Speeches (Lines) for Robert Shallow
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 59

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,2

Sir Hugh, persuade me not; I will make a Star-
chamber matter of it: if he were twenty Sir John...

2

I,1,7

Ay, cousin Slender, and 'Custalourum.

3

I,1,11

Ay, that I do; and have done any time these three
hundred years.

4

I,1,16

It is an old coat.

5

I,1,20

The luce is the fresh fish; the salt fish is an old coat.

6

I,1,22

You may, by marrying.

7

I,1,24

Not a whit.

8

I,1,32

The council shall bear it; it is a riot.

9

I,1,37

Ha! o' my life, if I were young again, the sword
should end it.

10

I,1,58

Well, let us see honest Master Page. Is Falstaff there?

11

I,1,74

Master Page, I am glad to see you: much good do it
your good heart! I wished your venison better; it...

12

I,1,79

Sir, I thank you; by yea and no, I do.

13

I,1,85

That he will not. 'Tis your fault, 'tis your fault;
'tis a good dog.

14

I,1,88

Sir, he's a good dog, and a fair dog: can there be
more said? he is good and fair. Is Sir John...

15

I,1,94

He hath wronged me, Master Page.

16

I,1,96

If it be confessed, it is not redress'd: is not that
so, Master Page? He hath wronged me; indeed he...

17

I,1,103

Knight, you have beaten my men, killed my deer, and
broke open my lodge.

18

I,1,106

Tut, a pin! this shall be answered.

19

I,1,109

The council shall know this.

20

I,1,191

Come, coz; come, coz; we stay for you. A word with
you, coz; marry, this, coz: there is, as 'twere, a...

21

I,1,197

Nay, but understand me.

22

I,1,206

Ay, there's the point, sir.

23

I,1,215

Cousin Abraham Slender, can you love her?

24

I,1,221

That you must. Will you, upon good dowry, marry her?

25

I,1,224

Nay, conceive me, conceive me, sweet coz: what I do
is to pleasure you, coz. Can you love the maid?

26

I,1,236

Ay, I think my cousin meant well.

27

I,1,238

Here comes fair Mistress Anne.
[Re-enter ANNE PAGE]...

28

I,1,243

I will wait on him, fair Mistress Anne.

29

II,1,753

I follow, mine host, I follow. Good even and
twenty, good Master Page! Master Page, will you go...

30

II,1,757

Sir, there is a fray to be fought between Sir Hugh
the Welsh priest and Caius the French doctor.

31

II,1,762

[To PAGE] Will you go with us to behold it? My
merry host hath had the measuring of their weapons;...

32

II,1,776

Have with you, mine host.

33

II,1,779

Tut, sir, I could have told you more. In these times
you stand on distance, your passes, stoccadoes, and...

34

II,3,1118

Save you, Master Doctor Caius!

35

II,3,1134

He is the wiser man, master doctor: he is a curer of
souls, and you a curer of bodies; if you should...

36

II,3,1140

Bodykins, Master Page, though I now be old and of
the peace, if I see a sword out, my finger itches to...

37

II,3,1146

It will be found so, Master Page. Master Doctor
Caius, I am come to fetch you home. I am sworn of...

38

II,3,1171

We will do it.

39

III,1,1229

How now, master Parson! Good morrow, good Sir Hugh.
Keep a gamester from the dice, and a good student...

40

III,1,1235

What, the sword and the word! do you study them
both, master parson?

41

III,1,1246

I have lived fourscore years and upward; I never
heard a man of his place, gravity and learning, so...

42

III,1,1259

[Aside] O sweet Anne Page!

43

III,1,1260

It appears so by his weapons. Keep them asunder:
here comes Doctor Caius.

44

III,1,1264

So do you, good master doctor.

45

III,1,1299

Trust me, a mad host. Follow, gentlemen, follow.

46

III,2,1361

[with Page and others] Well met, Master Ford.

47

III,2,1364

I must excuse myself, Master Ford.

48

III,2,1368

We have lingered about a match between Anne Page and
my cousin Slender, and this day we shall have our answer.

49

III,2,1391

Well, fare you well: we shall have the freer wooing
at Master Page's.

50

III,4,1655

Break their talk, Mistress Quickly: my kinsman shall
speak for himself.

51

III,4,1659

Be not dismayed.

52

III,4,1669

She's coming; to her, coz. O boy, thou hadst a father!

53

III,4,1674

Mistress Anne, my cousin loves you.

54

III,4,1677

He will maintain you like a gentlewoman.

55

III,4,1680

He will make you a hundred and fifty pounds jointure.

56

III,4,1682

Marry, I thank you for it; I thank you for that good
comfort. She calls you, coz: I'll leave you.

57

IV,2,2085

Indeed, Master Ford, this is not well, indeed.

58

IV,2,2110

By my fidelity, this is not well, Master Ford; this
wrongs you.

59

V,2,2519

That's good too: but what needs either your 'mum'
or her 'budget?' the white will decipher her well...

Return to the "Merry Wives of Windsor" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS