Speeches (Lines) for Lady Capulet
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 45

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,94

A crutch, a crutch! why call you for a sword?

2

I,3,381

Nurse, where's my daughter? call her forth to me.

3

I,3,390

This is the matter:—Nurse, give leave awhile,
We must talk in secret:—nurse, come back again;...

4

I,3,395

She's not fourteen.

5

I,3,400

A fortnight and odd days.

6

I,3,434

Enough of this; I pray thee, hold thy peace.

7

I,3,448

Marry, that 'marry' is the very theme
I came to talk of. Tell me, daughter Juliet,...

8

I,3,454

Well, think of marriage now; younger than you,
Here in Verona, ladies of esteem,...

9

I,3,462

Verona's summer hath not such a flower.

10

I,3,464

What say you? can you love the gentleman?
This night you shall behold him at our feast;...

11

I,3,481

Speak briefly, can you like of Paris' love?

12

I,3,490

We follow thee.
[Exit Servant]...

13

III,1,1663

Tybalt, my cousin! O my brother's child!
O prince! O cousin! husband! O, the blood is spilt...

14

III,1,1694

He is a kinsman to the Montague;
Affection makes him false; he speaks not true:...

15

III,4,2068

I will, and know her mind early to-morrow;
To-night she is mew'd up to her heaviness.

16

III,5,2166

[Within] Ho, daughter! are you up?

17

III,5,2171

Why, how now, Juliet!

18

III,5,2173

Evermore weeping for your cousin's death?
What, wilt thou wash him from his grave with tears?...

19

III,5,2179

So shall you feel the loss, but not the friend
Which you weep for.

20

III,5,2183

Well, girl, thou weep'st not so much for his death,
As that the villain lives which slaughter'd him.

21

III,5,2186

That same villain, Romeo.

22

III,5,2190

That is, because the traitor murderer lives.

23

III,5,2193

We will have vengeance for it, fear thou not:
Then weep no more. I'll send to one in Mantua,...

24

III,5,2209

Find thou the means, and I'll find such a man.
But now I'll tell thee joyful tidings, girl.

25

III,5,2213

Well, well, thou hast a careful father, child;
One who, to put thee from thy heaviness,...

26

III,5,2218

Marry, my child, early next Thursday morn,
The gallant, young and noble gentleman,...

27

III,5,2230

Here comes your father; tell him so yourself,
And see how he will take it at your hands.

28

III,5,2246

Ay, sir; but she will none, she gives you thanks.
I would the fool were married to her grave!

29

III,5,2265

Fie, fie! what, are you mad?

30

III,5,2287

You are too hot.

31

III,5,2317

Talk not to me, for I'll not speak a word:
Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee.

32

IV,2,2533

No, not till Thursday; there is time enough.

33

IV,2,2536

We shall be short in our provision:
'Tis now near night.

34

IV,3,2555

What, are you busy, ho? need you my help?

35

IV,3,2562

Good night:
Get thee to bed, and rest; for thou hast need.

36

IV,4,2613

Hold, take these keys, and fetch more spices, nurse.

37

IV,4,2625

Ay, you have been a mouse-hunt in your time;
But I will watch you from such watching now.

38

IV,5,2671

What noise is here?

39

IV,5,2673

What is the matter?

40

IV,5,2675

O me, O me! My child, my only life,
Revive, look up, or I will die with thee!...

41

IV,5,2681

Alack the day, she's dead, she's dead, she's dead!

42

IV,5,2688

O woful time!

43

IV,5,2702

Accursed, unhappy, wretched, hateful day!
Most miserable hour that e'er time saw...

44

V,3,3164

The people in the street cry Romeo,
Some Juliet, and some Paris; and all run,...

45

V,3,3179

O me! this sight of death is as a bell,
That warns my old age to a sepulchre.

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