Speeches (Lines) for Timon
in "Timon of Athens"

Total: 210

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,119

Imprison'd is he, say you?

2

I,1,125

Noble Ventidius! Well;
I am not of that feather to shake off...

3

I,1,132

Commend me to him: I will send his ransom;
And being enfranchised, bid him come to me....

4

I,1,140

Freely, good father.

5

I,1,142

I have so: what of him?

6

I,1,144

Attends he here, or no? Lucilius!

7

I,1,151

Well; what further?

8

I,1,160

The man is honest.

9

I,1,164

Does she love him?

10

I,1,168

[To LUCILIUS] Love you the maid?

11

I,1,174

How shall she be endow'd,
if she be mated with an equal husband?

12

I,1,177

This gentleman of mine hath served me long:
To build his fortune I will strain a little,...

13

I,1,184

My hand to thee; mine honour on my promise.

14

I,1,190

I thank you; you shall hear from me anon:
Go not away. What have you there, my friend?

15

I,1,194

Painting is welcome.
The painting is almost the natural man;...

16

I,1,202

Well fare you, gentleman: give me your hand;
We must needs dine together. Sir, your jewel...

17

I,1,206

A more satiety of commendations.
If I should pay you for't as 'tis extoll'd,...

18

I,1,214

Well mock'd.

19

I,1,217

Look, who comes here: will you be chid?

20

I,1,221

Good morrow to thee, gentle Apemantus!

21

I,1,224

Why dost thou call them knaves? thou know'st them not.

22

I,1,226

Yes.

23

I,1,230

Thou art proud, Apemantus.

24

I,1,232

Whither art going?

25

I,1,234

That's a deed thou'lt die for.

26

I,1,236

How likest thou this picture, Apemantus?

27

I,1,238

Wrought he not well that painted it?

28

I,1,243

Wilt dine with me, Apemantus?

29

I,1,245

An thou shouldst, thou 'ldst anger ladies.

30

I,1,247

That's a lascivious apprehension.

31

I,1,249

How dost thou like this jewel, Apemantus?

32

I,1,252

What dost thou think 'tis worth?

33

I,1,267

What wouldst do then, Apemantus?

34

I,1,269

What, thyself?

35

I,1,271

Wherefore?

36

I,1,279

What trumpet's that?

37

I,1,282

Pray, entertain them; give them guide to us.
[Exeunt some Attendants]...

38

I,1,297

Right welcome, sir!
Ere we depart, we'll share a bounteous time...

39

I,2,345

O, by no means,
Honest Ventidius; you mistake my love:...

40

I,2,352

Nay, my lords,
[They all stand ceremoniously looking on TIMON]...

41

I,2,363

O, Apemantus, you are welcome.

42

I,2,367

Fie, thou'rt a churl; ye've got a humour there
Does not become a man: 'tis much to blame....

43

I,2,375

I take no heed of thee; thou'rt an Athenian,
therefore welcome: I myself would have no power;...

44

I,2,393

My lord, in heart; and let the health go round.

45

I,2,414

Captain Alcibiades, your heart's in the field now.

46

I,2,416

You had rather be at a breakfast of enemies than a
dinner of friends.

47

I,2,426

O, no doubt, my good friends, but the gods
themselves have provided that I shall have much help...

48

I,2,454

What means that trump?
[Enter a Servant]...

49

I,2,459

Ladies! what are their wills?

50

I,2,462

I pray, let them be admitted.

51

I,2,470

They're welcome all; let 'em have kind admittance:
Music, make their welcome!

52

I,2,495

You have done our pleasures much grace, fair ladies,
Set a fair fashion on our entertainment,...

53

I,2,504

Ladies, there is an idle banquet attends you:
Please you to dispose yourselves.

54

I,2,508

Flavius.

55

I,2,510

The little casket bring me hither.

56

I,2,523

O my friends,
I have one word to say to you: look you, my good lord,...

57

I,2,533

They are fairly welcome.

58

I,2,536

Near! why then, another time I'll hear thee:
I prithee, let's be provided to show them...

59

I,2,544

I shall accept them fairly; let the presents
Be worthily entertain'd....

60

I,2,552

I'll hunt with him; and let them be received,
Not without fair reward.

61

I,2,570

You do yourselves
Much wrong, you bate too much of your own merits:...

62

I,2,575

And now I remember, my lord, you gave
Good words the other day of a bay courser...

63

I,2,579

You may take my word, my lord; I know, no man
Can justly praise but what he does affect:...

64

I,2,584

I take all and your several visitations
So kind to heart, 'tis not enough to give;...

65

I,2,594

And so
Am I to you.

66

I,2,597

All to you. Lights, more lights!

67

I,2,600

Ready for his friends.

68

I,2,608

Now, Apemantus, if thou wert not sullen, I would be
good to thee.

69

I,2,616

Nay, an you begin to rail on society once, I am
sworn not to give regard to you. Farewell; and come...

70

II,2,687

So soon as dinner's done, we'll forth again,
My Alcibiades. With me? what is your will?

71

II,2,690

Dues! Whence are you?

72

II,2,692

Go to my steward.

73

II,2,699

Mine honest friend,
I prithee, but repair to me next morning.

74

II,2,702

Contain thyself, good friend.
He humbly prays your speedy payment.

75

II,2,710

Give me breath.
I do beseech you, good my lords, keep on;...

76

II,2,725

Do so, my friends. See them well entertain'd.

77

II,2,809

You make me marvel: wherefore ere this time
Had you not fully laid my state before me,...

78

II,2,815

Go to:
Perchance some single vantages you took....

79

II,2,834

Let all my land be sold.

80

II,2,840

To Lacedaemon did my land extend.

81

II,2,844

You tell me true.

82

II,2,854

Prithee, no more.

83

II,2,865

Come, sermon me no further:
No villanous bounty yet hath pass'd my heart;...

84

II,2,875

And, in some sort, these wants of mine are crown'd,
That I account them blessings; for by these...

85

II,2,882

I will dispatch you severally; you to Lord Lucius;
to Lord Lucullus you: I hunted with his honour...

86

II,2,890

Go you, sir, to the senators—
Of whom, even to the state's best health, I have...

87

II,2,899

Is't true? can't be?

88

II,2,910

You gods, reward them!
Prithee, man, look cheerly. These old fellows...

89

III,4,1257

What, are my doors opposed against my passage?
Have I been ever free, and must my house...

90

III,4,1269

Knock me down with 'em: cleave me to the girdle.

91

III,4,1271

Cut my heart in sums.

92

III,4,1273

Tell out my blood.

93

III,4,1275

Five thousand drops pays that.
What yours?—and yours?

94

III,4,1281

Tear me, take me, and the gods fall upon you!

95

III,4,1288

They have e'en put my breath from me, the slaves.
Creditors? devils!

96

III,4,1291

What if it should be so?

97

III,4,1293

I'll have it so. My steward!

98

III,4,1295

So fitly? Go, bid all my friends again,
Lucius, Lucullus, and Sempronius:...

99

III,4,1303

Be't not in thy care; go,
I charge thee, invite them all: let in the tide...

100

III,6,1462

With all my heart, gentlemen both; and how fare you?

101

III,6,1466

[Aside] Nor more willingly leaves winter; such
summer-birds are men. Gentlemen, our dinner will not...

102

III,6,1473

O, sir, let it not trouble you.

103

III,6,1475

Ah, my good friend, what cheer?

104

III,6,1479

Think not on 't, sir.

105

III,6,1481

Let it not cumber your better remembrance.
[The banquet brought in]...

106

III,6,1494

My worthy friends, will you draw near?

107

III,6,1500

Each man to his stool, with that spur as he would to
the lip of his mistress: your diet shall be in all...

108

III,6,1526

May you a better feast never behold,
You knot of mouth-friends I smoke and lukewarm water...

109

IV,1,1565

Let me look back upon thee. O thou wall,
That girdlest in those wolves, dive in the earth,...

110

IV,3,1664

O blessed breeding sun, draw from the earth
Rotten humidity; below thy sister's orb...

111

IV,3,1718

A beast, as thou art. The canker gnaw thy heart,
For showing me again the eyes of man!

112

IV,3,1722

I am Misanthropos, and hate mankind.
For thy part, I do wish thou wert a dog,...

113

IV,3,1727

I know thee too; and more than that I know thee,
I not desire to know. Follow thy drum;...

114

IV,3,1735

I will not kiss thee; then the rot returns
To thine own lips again.

115

IV,3,1738

As the moon does, by wanting light to give:
But then renew I could not, like the moon;...

116

IV,3,1743

None, but to
Maintain my opinion.

117

IV,3,1746

Promise me friendship, but perform none: if thou
wilt not promise, the gods plague thee, for thou art...

118

IV,3,1751

Thou saw'st them, when I had prosperity.

119

IV,3,1753

As thine is now, held with a brace of harlots.

120

IV,3,1756

Art thou Timandra?

121

IV,3,1758

Be a whore still: they love thee not that use thee;
Give them diseases, leaving with thee their lust....

122

IV,3,1772

I prithee, beat thy drum, and get thee gone.

123

IV,3,1774

How dost thou pity him whom thou dost trouble?
I had rather be alone.

124

IV,3,1778

Keep it, I cannot eat it.

125

IV,3,1780

Warr'st thou 'gainst Athens?

126

IV,3,1782

The gods confound them all in thy conquest;
And thee after, when thou hast conquer'd!

127

IV,3,1785

That, by killing of villains,
Thou wast born to conquer my country....

128

IV,3,1812

Dost thou, or dost thou not, heaven's curse
upon thee!

129

IV,3,1815

Enough to make a whore forswear her trade,
And to make whores, a bawd. Hold up, you sluts,...

130

IV,3,1832

Consumptions sow
In hollow bones of man; strike their sharp shins,...

131

IV,3,1850

More whore, more mischief first; I have given you earnest.

132

IV,3,1853

If I hope well, I'll never see thee more.

133

IV,3,1855

Yes, thou spokest well of me.

134

IV,3,1857

Men daily find it. Get thee away, and take
Thy beagles with thee.

135

IV,3,1862

That nature, being sick of man's unkindness,
Should yet be hungry! Common mother, thou,...

136

IV,3,1888

'Tis, then, because thou dost not keep a dog,
Whom I would imitate: consumption catch thee!

137

IV,3,1907

Were I like thee, I'ld throw away myself.

138

IV,3,1922

A fool of thee: depart.

139

IV,3,1924

I hate thee worse.

140

IV,3,1926

Thou flatter'st misery.

141

IV,3,1928

Why dost thou seek me out?

142

IV,3,1930

Always a villain's office or a fool's.
Dost please thyself in't?

143

IV,3,1933

What! a knave too?

144

IV,3,1944

Not by his breath that is more miserable.
Thou art a slave, whom Fortune's tender arm...

145

IV,3,1973

Ay, that I am not thee.

146

IV,3,1976

I, that I am one now:
Were all the wealth I have shut up in thee,...

147

IV,3,1984

First mend my company, take away thyself.

148

IV,3,1986

'Tis not well mended so, it is but botch'd;
if not, I would it were.

149

IV,3,1989

Thee thither in a whirlwind. If thou wilt,
Tell them there I have gold; look, so I have.

150

IV,3,1992

The best and truest;
For here it sleeps, and does no hired harm.

151

IV,3,1995

Under that's above me.
Where feed'st thou o' days, Apemantus?

152

IV,3,1999

Would poison were obedient and knew my mind!

153

IV,3,2001

To sauce thy dishes.

154

IV,3,2008

On what I hate I feed not.

155

IV,3,2010

Ay, though it look like thee.

156

IV,3,2014

Who, without those means thou talkest of, didst thou
ever know beloved?

157

IV,3,2017

I understand thee; thou hadst some means to keep a
dog.

158

IV,3,2021

Women nearest; but men, men are the things
themselves. What wouldst thou do with the world,...

159

IV,3,2025

Wouldst thou have thyself fall in the confusion of
men, and remain a beast with the beasts?

160

IV,3,2028

A beastly ambition, which the gods grant thee t'
attain to! If thou wert the lion, the fox would...

161

IV,3,2052

How has the ass broke the wall, that thou art out of the city?

162

IV,3,2057

When there is nothing living but thee, thou shalt be
welcome. I had rather be a beggar's dog than Apemantus.

163

IV,3,2060

Would thou wert clean enough to spit upon!

164

IV,3,2062

All villains that do stand by thee are pure.

165

IV,3,2064

If I name thee.
I'll beat thee, but I should infect my hands.

166

IV,3,2067

Away, thou issue of a mangy dog!
Choler does kill me that thou art alive;...

167

IV,3,2071

Away,
Thou tedious rogue! I am sorry I shall lose...

168

IV,3,2076

Slave!

169

IV,3,2078

Rogue, rogue, rogue!
I am sick of this false world, and will love nought...

170

IV,3,2102

Throng'd to!

171

IV,3,2104

Thy back, I prithee.

172

IV,3,2106

Long live so, and so die.
[Exit APEMANTUS]...

173

IV,3,2125

Now, thieves?

174

IV,3,2127

Both too; and women's sons.

175

IV,3,2129

Your greatest want is, you want much of meat.
Why should you want? Behold, the earth hath roots;...

176

IV,3,2137

Nor on the beasts themselves, the birds, and fishes;
You must eat men. Yet thanks I must you con...

177

IV,3,2187

Away! what art thou?

178

IV,3,2189

Why dost ask that? I have forgot all men;
Then, if thou grant'st thou'rt a man, I have forgot thee.

179

IV,3,2192

Then I know thee not:
I never had honest man about me, I; all...

180

IV,3,2198

What, dost thou weep? Come nearer. Then I
love thee,...

181

IV,3,2207

Had I a steward
So true, so just, and now so comfortable?...

182

IV,3,2240

Look thee, 'tis so! Thou singly honest man,
Here, take: the gods out of my misery...

183

IV,3,2254

If thou hatest curses,
Stay not; fly, whilst thou art blest and free:...

184

V,1,2290

[Aside] Excellent workman! thou canst not paint a
man so bad as is thyself.

185

V,1,2296

[Aside] Must thou needs stand for a villain in
thine own work? wilt thou whip thine own faults in...

186

V,1,2305

[Aside] I'll meet you at the turn. What a
god's gold,...

187

V,1,2317

Have I once lived to see two honest men?

188

V,1,2328

Let it go naked, men may see't the better:
You that are honest, by being what you are,...

189

V,1,2334

Ay, you are honest men.

190

V,1,2336

Most honest men! Why, how shall I requite you?
Can you eat roots, and drink cold water? no.

191

V,1,2339

Ye're honest men: ye've heard that I have gold;
I am sure you have: speak truth; ye're honest men.

192

V,1,2343

Good honest men! Thou draw'st a counterfeit
Best in all Athens: thou'rt, indeed, the best;...

193

V,1,2347

E'en so, sir, as I say. And, for thy fiction,
Why, thy verse swells with stuff so fine and smooth...

194

V,1,2356

You'll take it ill.

195

V,1,2358

Will you, indeed?

196

V,1,2360

There's never a one of you but trusts a knave,
That mightily deceives you.

197

V,1,2363

Ay, and you hear him cog, see him dissemble,
Know his gross patchery, love him, feed him,...

198

V,1,2369

Look you, I love you well; I'll give you gold,
Rid me these villains from your companies:...

199

V,1,2375

You that way and you this, but two in company;
Each man apart, all single and alone,...

200

V,1,2408

Thou sun, that comfort'st, burn! Speak, and
be hang'd:...

201

V,1,2414

Of none but such as you, and you of Timon.

202

V,1,2416

I thank them; and would send them back the plague,
Could I but catch it for them.

203

V,1,2437

You witch me in it;
Surprise me to the very brink of tears:...

204

V,1,2452

Well, sir, I will; therefore, I will, sir; thus:
If Alcibiades kill my countrymen,...

205

V,1,2470

Why, I was writing of my epitaph;
it will be seen to-morrow: my long sickness...

206

V,1,2477

But yet I love my country, and am not
One that rejoices in the common wreck,...

207

V,1,2481

Commend me to my loving countrymen,—

208

V,1,2486

Commend me to them,
And tell them that, to ease them of their griefs,...

209

V,1,2494

I have a tree, which grows here in my close,
That mine own use invites me to cut down,...

210

V,1,2503

Come not to me again: but say to Athens,
Timon hath made his everlasting mansion...

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