Speeches (Lines) for Jaques (lord)
in "As You Like It"

Total: 57

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,5,828

More, more, I prithee, more.

2

II,5,830

I thank it. More, I prithee, more. I can suck melancholy
out of a song, as a weasel sucks eggs. More, I prithee, more.

3

II,5,833

I do not desire you to please me; I do desire you to sing.
Come, more; another stanzo. Call you 'em stanzos?

4

II,5,836

Nay, I care not for their names; they owe me nothing. Will
you sing?

5

II,5,839

Well then, if ever I thank any man, I'll thank you; but
that they call compliment is like th' encounter of two dog-apes;...

6

II,5,847

And I have been all this day to avoid him. He is too
disputable for my company. I think of as many matters as he; but...

7

II,5,860

I'll give you a verse to this note that I made yesterday in
despite of my invention.

8

II,5,863

Thus it goes:
If it do come to pass...

9

II,5,873

'Tis a Greek invocation, to call fools into a circle. I'll
go sleep, if I can; if I cannot, I'll rail against all the...

10

II,7,906

A fool, a fool! I met a fool i' th' forest,
A motley fool. A miserable world!...

11

II,7,930

O worthy fool! One that hath been a courtier,
And says, if ladies be but young and fair,...

12

II,7,939

It is my only suit,
Provided that you weed your better judgments...

13

II,7,958

What, for a counter, would I do but good?

14

II,7,965

Why, who cries out on pride
That can therein tax any private party?...

15

II,7,985

Why, I have eat none yet.

16

II,7,987

Of what kind should this cock come of?

17

II,7,997

An you will not be answer'd with reason, I must die.

18

II,7,1037

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;...

19

III,2,1353

I thank you for your company; but, good faith, I had as
lief have been myself alone.

20

III,2,1357

God buy you; let's meet as little as we can.

21

III,2,1359

I pray you mar no more trees with writing love songs in
their barks.

22

III,2,1363

Rosalind is your love's name?

23

III,2,1365

I do not like her name.

24

III,2,1368

What stature is she of?

25

III,2,1370

You are full of pretty answers. Have you not been
acquainted with goldsmiths' wives, and conn'd them out of rings?

26

III,2,1374

You have a nimble wit; I think 'twas made of Atalanta's
heels. Will you sit down with me? and we two will rail against...

27

III,2,1379

The worst fault you have is to be in love.

28

III,2,1382

By my troth, I was seeking for a fool when I found you.

29

III,2,1385

There I shall see mine own figure.

30

III,2,1387

I'll tarry no longer with you; farewell, good Signior Love.

31

III,3,1512

[Aside] O knowledge ill-inhabited, worse than Jove in a
thatch'd house!

32

III,3,1530

[Aside] A material fool!

33

III,3,1541

[Aside] I would fain see this meeting.

34

III,3,1562

[Discovering himself] Proceed, proceed; I'll give her.

35

III,3,1567

Will you be married, motley?

36

III,3,1571

And will you, being a man of your breeding, be married
under a bush, like a beggar? Get you to church and have a good...

37

III,3,1580

Go thou with me, and let me counsel thee.

38

IV,1,1797

I prithee, pretty youth, let me be better acquainted with
thee.

39

IV,1,1800

I am so; I do love it better than laughing.

40

IV,1,1804

Why, 'tis good to be sad and say nothing.

41

IV,1,1806

I have neither the scholar's melancholy, which is
emulation; nor the musician's, which is fantastical; nor the...

42

IV,1,1819

Yes, I have gain'd my experience.

43

IV,1,1825

Nay, then, God buy you, an you talk in blank verse.

44

IV,2,1981

Which is he that killed the deer?

45

IV,2,1983

Let's present him to the Duke, like a Roman conqueror; and
it would do well to set the deer's horns upon his head for a...

46

IV,2,1987

Sing it; 'tis no matter how it be in tune, so it make noise
enough....

47

V,4,2439

There is, sure, another flood toward, and these couples are
coming to the ark. Here comes a pair of very strange beasts which...

48

V,4,2443

Good my lord, bid him welcome. This is the motley-minded
gentleman that I have so often met in the forest. He hath been a...

49

V,4,2451

And how was that ta'en up?

50

V,4,2454

How seventh cause? Good my lord, like this fellow.

51

V,4,2466

But, for the seventh cause: how did you find the quarrel on
the seventh cause?

52

V,4,2480

And how oft did you say his beard was not well cut?

53

V,4,2484

Can you nominate in order now the degrees of the lie?

54

V,4,2496

Is not this a rare fellow, my lord?
He's as good at any thing, and yet a fool.

55

V,4,2576

Sir, by your patience. If I heard you rightly,
The Duke hath put on a religious life,...

56

V,4,2580

To him will I. Out of these convertites
There is much matter to be heard and learn'd....

57

V,4,2591

To see no pastime I. What you would have
I'll stay to know at your abandon'd cave. Exit

Return to the "As You Like It" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS