Speeches (Lines) for Hostess Quickly
in "Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 49

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,720

Master Fang, have you ent'red the action?

2

II,1,722

Where's your yeoman? Is't a lusty yeoman? Will 'a
to't?

3

II,1,726

O Lord, ay! good Master Snare.

4

II,1,729

Yea, good Master Snare; I have ent'red him and all.

5

II,1,731

Alas the day! take heed of him; he stabb'd me in mine
house, and that most beastly. In good faith, 'a cares not...

6

II,1,738

No, nor I neither; I'll be at your elbow.

7

II,1,740

I am undone by his going; I warrant you, he's an
infinitive thing upon my score. Good Master Fang, hold him...

8

II,1,770

Throw me in the channel! I'll throw thee in the
Wilt thou? wilt thou? thou bastardly rogue! Murder, murder!...

9

II,1,780

Good people, bring a rescue or two. Thou wot, wot
thou wot, wot ta? Do, do, thou rogue! do, thou hemp-seed!

10

II,1,787

Good my lord, be good to me. I beseech you, stand to

11

II,1,793

O My most worshipful lord, an't please your Grace, I
poor widow of Eastcheap, and he is arrested at my suit.

12

II,1,797

It is more than for some, my lord; it is for all—all
have. He hath eaten me out of house and home; he hath put all...

13

II,1,812

Marry, if thou wert an honest man, thyself and the
too. Thou didst swear to me upon a parcel-gilt goblet,...

14

II,1,857

Yea, in truth, my lord.

15

II,1,880

Faith, you said so before.

16

II,1,882

By this heavenly ground I tread on, I must be fain to
both my plate and the tapestry of my dining-chambers.

17

II,1,898

Pray thee, Sir John, let it be but twenty nobles;
i' faith, I am loath to pawn my plate, so God save me, la!

18

II,1,902

Well, you shall have it, though I pawn my gown.
I hope you'll come to supper. you'll pay me all together?

19

II,1,907

Will you have Doll Tearsheet meet you at supper?

20

II,4,1256

I' faith, sweetheart, methinks now you are in an
good temperality. Your pulsidge beats as extraordinarily as...

21

II,4,1268

Why, that's well said; a good heart's worth gold.
Lo, here comes Sir John.

22

II,4,1275

Sick of a calm; yea, good faith.

23

II,4,1299

By my troth, this is the old fashion; you two never
but you fall to some discord. You are both, i' good truth, as...

24

II,4,1321

If he swagger, let him not come here. No, by my faith!
must live among my neighbours; I'll no swaggerers. I am in...

25

II,4,1330

Pray ye, pacify yourself, Sir John; there comes no
swaggerers here.

26

II,4,1333

Tilly-fally, Sir John, ne'er tell me; and your ancient
swagg'rer comes not in my doors. I was before Master Tisick,...

27

II,4,1359

Cheater, call you him? I will bar no honest man my
nor no cheater; but I do not love swaggering, by my troth. I...

28

II,4,1367

Do I? Yea, in very truth, do I, an 'twere an aspen
cannot abide swagg'rers.

29

II,4,1378

Come, I'll drink no proofs nor no bullets. I'll drink
more than will do me good, for no man's pleasure, I.

30

II,4,1397

No, good Captain Pistol; not here, sweet captain.

31

II,4,1424

Good Captain Peesel, be quiet; 'tis very late, i'
beseek you now, aggravate your choler.

32

II,4,1434

By my troth, Captain, these are very bitter words.

33

II,4,1440

O' my word, Captain, there's none such here. What the
good-year! do you think I would deny her? For God's sake, be...

34

II,4,1468

Here's goodly stuff toward!

35

II,4,1473

Here's a goodly tumult! I'll forswear keeping house
I'll be in these tirrits and frights. So; murder, I warrant...

36

II,4,1482

Are you not hurt i' th' groin? Methought 'a made a
thrust at your belly.

37

II,4,1584

O, the Lord preserve thy Grace! By my troth, welcome
London. Now the Lord bless that sweet face of thine. O Jesu, are you come from Wales?

38

II,4,1597

God's blessing of your good heart! and so she is, by
troth.

39

II,4,1646

No, I warrant you.

40

II,4,1654

All vict'lers do so. What's a joint of mutton or two
whole Lent?

41

II,4,1661

Who knocks so loud at door? Look to th' door there,
Francis.

42

II,4,1695

Well, fare thee well. I have known thee these
years, come peascod-time; but an honester and truer-hearted

43

II,4,1700

What's the matter?

44

II,4,1702

O, run Doll, run, run, good Come. [To BARDOLPH] She
comes blubber'd.—Yea, will you come, Doll? Exeunt

45

V,4,3558

No, thou arrant knave; I would to God that I might die,
that I might have thee hang'd. Thou hast drawn my shoulder out of...

46

V,4,3568

O the Lord, that Sir John were come! He would make this a
bloody day to somebody. But I pray God the fruit of her womb...

47

V,4,3579

O God, that right should thus overcome might!
Well, of sufferance comes ease.

48

V,4,3582

Ay, come, you starv'd bloodhound.

49

V,4,3584

Thou atomy, thou!

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