Speeches (Lines) for King of France
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 87

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,235

The Florentines and Senoys are by the ears;
Have fought with equal fortune and continue...

2

I,2,239

Nay, 'tis most credible; we here received it
A certainty, vouch'd from our cousin Austria,...

3

I,2,248

He hath arm'd our answer,
And Florence is denied before he comes:...

4

I,2,256

What's he comes here?

5

I,2,260

Youth, thou bear'st thy father's face;
Frank nature, rather curious than in haste,...

6

I,2,265

I would I had that corporal soundness now,
As when thy father and myself in friendship...

7

I,2,294

Would I were with him! He would always say—
Methinks I hear him now; his plausive words...

8

I,2,312

I fill a place, I know't. How long is't, count,
Since the physician at your father's died?...

9

I,2,316

If he were living, I would try him yet.
Lend me an arm; the rest have worn me out...

10

II,1,593

Farewell, young lords; these warlike principles
Do not throw from you: and you, my lords, farewell:...

11

II,1,601

No, no, it cannot be; and yet my heart
Will not confess he owes the malady...

12

II,1,612

Those girls of Italy, take heed of them:
They say, our French lack language to deny,...

13

II,1,617

Farewell. Come hither to me.

14

II,1,661

I'll fee thee to stand up.

15

II,1,665

I would I had; so I had broke thy pate,
And ask'd thee mercy for't.

16

II,1,669

No.

17

II,1,679

What 'her' is this?

18

II,1,689

Now, good Lafeu,
Bring in the admiration; that we with thee...

19

II,1,696

Thus he his special nothing ever prologues.

20

II,1,699

This haste hath wings indeed.

21

II,1,706

Now, fair one, does your business follow us?

22

II,1,710

I knew him.

23

II,1,723

We thank you, maiden;
But may not be so credulous of cure,...

24

II,1,738

I cannot give thee less, to be call'd grateful:
Thou thought'st to help me; and such thanks I give...

25

II,1,754

I must not hear thee; fare thee well, kind maid;
Thy pains not used must by thyself be paid:...

26

II,1,768

Are thou so confident? within what space
Hopest thou my cure?

27

II,1,779

Upon thy certainty and confidence
What darest thou venture?

28

II,1,786

Methinks in thee some blessed spirit doth speak
His powerful sound within an organ weak:...

29

II,1,802

Make thy demand.

30

II,1,804

Ay, by my sceptre and my hopes of heaven.

31

II,1,813

Here is my hand; the premises observed,
Thy will by my performance shall be served:...

32

II,3,940

Go, call before me all the lords in court.
Sit, my preserver, by thy patient's side;...

33

II,3,957

Peruse them well:
Not one of those but had a noble father.

34

II,3,969

Make choice; and, see,
Who shuns thy love shuns all his love in me.

35

II,3,1004

Why, then, young Bertram, take her; she's thy wife.

36

II,3,1008

Know'st thou not, Bertram,
What she has done for me?

37

II,3,1012

Thou know'st she has raised me from my sickly bed.

38

II,3,1018

'Tis only title thou disdain'st in her, the which
I can build up. Strange is it that our bloods,...

39

II,3,1047

Thou wrong'st thyself, if thou shouldst strive to choose.

40

II,3,1050

My honour's at the stake; which to defeat,
I must produce my power. Here, take her hand,...

41

II,3,1075

Take her by the hand,
And tell her she is thine: to whom I promise...

42

II,3,1080

Good fortune and the favour of the king
Smile upon this contract; whose ceremony...

43

V,3,2673

We lost a jewel of her; and our esteem
Was made much poorer by it: but your son,...

44

V,3,2682

My honour'd lady,
I have forgiven and forgotten all;...

45

V,3,2695

Praising what is lost
Makes the remembrance dear. Well, call him hither;...

46

V,3,2706

What says he to your daughter? have you spoke?

47

V,3,2708

Then shall we have a match. I have letters sent me
That set him high in fame.

48

V,3,2711

I am not a day of season,
For thou mayst see a sunshine and a hail...

49

V,3,2718

All is whole;
Not one word more of the consumed time....

50

V,3,2737

Well excused:
That thou didst love her, strikes some scores away...

51

V,3,2766

Now, pray you, let me see it; for mine eye,
While I was speaking, oft was fasten'd to't....

52

V,3,2791

Plutus himself,
That knows the tinct and multiplying medicine,...

53

V,3,2804

Thou speak'st it falsely, as I love mine honour;
And makest conjectural fears to come into me...

54

V,3,2822

I am wrapp'd in dismal thinkings.

55

V,3,2835

[Reads] Upon his many protestations to marry me
when his wife was dead, I blush to say it, he won...

56

V,3,2846

The heavens have thought well on thee Lafeu,
To bring forth this discovery. Seek these suitors:...

57

V,3,2853

I wonder, sir, sith wives are monsters to you,
And that you fly them as you swear them lordship,...

58

V,3,2865

Come hither, count; do you know these women?

59

V,3,2883

Sir, for my thoughts, you have them ill to friend
Till your deeds gain them: fairer prove your honour...

60

V,3,2889

What say'st thou to her?

61

V,3,2904

Methought you said
You saw one here in court could witness it.

62

V,3,2909

Find him, and bring him hither.

63

V,3,2917

She hath that ring of yours.

64

V,3,2935

What ring was yours, I pray you?

65

V,3,2938

Know you this ring? this ring was his of late.

66

V,3,2940

The story then goes false, you threw it him
Out of a casement.

67

V,3,2945

You boggle shrewdly, every feather stars you.
Is this the man you speak of?

68

V,3,2948

Tell me, sirrah, but tell me true, I charge you,
Not fearing the displeasure of your master,...

69

V,3,2955

Come, come, to the purpose: did he love this woman?

70

V,3,2957

How, I pray you?

71

V,3,2959

How is that?

72

V,3,2961

As thou art a knave, and no knave. What an
equivocal companion is this!

73

V,3,2967

But wilt thou not speak all thou knowest?

74

V,3,2977

Thou hast spoken all already, unless thou canst say
they are married: but thou art too fine in thy...

75

V,3,2982

Where did you buy it? or who gave it you?

76

V,3,2984

Who lent it you?

77

V,3,2986

Where did you find it, then?

78

V,3,2988

If it were yours by none of all these ways,
How could you give it him?

79

V,3,2993

This ring was mine; I gave it his first wife.

80

V,3,2995

Take her away; I do not like her now;
To prison with her: and away with him....

81

V,3,3000

Take her away.

82

V,3,3002

I think thee now some common customer.

83

V,3,3004

Wherefore hast thou accused him all this while?

84

V,3,3010

She does abuse our ears: to prison with her.

85

V,3,3023

Is there no exorcist
Beguiles the truer office of mine eyes?...

86

V,3,3046

Let us from point to point this story know,
To make the even truth in pleasure flow....

87

V,3,3059

The king's a beggar, now the play is done:
All is well ended, if this suit be won,...

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