Speeches (Lines) for Henry V
in "Henry IV, Part I"

Total: 170

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,113

Thou art so fat-witted, with drinking of old sack
and unbuttoning thee after supper and sleeping upon...

2

I,2,130

What, none?

3

I,2,133

Well, how then? come, roundly, roundly.

4

I,2,141

Thou sayest well, and it holds well too; for the
fortune of us that are the moon's men doth ebb and...

5

I,2,152

As the honey of Hybla, my old lad of the castle. And
is not a buff jerkin a most sweet robe of durance?

6

I,2,157

Why, what a pox have I to do with my hostess of the tavern?

7

I,2,160

Did I ever call for thee to pay thy part?

8

I,2,162

Yea, and elsewhere, so far as my coin would stretch;
and where it would not, I have used my credit.

9

I,2,170

No; thou shalt.

10

I,2,172

Thou judgest false already: I mean, thou shalt have
the hanging of the thieves and so become a rare hangman.

11

I,2,177

For obtaining of suits?

12

I,2,181

Or an old lion, or a lover's lute.

13

I,2,183

What sayest thou to a hare, or the melancholy of
Moor-ditch?

14

I,2,194

Thou didst well; for wisdom cries out in the
streets, and no man regards it.

15

I,2,205

Where shall we take a purse tomorrow, Jack?

16

I,2,208

I see a good amendment of life in thee; from praying
to purse-taking.

17

I,2,218

Good morrow, Ned.

18

I,2,224

Sir John stands to his word, the devil shall have
his bargain; for he was never yet a breaker of...

19

I,2,228

Else he had been damned for cozening the devil.

20

I,2,243

Who, I rob? I a thief? not I, by my faith.

21

I,2,247

Well then, once in my days I'll be a madcap.

22

I,2,249

Well, come what will, I'll tarry at home.

23

I,2,251

I care not.

24

I,2,261

Farewell, thou latter spring! farewell, All-hallown summer!

25

I,2,270

How shall we part with them in setting forth?

26

I,2,276

Yea, but 'tis like that they will know us by our
horses, by our habits and by every other...

27

I,2,283

Yea, but I doubt they will be too hard for us.

28

I,2,293

Well, I'll go with thee: provide us all things
necessary and meet me to-morrow night in Eastcheap;...

29

I,2,298

I know you all, and will awhile uphold
The unyoked humour of your idleness:...

30

II,2,743

Stand close.

31

II,2,746

Peace, ye fat-kidneyed rascal! what a brawling dost
thou keep!

32

II,2,749

He is walked up to the top of the hill: I'll go seek him.

33

II,2,772

Peace, ye fat-guts! lie down; lay thine ear close
to the ground and list if thou canst hear the tread...

34

II,2,779

Thou liest; thou art not colted, thou art uncolted.

35

II,2,782

Out, ye rogue! shall I be your ostler?

36

II,2,799

Sirs, you four shall front them in the narrow lane;
Ned Poins and I will walk lower: if they 'scape...

37

II,2,805

What, a coward, Sir John Paunch?

38

II,2,808

Well, we leave that to the proof.

39

II,2,813

Ned, where are our disguises?

40

II,2,833

The thieves have bound the true men. Now could thou
and I rob the thieves and go merrily to London, it...

41

II,2,843

Your money!

42

II,2,848

Got with much ease. Now merrily to horse:
The thieves are all scatter'd and possess'd with fear...

43

II,4,985

Ned, prithee, come out of that fat room, and lend me
thy hand to laugh a little.

44

II,4,988

With three or four loggerheads amongst three or four
score hogsheads. I have sounded the very...

45

II,4,1020

Thou art perfect.

46

II,4,1025

Come hither, Francis.

47

II,4,1027

How long hast thou to serve, Francis?

48

II,4,1031

Five year! by'r lady, a long lease for the clinking
of pewter. But, Francis, darest thou be so valiant...

49

II,4,1039

How old art thou, Francis?

50

II,4,1043

Nay, but hark you, Francis: for the sugar thou
gavest me,'twas a pennyworth, wast't not?

51

II,4,1046

I will give thee for it a thousand pound: ask me
when thou wilt, and thou shalt have it.

52

II,4,1050

Anon, Francis? No, Francis; but to-morrow, Francis;
or, Francis, o' Thursday; or indeed, Francis, when...

53

II,4,1054

Wilt thou rob this leathern jerkin, crystal-button,
not-pated, agate-ring, puke-stocking, caddis-garter,...

54

II,4,1058

Why, then, your brown bastard is your only drink;
for look you, Francis, your white canvas doublet...

55

II,4,1063

Away, you rogue! dost thou not hear them call?
[Here they both call him; the drawer stands amazed,...

56

II,4,1072

Let them alone awhile, and then open the door.
[Exit Vintner]...

57

II,4,1077

Sirrah, Falstaff and the rest of the thieves are at
the door: shall we be merry?

58

II,4,1082

I am now of all humours that have showed themselves
humours since the old days of goodman Adam to the...

59

II,4,1089

That ever this fellow should have fewer words than a
parrot, and yet the son of a woman! His industry is...

60

II,4,1111

Didst thou never see Titan kiss a dish of butter?
pitiful-hearted Titan, that melted at the sweet tale...

61

II,4,1125

How now, wool-sack! what mutter you?

62

II,4,1130

Why, you whoreson round man, what's the matter?

63

II,4,1142

O villain! thy lips are scarce wiped since thou
drunkest last.

64

II,4,1147

What's the matter?

65

II,4,1150

Where is it, Jack? where is it?

66

II,4,1153

What, a hundred, man?

67

II,4,1163

Speak, sirs; how was it?

68

II,4,1172

What, fought you with them all?

69

II,4,1177

Pray God you have not murdered some of them.

70

II,4,1184

What, four? thou saidst but two even now.

71

II,4,1190

Seven? why, there were but four even now.

72

II,4,1194

Prithee, let him alone; we shall have more anon.

73

II,4,1196

Ay, and mark thee too, Jack.

74

II,4,1199

So, two more already.

75

II,4,1205

O monstrous! eleven buckram men grown out of two!

76

II,4,1210

These lies are like their father that begets them;
gross as a mountain, open, palpable. Why, thou...

77

II,4,1216

Why, how couldst thou know these men in Kendal
green, when it was so dark thou couldst not see thy...

78

II,4,1226

I'll be no longer guilty of this sin; this sanguine
coward, this bed-presser, this horseback-breaker,...

79

II,4,1234

Well, breathe awhile, and then to it again: and
when thou hast tired thyself in base comparisons,...

80

II,4,1238

We two saw you four set on four and bound them, and
were masters of their wealth. Mark now, how a plain...

81

II,4,1266

Content; and the argument shall be thy running away.

82

II,4,1270

How now, my lady the hostess! what sayest thou to
me?

83

II,4,1275

Give him as much as will make him a royal man, and
send him back again to my mother.

84

II,4,1281

Prithee, do, Jack.

85

II,4,1284

Now, sirs: by'r lady, you fought fair; so did you,
Peto; so did you, Bardolph: you are lions too, you...

86

II,4,1289

'Faith, tell me now in earnest, how came Falstaff's
sword so hacked?

87

II,4,1299

O villain, thou stolest a cup of sack eighteen years
ago, and wert taken with the manner, and ever since...

88

II,4,1306

I do.

89

II,4,1308

Hot livers and cold purses.

90

II,4,1310

No, if rightly taken, halter.
[Re-enter FALSTAFF]...

91

II,4,1331

He that rides at high speed and with his pistol
kills a sparrow flying.

92

II,4,1334

So did he never the sparrow.

93

II,4,1336

Why, what a rascal art thou then, to praise him so
for running!

94

II,4,1339

Yes, Jack, upon instinct.

95

II,4,1345

Why, then, it is like, if there come a hot June and
this civil buffeting hold, we shall buy maidenheads...

96

II,4,1356

Not a whit, i' faith; I lack some of thy instinct.

97

II,4,1359

Do thou stand for my father, and examine me upon the
particulars of my life.

98

II,4,1363

Thy state is taken for a joined-stool, thy golden
sceptre for a leaden dagger, and thy precious rich...

99

II,4,1371

Well, here is my leg.

100

II,4,1403

What manner of man, an it like your majesty?

101

II,4,1416

Dost thou speak like a king? Do thou stand for me,
and I'll play my father.

102

II,4,1421

Well, here I am set.

103

II,4,1423

Now, Harry, whence come you?

104

II,4,1425

The complaints I hear of thee are grievous.

105

II,4,1428

Swearest thou, ungracious boy? henceforth ne'er look
on me. Thou art violently carried away from grace:...

106

II,4,1445

That villanous abominable misleader of youth,
Falstaff, that old white-bearded Satan.

107

II,4,1448

I know thou dost.

108

II,4,1464

I do, I will.

109

II,4,1474

Heigh, heigh! the devil rides upon a fiddlestick:
what's the matter?

110

II,4,1481

And thou a natural coward, without instinct.

111

II,4,1486

Go, hide thee behind the arras: the rest walk up
above. Now, my masters, for a true face and good...

112

II,4,1491

Call in the sheriff.
[Exeunt all except PRINCE HENRY and PETO]...

113

II,4,1497

What men?

114

II,4,1501

The man, I do assure you, is not here;
For I myself at this time have employ'd him....

115

II,4,1510

It may be so: if he have robb'd these men,
He shall be answerable; and so farewell.

116

II,4,1513

I think it is good morrow, is it not?

117

II,4,1516

This oily rascal is known as well as Paul's. Go,
call him forth.

118

II,4,1520

Hark, how hard he fetches breath. Search his pockets.
[He searcheth his pockets, and findeth certain papers]...

119

II,4,1524

Let's see what they be: read them.

120

II,4,1530

O monstrous! but one half-penny-worth of bread to
this intolerable deal of sack! What there is else,...

121

III,2,1841

So please your majesty, I would I could
Quit all offences with as clear excuse...

122

III,2,1915

I shall hereafter, my thrice gracious lord,
Be more myself.

123

III,2,1953

Do not think so; you shall not find it so:
And God forgive them that so much have sway'd...

124

III,3,2103

What sayest thou, Mistress Quickly? How doth thy
husband? I love him well; he is an honest man.

125

III,3,2107

What sayest thou, Jack?

126

III,3,2111

What didst thou lose, Jack?

127

III,3,2115

A trifle, some eight-penny matter.

128

III,3,2120

What! he did not?

129

III,3,2137

An otter, Sir John! Why an otter?

130

III,3,2142

Thou sayest true, hostess; and he slanders thee most grossly.

131

III,3,2145

Sirrah, do I owe you a thousand pound?

132

III,3,2153

I say 'tis copper: darest thou be as good as thy word now?

133

III,3,2157

And why not as the lion?

134

III,3,2161

O, if it should, how would thy guts fall about thy
knees! But, sirrah, there's no room for faith,...

135

III,3,2178

It appears so by the story.

136

III,3,2187

O, my sweet beef, I must still be good angel to
thee: the money is paid back again.

137

III,3,2190

I am good friends with my father and may do any thing.

138

III,3,2194

I have procured thee, Jack, a charge of foot.

139

III,3,2201

Bardolph!

140

III,3,2203

Go bear this letter to Lord John of Lancaster, to my
brother John; this to my Lord of Westmoreland....

141

IV,2,2418

How now, blown Jack! how now, quilt!

142

IV,2,2429

I think, to steal cream indeed, for thy theft hath
already made thee butter. But tell me, Jack, whose...

143

IV,2,2433

I did never see such pitiful rascals.

144

IV,2,2442

No I'll be sworn; unless you call three fingers on
the ribs bare. But, sirrah, make haste: Percy is...

145

V,1,2624

The southern wind
Doth play the trumpet to his purposes,...

146

V,1,2652

Peace, chewet, peace!

147

V,1,2706

In both your armies there is many a soul
Shall pay full dearly for this encounter,...

148

V,1,2739

It will not be accepted, on my life:
The Douglas and the Hotspur both together...

149

V,1,2748

Nothing but a colossus can do thee that friendship.
Say thy prayers, and farewell.

150

V,1,2751

Why, thou owest God a death.

151

V,3,2925

What, stand'st thou idle here? lend me thy sword:
Many a nobleman lies stark and stiff...

152

V,3,2933

He is, indeed; and living to kill thee. I prithee,
lend me thy sword.

153

V,3,2937

Give it to me: what, is it in the case?

154

V,3,2940

What, is it a time to jest and dally now?

155

V,4,2954

I beseech your majesty, make up,
Lest your retirement do amaze your friends.

156

V,4,2959

Lead me, my lord? I do not need your help:
And God forbid a shallow scratch should drive...

157

V,4,2967

By God, thou hast deceived me, Lancaster;
I did not think thee lord of such a spirit:...

158

V,4,2974

O, this boy
Lends mettle to us all!

159

V,4,2993

Hold up thy head, vile Scot, or thou art like
Never to hold it up again! the spirits...

160

V,4,3006

O God! they did me too much injury
That ever said I hearken'd for your death....

161

V,4,3017

Thou speak'st as if I would deny my name.

162

V,4,3019

Why, then I see
A very valiant rebel of the name....

163

V,4,3029

I'll make it greater ere I part from thee;
And all the budding honours on thy crest...

164

V,4,3051

For worms, brave Percy: fare thee well, great heart!
Ill-weaved ambition, how much art thou shrunk!...

165

V,4,3100

Come, brother John; full bravely hast thou flesh'd
Thy maiden sword.

166

V,4,3104

I did; I saw him dead,
Breathless and bleeding on the ground. Art...

167

V,4,3116

Why, Percy I killed myself and saw thee dead.

168

V,4,3127

This is the strangest fellow, brother John.
Come, bring your luggage nobly on your back:...

169

V,5,3159

The noble Scot, Lord Douglas, when he saw
The fortune of the day quite turn'd from him,...

170

V,5,3168

Then, brother John of Lancaster, to you
This honourable bounty shall belong:...

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