Speeches (Lines) for Gremio
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 58

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,351

To cart her rather. She's too rough for me.
There, there, Hortensio, will you any wife?

2

I,1,363

And me, too, good Lord!

3

I,1,384

Why will you mew her up,
Signior Baptista, for this fiend of hell,...

4

I,1,402

You may go to the devil's dam; your gifts are so good
here's none will hold you. There! Love is not so great,...

5

I,1,414

What's that, I pray?

6

I,1,416

A husband? a devil.

7

I,1,418

I say a devil. Think'st thou, Hortensio, though her father
be very rich, any man is so very a fool to be married to hell?

8

I,1,424

I cannot tell; but I had as lief take her dowry with this
condition: to be whipp'd at the high cross every morning.

9

I,1,433

I am agreed; and would I had given him the best horse in
Padua to begin his wooing that would thoroughly woo her, wed her,...

10

I,2,692

O, very well; I have perus'd the note.
Hark you, sir; I'll have them very fairly bound-...

11

I,2,707

O this learning, what a thing it is!

12

I,2,712

And you are well met, Signior Hortensio.
Trow you whither I am going? To Baptista Minola....

13

I,2,725

Beloved of me- and that my deeds shall prove.

14

I,2,734

So said, so done, is well.
Hortensio, have you told him all her faults?

15

I,2,738

No, say'st me so, friend? What countryman?

16

I,2,742

O Sir, such a life with such a wife were strange!
But if you have a stomach, to't a God's name;...

17

I,2,762

Hortensio, hark:
This gentleman is happily arriv'd,...

18

I,2,767

And so we will- provided that he win her.

19

I,2,775

Hark you, sir, you mean not her to-

20

I,2,783

No; if without more words you will get you hence.

21

I,2,786

But so is not she.

22

I,2,788

For this reason, if you'll know,
That she's the choice love of Signior Gremio.

23

I,2,801

What, this gentleman will out-talk us all!

24

I,2,810

Yea, leave that labour to great Hercules,
And let it be more than Alcides' twelve.

25

II,1,880

Good morrow, neighbour Baptista.

26

II,1,886

You are too blunt; go to it orderly.

27

II,1,913

Saving your tale, Petruchio, I pray,
Let us that are poor petitioners speak too....

28

II,1,917

I doubt it not, sir; but you will curse your wooing.
Neighbour, this is a gift very grateful, I am sure of it. To...

29

II,1,1151

Hark, Petruchio; she says she'll see thee hang'd first.

30

II,1,1171

[with TRANIO:] Amen, say we; we will be witnesses.

31

II,1,1177

Was ever match clapp'd up so suddenly?

32

II,1,1183

No doubt but he hath got a quiet catch.
But now, Baptista, to your younger daughter:...

33

II,1,1189

Youngling, thou canst not love so dear as I.

34

II,1,1191

But thine doth fry.
Skipper, stand back; 'tis age that nourisheth.

35

II,1,1199

First, as you know, my house within the city
Is richly furnished with plate and gold,...

36

II,1,1225

Two thousand ducats by the year of land!
[Aside] My land amounts not to so much in all.-...

37

II,1,1234

Nay, I have off'red all; I have no more;
And she can have no more than all I have;...

38

II,1,1244

And may not young men die as well as old?

39

II,1,1252

Adieu, good neighbour. Exit BAPTISTA
Now, I fear thee not....

40

III,2,1512

As willingly as e'er I came from school.

41

III,2,1514

A bridegroom, say you? 'Tis a groom indeed,
A grumbling groom, and that the girl shall find.

42

III,2,1517

Why, he's a devil, a devil, a very fiend.

43

III,2,1519

Tut, she's a lamb, a dove, a fool, to him!
I'll tell you, Sir Lucentio: when the priest...

44

III,2,1529

Trembled and shook, for why he stamp'd and swore
As if the vicar meant to cozen him....

45

III,2,1563

Let me entreat you.

46

III,2,1584

Ay, marry, sir, now it begins to work.

47

III,2,1608

Went they not quickly, I should die with laughing.

48

III,2,1612

I warrant him, Petruchio is Kated.

49

V,1,2356

I marvel Cambio comes not all this while.

50

V,1,2364

They're busy within; you were best knock louder.

51

V,1,2432

Stay, Officer; he shall not go to prison.

52

V,1,2434

Take heed, Signior Baptista, lest you be cony-catch'd in
this business; I dare swear this is the right Vincentio.

53

V,1,2437

Nay, I dare not swear it.

54

V,1,2439

Yes, I know thee to be Signior Lucentio.

55

V,1,2456

Here's packing, with a witness, to deceive us all!

56

V,1,2477

My cake is dough, but I'll in among the rest;
Out of hope of all but my share of the feast. Exit

57

V,2,2530

Believe me, sir, they butt together well.

58

V,2,2582

Ay, and a kind one too.
Pray God, sir, your wife send you not a worse.

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