Speeches (Lines) for Fluellen
in "Henry V"

Total: 68

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,2,1147

Up to the breach, you dogs! avaunt, you cullions!

2

III,2,1187

To the mines! tell you the duke, it is not so good
to come to the mines; for, look you, the mines is...

3

III,2,1198

It is Captain Macmorris, is it not?

4

III,2,1200

By Cheshu, he is an ass, as in the world: I will
verify as much in his beard: be has no more...

5

III,2,1206

Captain Jamy is a marvellous falourous gentleman,
that is certain; and of great expedition and...

6

III,2,1214

God-den to your worship, good Captain James.

7

III,2,1223

Captain Macmorris, I beseech you now, will you
voutsafe me, look you, a few disputations with you,...

8

III,2,1249

Captain Macmorris, I think, look you, under your
correction, there is not many of your nation—

9

III,2,1254

Look you, if you take the matter otherwise than is
meant, Captain Macmorris, peradventure I shall think...

10

III,2,1267

Captain Macmorris, when there is more better
opportunity to be required, look you, I will be so...

11

III,6,1463

I assure you, there is very excellent services
committed at the bridge.

12

III,6,1466

The Duke of Exeter is as magnanimous as Agamemnon;
and a man that I love and honour with my soul, and my...

13

III,6,1478

He is called Aunchient Pistol.

14

III,6,1481

Here is the man.

15

III,6,1484

Ay, I praise God; and I have merited some love at
his hands.

16

III,6,1491

By your patience, Aunchient Pistol. Fortune is
painted blind, with a muffler afore her eyes, to...

17

III,6,1512

Aunchient Pistol, I do partly understand your meaning.

18

III,6,1514

Certainly, aunchient, it is not a thing to rejoice
at: for if, look you, he were my brother, I would...

19

III,6,1519

It is well.

20

III,6,1522

Very good.

21

III,6,1525

I'll assure you, a' uttered as brave words at the
bridge as you shall see in a summer's day. But it...

22

III,6,1544

I tell you what, Captain Gower; I do perceive he is
not the man that he would gladly make show to the...

23

III,6,1554

Ay, so please your majesty. The Duke of Exeter has
very gallantly maintained the pridge: the French is...

24

III,6,1563

The perdition of th' athversary hath been very
great, reasonable great: marry, for my part, I...

25

IV,1,1913

So! in the name of Jesu Christ, speak lower. It is
the greatest admiration of the universal world, when...

26

IV,1,1924

If the enemy is an ass and a fool and a prating
coxcomb, is it meet, think you, that we should also,...

27

IV,1,1929

I pray you and beseech you that you will.

28

IV,7,2519

Kill the poys and the luggage! 'tis expressly
against the law of arms: 'tis as arrant a piece of...

29

IV,7,2530

Ay, he was porn at Monmouth, Captain Gower. What
call you the town's name where Alexander the Pig was born!

30

IV,7,2533

Why, I pray you, is not pig great? the pig, or the
great, or the mighty, or the huge, or the...

31

IV,7,2539

I think it is in Macedon where Alexander is porn. I
tell you, captain, if you look in the maps of the...

32

IV,7,2559

It is not well done, mark you now take the tales out
of my mouth, ere it is made and finished. I speak...

33

IV,7,2569

That is he: I'll tell you there is good men porn at Monmouth.

34

IV,7,2614

Your grandfather of famous memory, an't please your
majesty, and your great-uncle Edward the Plack...

35

IV,7,2619

Your majesty says very true: if your majesties is
remembered of it, the Welshmen did good service in a...

36

IV,7,2628

All the water in Wye cannot wash your majesty's
Welsh plood out of your pody, I can tell you that:...

37

IV,7,2633

By Jeshu, I am your majesty's countryman, I care not
who know it; I will confess it to all the 'orld: I...

38

IV,7,2654

He is a craven and a villain else, an't please your
majesty, in my conscience.

39

IV,7,2658

Though he be as good a gentleman as the devil is, as
Lucifer and Belzebub himself, it is necessary, look...

40

IV,7,2669

Gower is a good captain, and is good knowledge and
literatured in the wars.

41

IV,7,2680

Your grace doo's me as great honours as can be
desired in the hearts of his subjects: I would fain...

42

IV,7,2687

He is my dear friend, an please you.

43

IV,7,2689

I will fetch him.

44

IV,8,2709

God's will and his pleasure, captain, I beseech you
now, come apace to the king: there is more good...

45

IV,8,2713

Know the glove! I know the glove is glove.

46

IV,8,2716

'Sblood! an arrant traitor as any is in the
universal world, or in France, or in England!

47

IV,8,2720

Stand away, Captain Gower; I will give treason his
payment into ploughs, I warrant you.

48

IV,8,2723

That's a lie in thy throat. I charge you in his
majesty's name, apprehend him: he's a friend of the...

49

IV,8,2728

My Lord of Warwick, here is—praised be God for it!
—a most contagious treason come to light, look...

50

IV,8,2734

My liege, here is a villain and a traitor, that,
look your grace, has struck the glove which your...

51

IV,8,2742

Your majesty hear now, saving your majesty's
manhood, what an arrant, rascally, beggarly, lousy...

52

IV,8,2752

An please your majesty, let his neck answer for it,
if there is any martial law in the world.

53

IV,8,2770

By this day and this light, the fellow has mettle
enough in his belly. Hold, there is twelve pence...

54

IV,8,2776

It is with a good will; I can tell you, it will
serve you to mend your shoes: come, wherefore should...

55

IV,8,2827

Is it not lawful, an please your majesty, to tell
how many is killed?

56

IV,8,2831

Yes, my conscience, he did us great good.

57

V,1,2888

There is occasions and causes why and wherefore in
all things: I will tell you, asse my friend,...

58

V,1,2902

'Tis no matter for his swellings nor his
turkey-cocks. God pless you, Aunchient Pistol! you...

59

V,1,2908

I peseech you heartily, scurvy, lousy knave, at my
desires, and my requests, and my petitions, to eat,...

60

V,1,2915

There is one goat for you.
[Strikes him]...

61

V,1,2919

You say very true, scauld knave, when God's will is:
I will desire you to live in the mean time, and eat...

62

V,1,2927

I say, I will make him eat some part of my leek, or
I will peat his pate four days. Bite, I pray you; it...

63

V,1,2931

Yes, certainly, and out of doubt and out of question
too, and ambiguities.

64

V,1,2935

Eat, I pray you: will you have some more sauce to
your leek? there is not enough leek to swear by.

65

V,1,2938

Much good do you, scauld knave, heartily. Nay, pray
you, throw none away; the skin is good for your...

66

V,1,2943

Ay, leeks is good: hold you, there is a groat to
heal your pate.

67

V,1,2946

Yes, verily and in truth, you shall take it; or I
have another leek in my pocket, which you shall eat.

68

V,1,2949

If I owe you any thing, I will pay you in cudgels:
you shall be a woodmonger, and buy nothing of me but...

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