Speeches (Lines) for First Clown
in "Hamlet"

Total: 34

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

V,1,3348

Is she to be buried in Christian burial when she wilfully seeks her own salvation?

2

V,1,3351

How can that be, unless she drown'd herself in her own
defence?

3

V,1,3354

It must be se offendendo; it cannot be else. For here lies
the point: if I drown myself wittingly, it argues an act; and an...

4

V,1,3359

Give me leave. Here lies the water; good. Here stands the
man; good. If the man go to this water and drown himself, it is,...

5

V,1,3365

Ay, marry, is't- crowner's quest law.

6

V,1,3368

Why, there thou say'st! And the more pity that great folk
should have count'nance in this world to drown or hang themselves...

7

V,1,3374

'A was the first that ever bore arms.

8

V,1,3376

What, art a heathen? How dost thou understand the Scripture?
The Scripture says Adam digg'd. Could he dig without arms? I'll...

9

V,1,3381

What is he that builds stronger than either the mason, the
shipwright, or the carpenter?

10

V,1,3385

I like thy wit well, in good faith. The gallows does well.
But how does it well? It does well to those that do ill. Now,...

11

V,1,3391

Ay, tell me that, and unyoke.

12

V,1,3393

To't.

13

V,1,3396

Cudgel thy brains no more about it, for your dull ass will
not mend his pace with beating; and when you are ask'd this...

14

V,1,3403

In youth when I did love, did love,
Methought it was very sweet;...

15

V,1,3412

[sings]
But age with his stealing steps...

16

V,1,3434

[Sings]
A pickaxe and a spade, a spade,...

17

V,1,3458

Mine, sir.
[Sings] O, a pit of clay for to be made...

18

V,1,3462

You lie out on't, sir, and therefore 'tis not yours.
For my part, I do not lie in't, yet it is mine.

19

V,1,3466

'Tis a quick lie, sir; 'twill away again from me to you.

20

V,1,3468

For no man, sir.

21

V,1,3470

For none neither.

22

V,1,3472

One that was a woman, sir; but, rest her soul, she's dead.

23

V,1,3478

Of all the days i' th' year, I came to't that day that our
last king Hamlet overcame Fortinbras.

24

V,1,3481

Cannot you tell that? Every fool can tell that. It was the
very day that young Hamlet was born- he that is mad, and sent...

25

V,1,3485

Why, because 'a was mad. 'A shall recover his wits there;
or, if 'a do not, 'tis no great matter there.

26

V,1,3488

'Twill not he seen in him there. There the men are as mad as
he.

27

V,1,3491

Very strangely, they say.

28

V,1,3493

Faith, e'en with losing his wits.

29

V,1,3495

Why, here in Denmark. I have been sexton here, man and boy
thirty years.

30

V,1,3498

Faith, if 'a be not rotten before 'a die (as we have many
pocky corses now-a-days that will scarce hold the laying in, I...

31

V,1,3503

Why, sir, his hide is so tann'd with his trade that 'a will
keep out water a great while; and your water is a sore decayer of...

32

V,1,3508

A whoreson, mad fellow's it was. Whose do you think it was?

33

V,1,3510

A pestilence on him for a mad rogue! 'A pour'd a flagon of
Rhenish on my head once. This same skull, sir, was Yorick's...

34

V,1,3514

E'en that.

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