Speeches (Lines) for Henry V
in "Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 60

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,945

Before God, I am exceeding weary.

2

II,2,949

Faith, it does me; though it discolours the complexion
my greatness to acknowledge it. Doth it not show vilely in me...

3

II,2,956

Belike then my appetite was not-princely got; for, by
troth, I do now remember the poor creature, small beer. But...

4

II,2,986

Shall I tell thee one thing, Poins?

5

II,2,988

It shall serve among wits of no higher breeding than

6

II,2,992

Marry, I tell thee it is not meet that I should be sad,
my father is sick; albeit I could tell to thee—as to one it...

7

II,2,999

By this hand, thou thinkest me as far in the devil's
as thou and Falstaff for obduracy and persistency: let the...

8

II,2,1008

What wouldst thou think of me if I should weep?

9

II,2,1010

It would be every man's thought; and thou art a blessed
fellow to think as every man thinks. Never a man's thought in...

10

II,2,1020

And to thee.

11

II,2,1030

And the boy that I gave Falstaff. 'A had him from me
Christian; and look if the fat villain have not transform'd...

12

II,2,1035

And yours, most noble Bardolph!

13

II,2,1046

Has not the boy profited?

14

II,2,1049

Instruct us, boy; what dream, boy?

15

II,2,1052

A crown's worth of good interpretation. There 'tis,

16

II,2,1060

And how doth thy master, Bardolph?

17

II,2,1070

I do allow this well to be as familiar with me as my
and he holds his place, for look you how he writes.

18

II,2,1084

Nay, they will be kin to us, or they will fetch it from
Japhet. But the letter: [Reads] 'Sir John Falstaff, knight,...

19

II,2,1091

Peace! [Reads] 'I will imitate the honourable Romans
brevity.'-

20

II,2,1095

[Reads] 'I commend me to thee, I commend thee, and I
leave thee. Be not too familiar with Poins; for he misuses...

21

II,2,1107

That's to make him eat twenty of his words. But do you
me thus, Ned? Must I marry your sister?

22

II,2,1112

Well, thus we play the fools with the time, and the
of the wise sit in the clouds and mock us. Is your master...

23

II,2,1118

Where sups he? Doth the old boar feed in the old frank?

24

II,2,1120

What company?

25

II,2,1122

Sup any women with him?

26

II,2,1125

What pagan may that be?

27

II,2,1128

Even such kin as the parish heifers are to the town
Shall we steal upon them, Ned, at supper?

28

II,2,1132

Sirrah, you boy, and Bardolph, no word to your master
I am yet come to town. There's for your silence.

29

II,2,1137

Fare you well; go. Exeunt BARDOLPH and PAGE
This Doll Tearsheet should be some road.

30

II,2,1142

How might we see Falstaff bestow himself to-night in
true colours, and not ourselves be seen?

31

II,2,1148

From a god to a bull? A heavy descension! It was Jove's
case. From a prince to a prentice? A low transformation! That...

32

II,4,1545

Would not this nave of a wheel have his ears cut off?

33

II,4,1547

Look whe'er the wither'd elder hath not his poll claw'd
like a parrot.

34

II,4,1553

Saturn and Venus this year in conjunction! What says
almanac to that?

35

II,4,1574

[with POINS:] Anon, anon, sir. [Advancing]

36

II,4,1578

Why, thou globe of sinful continents, what a life dost
lead!

37

II,4,1583

Very true, sir, and I come to draw you out by the ears.

38

II,4,1594

YOU whoreson candle-mine, you, how vilely did you speak
me even now before this honest, virtuous, civil gentlewoman!

39

II,4,1601

Yea; and you knew me, as you did when you ran away by
Gadshill. You knew I was at your back, and spoke it on...

40

II,4,1607

I shall drive you then to confess the wilful abuse, and
then I know how to handle you.

41

II,4,1610

Not to dispraise me, and call me pander, and
bread-chipper, and I know not what!

42

II,4,1623

See now, whether pure fear and entire cowardice doth
make thee wrong this virtuous gentlewoman to close with us?...

43

II,4,1640

For the women?

44

II,4,1657

You, gentlewoman—

45

II,4,1664

Peto, how now! What news?

46

II,4,1671

By heaven, Poins, I feel me much to blame
So idly to profane the precious time,...

47

IV,5,2895

Who saw the Duke of Clarence?

48

IV,5,2897

How now! Rain within doors, and none abroad!
How doth the King?

49

IV,5,2900

Heard he the good news yet? Tell it him.

50

IV,5,2902

If he be sick with joy, he'll recover without physic.

51

IV,5,2907

No; I will sit and watch here by the King.
[Exeunt all but the PRINCE]...

52

IV,5,2987

I never thought to hear you speak again.

53

IV,5,3034

O, pardon me, my liege! But for my tears,
The moist impediments unto my speech,...

54

IV,5,3116

My gracious liege,
You won it, wore it, kept it, gave it me;...

55

IV,5,3129

My Lord of Warwick!

56

V,2,3311

You all look strangely on me; and you most.
You are, I think, assur'd I love you not.

57

V,2,3315

No?
How might a prince of my great hopes forget...

58

V,2,3350

You are right, Justice, and you weigh this well;
Therefore still bear the balance and the sword;...

59

V,5,3636

My Lord Chief Justice, speak to that vain man.

60

V,5,3640

I know thee not, old man. Fall to thy prayers.
How ill white hairs become a fool and jester!...

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