Speeches (Lines) for Romeo
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 163

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,183

Is the day so young?

2

I,1,185

Ay me! sad hours seem long.
Was that my father that went hence so fast?

3

I,1,188

Not having that, which, having, makes them short.

4

I,1,190

Out—

5

I,1,192

Out of her favour, where I am in love.

6

I,1,195

Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still,
Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will!...

7

I,1,210

Good heart, at what?

8

I,1,212

Why, such is love's transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,...

9

I,1,225

Tut, I have lost myself; I am not here;
This is not Romeo, he's some other where.

10

I,1,228

What, shall I groan and tell thee?

11

I,1,231

Bid a sick man in sadness make his will:
Ah, word ill urged to one that is so ill!...

12

I,1,235

A right good mark-man! And she's fair I love.

13

I,1,237

Well, in that hit you miss: she'll not be hit
With Cupid's arrow; she hath Dian's wit;...

14

I,1,247

She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste,
For beauty starved with her severity...

15

I,1,255

O, teach me how I should forget to think.

16

I,1,258

'Tis the way
To call hers exquisite, in question more:...

17

I,2,325

Your plaintain-leaf is excellent for that.

18

I,2,327

For your broken shin.

19

I,2,329

Not mad, but bound more than a mad-man is;
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,...

20

I,2,333

Ay, mine own fortune in my misery.

21

I,2,336

Ay, if I know the letters and the language.

22

I,2,338

Stay, fellow; I can read.
[Reads]...

23

I,2,349

Whither?

24

I,2,351

Whose house?

25

I,2,353

Indeed, I should have ask'd you that before.

26

I,2,365

When the devout religion of mine eye
Maintains such falsehood, then turn tears to fires;...

27

I,2,377

I'll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendor of mine own.

28

I,4,497

What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?
Or shall we on without a apology?

29

I,4,507

Give me a torch: I am not for this ambling;
Being but heavy, I will bear the light.

30

I,4,510

Not I, believe me: you have dancing shoes
With nimble soles: I have a soul of lead...

31

I,4,515

I am too sore enpierced with his shaft
To soar with his light feathers, and so bound,...

32

I,4,521

Is love a tender thing? it is too rough,
Too rude, too boisterous, and it pricks like thorn.

33

I,4,531

A torch for me: let wantons light of heart
Tickle the senseless rushes with their heels,...

34

I,4,540

Nay, that's not so.

35

I,4,545

And we mean well in going to this mask;
But 'tis no wit to go.

36

I,4,548

I dream'd a dream to-night.

37

I,4,550

Well, what was yours?

38

I,4,552

In bed asleep, while they do dream things true.

39

I,4,596

Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace!
Thou talk'st of nothing.

40

I,4,608

I fear, too early: for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars...

41

I,5,662

[To a Servingman] What lady is that, which doth
enrich the hand...

42

I,5,666

O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night...

43

I,5,719

[To JULIET] If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:...

44

I,5,727

Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?

45

I,5,729

O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do;
They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.

46

I,5,732

Then move not, while my prayer's effect I take.
Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purged.

47

I,5,735

Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged!
Give me my sin again.

48

I,5,739

What is her mother?

49

I,5,746

Is she a Capulet?
O dear account! my life is my foe's debt.

50

I,5,749

Ay, so I fear; the more is my unrest.

51

II,1,796

Can I go forward when my heart is here?
Turn back, dull earth, and find thy centre out.

52

II,2,845

He jests at scars that never felt a wound.
[JULIET appears above at a window]...

53

II,2,872

She speaks:
O, speak again, bright angel! for thou art...

54

II,2,884

[Aside] Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

55

II,2,897

I take thee at thy word:
Call me but love, and I'll be new baptized;...

56

II,2,902

By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:...

57

II,2,910

Neither, fair saint, if either thee dislike.

58

II,2,915

With love's light wings did I o'er-perch these walls;
For stony limits cannot hold love out,...

59

II,2,920

Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of their swords: look thou but sweet,...

60

II,2,924

I have night's cloak to hide me from their sight;
And but thou love me, let them find me here:...

61

II,2,929

By love, who first did prompt me to inquire;
He lent me counsel and I lent him eyes....

62

II,2,956

Lady, by yonder blessed moon I swear
That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops—

63

II,2,961

What shall I swear by?

64

II,2,966

If my heart's dear love—

65

II,2,976

O, wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied?

66

II,2,978

The exchange of thy love's faithful vow for mine.

67

II,2,981

Wouldst thou withdraw it? for what purpose, love?

68

II,2,992

O blessed, blessed night! I am afeard.
Being in night, all this is but a dream,...

69

II,2,1010

So thrive my soul—

70

II,2,1013

A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.
Love goes toward love, as schoolboys from...

71

II,2,1025

It is my soul that calls upon my name:
How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night,...

72

II,2,1029

My dear?

73

II,2,1032

At the hour of nine.

74

II,2,1035

Let me stand here till thou remember it.

75

II,2,1038

And I'll still stay, to have thee still forget,
Forgetting any other home but this.

76

II,2,1046

I would I were thy bird.

77

II,2,1053

Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast!
Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest!...

78

II,3,1090

Good morrow, father.

79

II,3,1103

That last is true; the sweeter rest was mine.

80

II,3,1105

With Rosaline, my ghostly father? no;
I have forgot that name, and that name's woe.

81

II,3,1108

I'll tell thee, ere thou ask it me again.
I have been feasting with mine enemy,...

82

II,3,1117

Then plainly know my heart's dear love is set
On the fair daughter of rich Capulet:...

83

II,3,1141

Thou chid'st me oft for loving Rosaline.

84

II,3,1143

And bad'st me bury love.

85

II,3,1146

I pray thee, chide not; she whom I love now
Doth grace for grace and love for love allow;...

86

II,3,1155

O, let us hence; I stand on sudden haste.

87

II,4,1208

Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

88

II,4,1210

Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great; and in
such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.

89

II,4,1214

Meaning, to court'sy.

90

II,4,1216

A most courteous exposition.

91

II,4,1218

Pink for flower.

92

II,4,1220

Why, then is my pump well flowered.

93

II,4,1224

O single-soled jest, solely singular for the
singleness.

94

II,4,1227

Switch and spurs, switch and spurs; or I'll cry a match.

95

II,4,1232

Thou wast never with me for any thing when thou wast
not there for the goose.

96

II,4,1235

Nay, good goose, bite not.

97

II,4,1238

And is it not well served in to a sweet goose?

98

II,4,1241

I stretch it out for that word 'broad;' which added
to the goose, proves thee far and wide a broad goose.

99

II,4,1254

Here's goodly gear!

100

II,4,1269

One, gentlewoman, that God hath made for himself to
mar.

101

II,4,1274

I can tell you; but young Romeo will be older when
you have found him than he was when you sought him:...

102

II,4,1284

What hast thou found?

103

II,4,1296

I will follow you.

104

II,4,1303

A gentleman, nurse, that loves to hear himself talk,
and will speak more in a minute than he will stand...

105

II,4,1326

Nurse, commend me to thy lady and mistress. I
protest unto thee—

106

II,4,1330

What wilt thou tell her, nurse? thou dost not mark me.

107

II,4,1333

Bid her devise
Some means to come to shrift this afternoon;...

108

II,4,1338

Go to; I say you shall.

109

II,4,1340

And stay, good nurse, behind the abbey wall:
Within this hour my man shall be with thee...

110

II,4,1348

What say'st thou, my dear nurse?

111

II,4,1351

I warrant thee, my man's as true as steel.

112

II,4,1361

Ay, nurse; what of that? both with an R.

113

II,4,1367

Commend me to thy lady.

114

II,6,1461

Amen, amen! but come what sorrow can,
It cannot countervail the exchange of joy...

115

II,6,1483

Ah, Juliet, if the measure of thy joy
Be heap'd like mine and that thy skill be more...

116

III,1,1560

Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage...

117

III,1,1566

I do protest, I never injured thee,
But love thee better than thou canst devise,...

118

III,1,1584

Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.

119

III,1,1587

Draw, Benvolio; beat down their weapons.
Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage!...

120

III,1,1600

Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much.

121

III,1,1610

I thought all for the best.

122

III,1,1616

This gentleman, the prince's near ally,
My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt...

123

III,1,1627

This day's black fate on more days doth depend;
This but begins the woe, others must end.

124

III,1,1630

Alive, in triumph! and Mercutio slain!
Away to heaven, respective lenity,...

125

III,1,1641

This shall determine that.

126

III,1,1647

O, I am fortune's fool!

127

III,3,1874

Father, what news? what is the prince's doom?
What sorrow craves acquaintance at my hand,...

128

III,3,1880

What less than dooms-day is the prince's doom?

129

III,3,1883

Ha, banishment! be merciful, say 'death;'
For exile hath more terror in his look,...

130

III,3,1888

There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself....

131

III,3,1900

'Tis torture, and not mercy: heaven is here,
Where Juliet lives; and every cat and dog...

132

III,3,1924

O, thou wilt speak again of banishment.

133

III,3,1928

Yet 'banished'? Hang up philosophy!
Unless philosophy can make a Juliet,...

134

III,3,1933

How should they, when that wise men have no eyes?

135

III,3,1935

Thou canst not speak of that thou dost not feel:
Wert thou as young as I, Juliet thy love,...

136

III,3,1944

Not I; unless the breath of heartsick groans,
Mist-like, infold me from the search of eyes.

137

III,3,1969

Nurse!

138

III,3,1971

Spakest thou of Juliet? how is it with her?
Doth she not think me an old murderer,...

139

III,3,1981

As if that name,
Shot from the deadly level of a gun,...

140

III,3,2043

Do so, and bid my sweet prepare to chide.

141

III,3,2047

How well my comfort is revived by this!

142

III,3,2055

But that a joy past joy calls out on me,
It were a grief, so brief to part with thee: Farewell.

143

III,5,2103

It was the lark, the herald of the morn,
No nightingale: look, love, what envious streaks...

144

III,5,2114

Let me be ta'en, let me be put to death;
I am content, so thou wilt have it so....

145

III,5,2133

More light and light; more dark and dark our woes!

146

III,5,2141

Farewell, farewell! one kiss, and I'll descend.

147

III,5,2148

Farewell!
I will omit no opportunity...

148

III,5,2152

I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in our time to come.

149

III,5,2158

And trust me, love, in my eye so do you:
Dry sorrow drinks our blood. Adieu, adieu!

150

V,1,2805

If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep,
My dreams presage some joyful news at hand:...

151

V,1,2830

Is it even so? then I defy you, stars!
Thou know'st my lodging: get me ink and paper,...

152

V,1,2836

Tush, thou art deceived:
Leave me, and do the thing I bid thee do....

153

V,1,2840

No matter: get thee gone,
And hire those horses; I'll be with thee straight....

154

V,1,2869

Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor:
Hold, there is forty ducats: let me have...

155

V,1,2879

Art thou so bare and full of wretchedness,
And fear'st to die? famine is in thy cheeks,...

156

V,1,2887

I pay thy poverty, and not thy will.

157

V,1,2891

There is thy gold, worse poison to men's souls,
Doing more murders in this loathsome world,...

158

V,3,2959

Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.
Hold, take this letter; early in the morning...

159

V,3,2978

So shalt thou show me friendship. Take thou that:
Live, and be prosperous: and farewell, good fellow.

160

V,3,2983

Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth,...

161

V,3,2998

I must indeed; and therefore came I hither.
Good gentle youth, tempt not a desperate man;...

162

V,3,3010

Wilt thou provoke me? then have at thee, boy!

163

V,3,3019

In faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.
Mercutio's kinsman, noble County Paris!...

Return to the "Romeo and Juliet" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS