Speeches (Lines) for Ulysses
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 80

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,505

Agamemnon,
Thou great commander, nerve and bone of Greece,...

2

I,3,528

Troy, yet upon his basis, had been down,
And the great Hector's sword had lack'd a master,...

3

I,3,595

The great Achilles, whom opinion crowns
The sinew and the forehand of our host,...

4

I,3,650

They tax our policy, and call it cowardice,
Count wisdom as no member of the war,...

5

I,3,764

Amen.

6

I,3,772

Nestor!

7

I,3,774

I have a young conception in my brain;
Be you my time to bring it to some shape.

8

I,3,777

This 'tis:
Blunt wedges rive hard knots: the seeded pride...

9

I,3,784

This challenge that the gallant Hector sends,
However it is spread in general name,...

10

I,3,795

And wake him to the answer, think you?

11

I,3,820

Give pardon to my speech:
Therefore 'tis meet Achilles meet not Hector....

12

I,3,830

What glory our Achilles shares from Hector,
Were he not proud, we all should share with him:...

13

II,3,1301

We saw him at the opening of his tent:
He is not sick.

14

II,3,1309

Achilles hath inveigled his fool from him.

15

II,3,1311

He.

16

II,3,1313

No, you see, he is his argument that has his
argument, Achilles.

17

II,3,1318

The amity that wisdom knits not, folly may easily
untie. Here comes Patroclus.

18

II,3,1322

The elephant hath joints, but none for courtesy:
his legs are legs for necessity, not for flexure.

19

II,3,1383

Achilles will not to the field to-morrow.

20

II,3,1385

He doth rely on none,
But carries on the stream of his dispose...

21

II,3,1391

Things small as nothing, for request's sake only,
He makes important: possess'd he is with greatness,...

22

II,3,1404

O Agamemnon, let it not be so!
We'll consecrate the steps that Ajax makes...

23

II,3,1430

Not for the worth that hangs upon our quarrel.

24

II,3,1434

The raven chides blackness.

25

II,3,1438

Wit would be out of fashion.

26

II,3,1442

A' would have ten shares.

27

II,3,1446

[To AGAMEMNON] My lord, you feed too much on this dislike.

28

II,3,1449

Why, 'tis this naming of him does him harm.
Here is a man—but 'tis before his face;...

29

II,3,1454

Know the whole world, he is as valiant.

30

II,3,1458

If he were proud,—

31

II,3,1460

Ay, or surly borne,—

32

II,3,1462

Thank the heavens, lord, thou art of sweet composure;
Praise him that got thee, she that gave thee suck:...

33

II,3,1482

There is no tarrying here; the hart Achilles
Keeps thicket. Please it our great general...

34

III,3,1906

Achilles stands i' the entrance of his tent:
Please it our general to pass strangely by him,...

35

III,3,1967

Now, great Thetis' son!

36

III,3,1969

A strange fellow here
Writes me: 'That man, how dearly ever parted,...

37

III,3,1987

I do not strain at the position,—
It is familiar,—but at the author's drift;...

38

III,3,2021

Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back,
Wherein he puts alms for oblivion,...

39

III,3,2070

But 'gainst your privacy
The reasons are more potent and heroical:...

40

III,3,2075

Is that a wonder?
The providence that's in a watchful state...

41

IV,5,2608

No trumpet answers.

42

IV,5,2611

'Tis he, I ken the manner of his gait;
He rises on the toe: that spirit of his...

43

IV,5,2619

Yet is the kindness but particular;
'Twere better she were kiss'd in general.

44

IV,5,2629

O deadly gall, and theme of all our scorns!
For which we lose our heads to gild his horns.

45

IV,5,2648

It were no match, your nail against his horn.
May I, sweet lady, beg a kiss of you?

46

IV,5,2651

I do desire it.

47

IV,5,2653

Why then for Venus' sake, give me a kiss,
When Helen is a maid again, and his.

48

IV,5,2656

Never's my day, and then a kiss of you.

49

IV,5,2660

Fie, fie upon her!
There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip,...

50

IV,5,2709

They are opposed already.

51

IV,5,2711

The youngest son of Priam, a true knight,
Not yet mature, yet matchless, firm of word,...

52

IV,5,2835

I wonder now how yonder city stands
When we have here her base and pillar by us.

53

IV,5,2841

Sir, I foretold you then what would ensue:
My prophecy is but half his journey yet;...

54

IV,5,2852

So to him we leave it.
Most gentle and most valiant Hector, welcome:...

55

IV,5,2912

At Menelaus' tent, most princely Troilus:
There Diomed doth feast with him to-night;...

56

IV,5,2920

You shall command me, sir.
As gentle tell me, of what honour was...

57

V,1,3006

Here comes himself to guide you.

58

V,1,3025

[Aside to TROILUS] Follow his torch; he goes to
Calchas' tent:...

59

V,2,3052

Stand where the torch may not discover us.

60

V,2,3059

She will sing any man at first sight.

61

V,2,3067

List.

62

V,2,3080

How now, Trojan!

63

V,2,3086

You are moved, prince; let us depart, I pray you,
Lest your displeasure should enlarge itself...

64

V,2,3091

Nay, good my lord, go off:
You flow to great distraction; come, my lord.

65

V,2,3094

You have not patience; come.

66

V,2,3101

Why, how now, lord!

67

V,2,3107

You shake, my lord, at something: will you go?
You will break out.

68

V,2,3110

Come, come.

69

V,2,3121

You have sworn patience.

70

V,2,3129

My lord,—

71

V,2,3185

All's done, my lord.

72

V,2,3187

Why stay we, then?

73

V,2,3198

I cannot conjure, Trojan.

74

V,2,3200

Most sure she was.

75

V,2,3202

Nor mine, my lord: Cressid was here but now.

76

V,2,3208

What hath she done, prince, that can soil our mothers?

77

V,2,3235

May worthy Troilus be half attach'd
With that which here his passion doth express?

78

V,2,3255

O, contain yourself
Your passion draws ears hither.

79

V,2,3264

I'll bring you to the gates.

80

V,5,3487

O, courage, courage, princes! great Achilles
Is arming, weeping, cursing, vowing vengeance:...

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