Speeches (Lines) for Page
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 75

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,66

[Within] Who's there?

2

I,1,72

I am glad to see your worships well.
I thank you for my venison, Master Shallow.

3

I,1,78

Sir, I thank you.

4

I,1,80

I am glad to see you, good Master Slender.

5

I,1,83

It could not be judged, sir.

6

I,1,87

A cur, sir.

7

I,1,91

Sir, he is within; and I would I could do a good
office between you.

8

I,1,95

Sir, he doth in some sort confess it.

9

I,1,100

Here comes Sir John.

10

I,1,129

We three, to hear it and end it between them.

11

I,1,171

Nay, daughter, carry the wine in; we'll drink within.

12

I,1,174

How now, Mistress Ford!

13

I,1,178

Wife, bid these gentlemen welcome. Come, we have a
hot venison pasty to dinner: come, gentlemen, I hope...

14

I,1,280

Come, gentle Master Slender, come; we stay for you.

15

I,1,282

By cock and pie, you shall not choose, sir! come, come.

16

I,1,284

Come on, sir.

17

II,1,699

'The humour of it,' quoth a'! here's a fellow
frights English out of his wits.

18

II,1,702

I never heard such a drawling, affecting rogue.

19

II,1,704

I will not believe such a Cataian, though the priest
o' the town commended him for a true man.

20

II,1,707

How now, Meg!

21

II,1,726

How now, Master Ford!

22

II,1,728

Yes: and you heard what the other told me?

23

II,1,730

Hang 'em, slaves! I do not think the knight would
offer it: but these that accuse him in his intent...

24

II,1,735

Marry, were they.

25

II,1,738

Ay, marry, does he. If he should intend this voyage
towards my wife, I would turn her loose to him; and...

26

II,1,745

Look where my ranting host of the Garter comes:
there is either liquor in his pate or money in his...

27

II,1,777

I have heard the Frenchman hath good skill in
his rapier.

28

II,1,785

Have with you. I would rather hear them scold than fight.

29

II,3,1119

Now, good master doctor!

30

II,3,1138

Master Shallow, you have yourself been a great
fighter, though now a man of peace.

31

II,3,1145

'Tis true, Master Shallow.

32

II,3,1168

Sir Hugh is there, is he?

33

II,3,1172

[with Shallow and Slender] Adieu, good master doctor.

34

III,1,1233

'Save you, good Sir Hugh!

35

III,1,1237

And youthful still! in your doublet and hose this
raw rheumatic day!

36

III,1,1240

We are come to you to do a good office, master parson.

37

III,1,1242

Yonder is a most reverend gentleman, who, belike
having received wrong by some person, is at most...

38

III,1,1250

I think you know him; Master Doctor Caius, the
renowned French physician.

39

III,1,1254

Why?

40

III,1,1258

I warrant you, he's the man should fight with him.

41

III,1,1263

Nay, good master parson, keep in your weapon.

42

III,2,1371

You have, Master Slender; I stand wholly for you:
but my wife, master doctor, is for you altogether.

43

III,2,1380

Not by my consent, I promise you. The gentleman is
of no having: he kept company with the wild prince...

44

III,3,1558

Good Master Ford, be contented: you wrong yourself too much.

45

III,3,1565

Nay, follow him, gentlemen; see the issue of his search.

46

III,3,1602

Fie, fie, Master Ford! are you not ashamed? What
spirit, what devil suggests this imagination? I...

47

III,3,1616

Let's go in, gentlemen; but, trust me, we'll mock
him. I do invite you to-morrow morning to my house...

48

III,4,1697

Now, Master Slender: love him, daughter Anne.
Why, how now! what does Master Fenton here?...

49

III,4,1703

She is no match for you.

50

III,4,1705

No, good Master Fenton.
Come, Master Shallow; come, son Slender, in....

51

IV,2,2082

Why, this passes, Master Ford; you are not to go
loose any longer; you must be pinioned.

52

IV,2,2096

This passes!

53

IV,2,2109

Here's no man.

54

IV,2,2115

No, nor nowhere else but in your brain.

55

IV,2,2154

Let's obey his humour a little further: come,
gentlemen.

56

IV,4,2198

And did he send you both these letters at an instant?

57

IV,4,2205

'Tis well, 'tis well; no more:
Be not as extreme in submission...

58

IV,4,2213

How? to send him word they'll meet him in the park
at midnight? Fie, fie! he'll never come.

59

IV,4,2220

So think I too.

60

IV,4,2234

Why, yet there want not many that do fear
In deep of night to walk by this Herne's oak:...

61

IV,4,2239

Well, let it not be doubted but he'll come:
And in this shape when you have brought him thither,...

62

IV,4,2271

That silk will I go buy.
[Aside]...

63

V,2,2512

Come, come; we'll couch i' the castle-ditch till we
see the light of our fairies. Remember, son Slender,...

64

V,2,2522

The night is dark; light and spirits will become it
well. Heaven prosper our sport! No man means evil...

65

V,5,2678

Nay, do not fly; I think we have watch'd you now
Will none but Herne the hunter serve your turn?

66

V,5,2726

Old, cold, withered and of intolerable entrails?

67

V,5,2728

And as poor as Job?

68

V,5,2742

Yet be cheerful, knight: thou shalt eat a posset
to-night at my house; where I will desire thee to...

69

V,5,2750

Son, how now! how now, son! have you dispatched?

70

V,5,2753

Of what, son?

71

V,5,2760

Upon my life, then, you took the wrong.

72

V,5,2765

Why, this is your own folly. Did not I tell you how
you should know my daughter by her garments?

73

V,5,2781

My heart misgives me: here comes Master Fenton.
[Enter FENTON and ANNE PAGE]...

74

V,5,2785

Now, mistress, how chance you went not with Master Slender?

75

V,5,2803

Well, what remedy? Fenton, heaven give thee joy!
What cannot be eschew'd must be embraced.

Return to the "Merry Wives of Windsor" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS