crescent, and his horns are
invisible within the circumference.

40

V,1,2086

This is the greatest error of all the rest: the man
should be put into the lanthorn. How is it else the...

41

V,1,2092

It appears, by his small light of discretion, that
he is in the wane; but yet, in courtesy, in all...

42

V,1,2106

Well run, Thisbe.

43

V,1,2110

Well moused, Lion.

44

V,1,2130

This passion, and the death of a dear friend, would
go near to make a man look sad.

45

V,1,2155

With the help of a surgeon he might yet recover, and
prove an ass.

46

V,1,2159

She will find him by starlight. Here she comes; and
her passion ends the play.

47

V,1,2195

Moonshine and Lion are left to bury the dead.

48

V,1,2201

No epilogue, I pray you; for your play needs no
excuse. Never excuse; for when the players are all...

Return to the "Midsummer Night's Dream" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS