Speeches (Lines) for Desdemona
in "Othello"

Total: 165

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,528

My noble father,
I do perceive here a divided duty:...

2

I,3,593

Nor I; I would not there reside,
To put my father in impatient thoughts...

3

I,3,600

That I did love the Moor to live with him,
My downright violence and storm of fortunes...

4

II,1,867

I thank you, valiant Cassio.
What tidings can you tell me of my lord?

5

II,1,871

O, but I fear—How lost you company?

6

II,1,889

Alas, she has no speech.

7

II,1,900

O, fie upon thee, slanderer!

8

II,1,905

What wouldst thou write of me, if thou shouldst
praise me?

9

II,1,909

Come on assay. There's one gone to the harbour?

10

II,1,911

I am not merry; but I do beguile
The thing I am, by seeming otherwise....

11

II,1,920

Well praised! How if she be black and witty?

12

II,1,923

Worse and worse.

13

II,1,927

These are old fond paradoxes to make fools laugh i'
the alehouse. What miserable praise hast thou for...

14

II,1,932

O heavy ignorance! thou praisest the worst best.
But what praise couldst thou bestow on a deserving...

15

II,1,947

To do what?

16

II,1,949

O most lame and impotent conclusion! Do not learn
of him, Emilia, though he be thy husband. How say...

17

II,1,969

Let's meet him and receive him.

18

II,1,973

My dear Othello!

19

II,1,985

The heavens forbid
But that our loves and comforts should increase,...

20

II,3,1403

What's the matter?

21

III,3,1626

Be thou assured, good Cassio, I will do
All my abilities in thy behalf.

22

III,3,1630

O, that's an honest fellow. Do not doubt, Cassio,
But I will have my lord and you again...

23

III,3,1636

I know't; I thank you. You do love my lord:
You have known him long; and be you well assured...

24

III,3,1646

Do not doubt that; before Emilia here
I give thee warrant of thy place: assure thee,...

25

III,3,1658

Why, stay, and hear me speak.

26

III,3,1661

Well, do your discretion.

27

III,3,1672

How now, my lord!
I have been talking with a suitor here,...

28

III,3,1676

Why, your lieutenant, Cassio. Good my lord,
If I have any grace or power to move you,...

29

III,3,1684

Ay, sooth; so humbled
That he hath left part of his grief with me,...

30

III,3,1688

But shall't be shortly?

31

III,3,1690

Shall't be to-night at supper?

32

III,3,1692

To-morrow dinner, then?

33

III,3,1695

Why, then, to-morrow night; or Tuesday morn;
On Tuesday noon, or night; on Wednesday morn:...

34

III,3,1712

Why, this is not a boon;
'Tis as I should entreat you wear your gloves,...

35

III,3,1723

Shall I deny you? no: farewell, my lord.

36

III,3,1725

Emilia, come. Be as your fancies teach you;
Whate'er you be, I am obedient.

37

III,3,1942

How now, my dear Othello!
Your dinner, and the generous islanders...

38

III,3,1946

Why do you speak so faintly?
Are you not well?

39

III,3,1949

'Faith, that's with watching; 'twill away again:
Let me but bind it hard, within this hour...

40

III,3,1955

I am very sorry that you are not well.

41

III,4,2174

Do you know, sirrah, where Lieutenant Cassio lies?

42

III,4,2176

Why, man?

43

III,4,2179

Go to: where lodges he?

44

III,4,2181

Can any thing be made of this?

45

III,4,2185

Can you inquire him out, and be edified by report?

46

III,4,2188

Seek him, bid him come hither: tell him I have
moved my lord on his behalf, and hope all will be well.

47

III,4,2193

Where should I lose that handkerchief, Emilia?

48

III,4,2195

Believe me, I had rather have lost my purse
Full of crusadoes: and, but my noble Moor...

49

III,4,2201

Who, he? I think the sun where he was born
Drew all such humours from him.

50

III,4,2204

I will not leave him now till Cassio
Be call'd to him....

51

III,4,2212

Well, my good lord.

52

III,4,2214

It yet hath felt no age nor known no sorrow.

53

III,4,2222

You may, indeed, say so;
For 'twas that hand that gave away my heart.

54

III,4,2226

I cannot speak of this. Come now, your promise.

55

III,4,2228

I have sent to bid Cassio come speak with you.

56

III,4,2231

Here, my lord.

57

III,4,2233

I have it not about me.

58

III,4,2235

No, indeed, my lord.

59

III,4,2252

Is't possible?

60

III,4,2260

Indeed! is't true?

61

III,4,2262

Then would to God that I had never seen't!

62

III,4,2264

Why do you speak so startingly and rash?

63

III,4,2267

Heaven bless us!

64

III,4,2269

It is not lost; but what an if it were?

65

III,4,2271

I say, it is not lost.

66

III,4,2273

Why, so I can, sir, but I will not now.
This is a trick to put me from my suit:...

67

III,4,2277

Come, come;
You'll never meet a more sufficient man.

68

III,4,2280

I pray, talk me of Cassio.

69

III,4,2282

A man that all his time
Hath founded his good fortunes on your love,...

70

III,4,2286

In sooth, you are to blame.

71

III,4,2290

I ne'er saw this before.
Sure, there's some wonder in this handkerchief:...

72

III,4,2300

How now, good Cassio! what's the news with you?

73

III,4,2314

Alas, thrice-gentle Cassio!
My advocation is not now in tune;...

74

III,4,2333

I prithee, do so.
[Exit IAGO]...

75

III,4,2353

Alas the day! I never gave him cause.

76

III,4,2358

Heaven keep that monster from Othello's mind!

77

III,4,2360

I will go seek him. Cassio, walk hereabout:
If I do find him fit, I'll move your suit...

78

IV,1,2655

And what's the news, good cousin Lodovico?

79

IV,1,2660

Cousin, there's fall'n between him and my lord
An unkind breach: but you shall make all well.

80

IV,1,2663

My lord?

81

IV,1,2667

A most unhappy one: I would do much
To atone them, for the love I bear to Cassio.

82

IV,1,2670

My lord?

83

IV,1,2672

What, is he angry?

84

IV,1,2676

Trust me, I am glad on't.

85

IV,1,2678

My lord?

86

IV,1,2680

Why, sweet Othello,—

87

IV,1,2682

I have not deserved this.

88

IV,1,2690

I will not stay to offend you.

89

IV,1,2695

My lord?

90

IV,2,2764

My lord, what is your will?

91

IV,2,2766

What is your pleasure?

92

IV,2,2769

What horrible fancy's this?

93

IV,2,2775

Upon my knees, what doth your speech import?
I understand a fury in your words....

94

IV,2,2779

Your wife, my lord; your true
And loyal wife.

95

IV,2,2785

Heaven doth truly know it.

96

IV,2,2787

To whom, my lord? with whom? how am I false?

97

IV,2,2789

Alas the heavy day! Why do you weep?
Am I the motive of these tears, my lord?...

98

IV,2,2813

I hope my noble lord esteems me honest.

99

IV,2,2819

Alas, what ignorant sin have I committed?

100

IV,2,2831

By heaven, you do me wrong.

101

IV,2,2833

No, as I am a Christian:
If to preserve this vessel for my lord...

102

IV,2,2838

No, as I shall be saved.

103

IV,2,2840

O, heaven forgive us!

104

IV,2,2855

'Faith, half asleep.

105

IV,2,2857

With who?

106

IV,2,2859

Who is thy lord?

107

IV,2,2861

I have none: do not talk to me, Emilia;
I cannot weep; nor answer have I none,...

108

IV,2,2868

'Tis meet I should be used so, very meet.
How have I been behaved, that he might stick...

109

IV,2,2874

I cannot tell. Those that do teach young babes
Do it with gentle means and easy tasks:...

110

IV,2,2882

Am I that name, Iago?

111

IV,2,2884

Such as she says my lord did say I was.

112

IV,2,2888

I do not know; I am sure I am none such.

113

IV,2,2893

It is my wretched fortune.

114

IV,2,2896

Nay, heaven doth know.

115

IV,2,2902

If any such there be, heaven pardon him!

116

IV,2,2917

O good Iago,
What shall I do to win my lord again?...

117

IV,2,2937

If 'twere no other—

118

IV,3,3022

Your honour is most welcome.

119

IV,3,3025

My lord?

120

IV,3,3028

I will, my lord.

121

IV,3,3031

He says he will return incontinent:
He hath commanded me to go to bed,...

122

IV,3,3035

It was his bidding: therefore, good Emilia,.
Give me my nightly wearing, and adieu:...

123

IV,3,3039

So would not I. my love doth so approve him,
That even his stubbornness, his cheques, his frowns—...

124

IV,3,3043

All's one. Good faith, how foolish are our minds!
If I do die before thee prithee, shroud me...

125

IV,3,3047

My mother had a maid call'd Barbara:
She was in love, and he she loved proved mad...

126

IV,3,3056

No, unpin me here.
This Lodovico is a proper man.

127

IV,3,3059

He speaks well.

128

IV,3,3062

[Singing] The poor soul sat sighing by a sycamore tree,
Sing all a green willow:...

129

IV,3,3078

[Singing] I call'd my love false love; but what
said he then?...

130

IV,3,3085

I have heard it said so. O, these men, these men!
Dost thou in conscience think,—tell me, Emilia,—...

131

IV,3,3090

Wouldst thou do such a deed for all the world?

132

IV,3,3092

No, by this heavenly light!

133

IV,3,3095

Wouldst thou do such a deed for all the world?

134

IV,3,3098

In troth, I think thou wouldst not.

135

IV,3,3106

Beshrew me, if I would do such a wrong
For the whole world.

136

IV,3,3111

I do not think there is any such woman.

137

IV,3,3132

Good night, good night: heaven me such uses send,
Not to pick bad from bad, but by bad mend!

138

V,2,3325

Who's there? Othello?

139

V,2,3327

Will you come to bed, my lord?

140

V,2,3329

Ay, my lord.

141

V,2,3333

Alas, my lord, what do you mean by that?

142

V,2,3337

Talk you of killing?

143

V,2,3339

Then heaven
Have mercy on me!

144

V,2,3342

If you say so, I hope you will not kill me.

145

V,2,3344

And yet I fear you; for you are fatal then
When your eyes roll so: why I should fear I know not,...

146

V,2,3348

They are loves I bear to you.

147

V,2,3350

That death's unnatural that kills for loving.
Alas, why gnaw you so your nether lip?...

148

V,2,3356

I will so. What's the matter?

149

V,2,3359

No, by my life and soul!
Send for the man, and ask him.

150

V,2,3363

Ay, but not yet to die.

151

V,2,3369

Then Lord have mercy on me!

152

V,2,3371

And have you mercy too! I never did
Offend you in my life; never loved Cassio...

153

V,2,3380

He found it then;
I never gave it him: send for him hither;...

154

V,2,3384

What, my lord?

155

V,2,3386

How? unlawfully?

156

V,2,3388

He will not say so.

157

V,2,3391

O! my fear interprets: what, is he dead?

158

V,2,3394

Alas! he is betray'd and I undone.

159

V,2,3396

O, banish me, my lord, but kill me not!

160

V,2,3398

Kill me to-morrow: let me live to-night!

161

V,2,3400

But half an hour!

162

V,2,3402

But while I say one prayer!

163

V,2,3444

O, falsely, falsely murder'd!

164

V,2,3450

A guiltless death I die.

165

V,2,3452

Nobody; I myself. Farewell
Commend me to my kind lord: O, farewell!

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