Speeches (Lines) for Edward Poins
in "Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 28

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,946

Is't come to that? I had thought weariness durst not
attach'd one of so high blood.

2

II,2,954

Why, a prince should not be so loosely studied as to
remember so weak a composition.

3

II,2,982

How ill it follows, after you have laboured so hard, you
should talk so idly! Tell me, how many good young princes...

4

II,2,987

Yes, faith; and let it be an excellent good thing.

5

II,2,990

Go to; I stand the push of your one thing that you will
tell.

6

II,2,998

Very hardly upon such a subject.

7

II,2,1007

The reason?

8

II,2,1009

I would think thee a most princely hypocrite.

9

II,2,1017

Why, because you have been so lewd and so much engraffed
Falstaff.

10

II,2,1021

By this light, I am well spoke on; I can hear it with
own ears. The worst that they can say of me is that I am a...

11

II,2,1036

Come, you virtuous ass, you bashful fool, must you be
blushing? Wherefore blush you now? What a maidenly...

12

II,2,1055

O that this blossom could be kept from cankers!
Well, there is sixpence to preserve thee.

13

II,2,1064

Deliver'd with good respect. And how doth the martlemas,
your master?

14

II,2,1067

Marry, the immortal part needs a physician; but that
not him. Though that be sick, it dies not.

15

II,2,1073

[Reads] 'John Falstaff, knight'—Every man must know
as oft as he has occasion to name himself, even like those...

16

II,2,1090

Why, this is a certificate.

17

II,2,1094

He sure means brevity in breath, short-winded.

18

II,2,1105

My lord, I'll steep this letter in sack and make him eat

19

II,2,1110

God send the wench no worse fortune! But I never said

20

II,2,1131

I am your shadow, my lord; I'll follow you.

21

II,2,1139

I warrant you, as common as the way between Saint Albans
London.

22

II,2,1145

Put on two leathern jerkins and aprons, and wait upon
his table as drawers.

23

II,4,1546

Let's beat him before his whore.

24

II,4,1549

Is it not strange that desire should so many years
performance?

25

II,4,1556

And look whether the fiery Trigon, his man, be not
to his master's old tables, his note-book, his

26

II,4,1591

My lord, he will drive you out of your revenge and turn
to a merriment, if you take not the heat.

27

II,4,1613

No abuse!

28

II,4,1632

Answer, thou dead elm, answer.

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