Speeches (Lines) for Sicinius Velutus
in "Coriolanus"

Total: 117

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,275

Was ever man so proud as is this CORIOLANUS?

2

I,1,277

When we were chosen tribunes for the people,—

3

I,1,279

Nay. but his taunts.

4

I,1,281

Be-mock the modest moon.

5

I,1,284

Such a nature,
Tickled with good success, disdains the shadow...

6

I,1,297

Besides, if things go well,
Opinion that so sticks on CORIOLANUS shall...

7

I,1,305

Let's hence, and hear
How the dispatch is made, and in what fashion,...

8

II,1,922

Nature teaches beasts to know their friends.

9

II,1,924

The lamb.

10

II,1,934

Especially in pride.

11

II,1,960

Menenius, you are known well enough too.

12

II,1,1160

On the sudden,
I warrant him consul.

13

II,1,1164

He cannot temperately transport his honours
From where he should begin and end, but will...

14

II,1,1168

Doubt not
The commoners, for whom we stand, but they...

15

II,1,1180

'Tis right.

16

II,1,1184

I wish no better
Than have him hold that purpose and to put it...

17

II,1,1188

It shall be to him then as our good wills,
A sure destruction.

18

II,1,1201

This, as you say, suggested
At some time when his soaring insolence...

19

II,1,1222

Have with you.

20

II,2,1288

We are convented
Upon a pleasing treaty, and have hearts...

21

II,2,1395

Sir, the people
Must have their voices; neither will they bate...

22

II,2,1417

May they perceive's intent! He will require them,
As if he did contemn what he requested...

23

II,3,1579

The custom of request you have discharged:
The people do admit you, and are summon'd...

24

II,3,1583

There, Coriolanus.

25

II,3,1585

You may, sir.

26

II,3,1590

Fare you well.
[Exeunt CORIOLANUS and MENENIUS]...

27

II,3,1597

How now, my masters! have you chose this man?

28

II,3,1608

Why, so he did, I am sure.

29

II,3,1620

Why either were you ignorant to see't,
Or, seeing it, of such childish friendliness...

30

II,3,1638

Thus to have said,
As you were fore-advised, had touch'd his spirit...

31

II,3,1655

Have you
Ere now denied the asker? and now again...

32

II,3,1668

Let them assemble,
And on a safer judgment all revoke...

33

II,3,1682

Say, you chose him
More after our commandment than as guided...

34

II,3,1699

One thus descended,
That hath beside well in his person wrought...

35

II,3,1719

To the Capitol, come:
We will be there before the stream o' the people;...

36

III,1,1756

Pass no further.

37

III,1,1766

Stop,
Or all will fall in broil.

38

III,1,1794

You show too much of that
For which the people stir: if you will pass...

39

III,1,1832

'Twere well
We let the people know't.

40

III,1,1838

It is a mind
That shall remain a poison where it is,...

41

III,1,1925

Has spoken like a traitor, and shall answer
As traitors do.

42

III,1,1936

This a consul? no.

43

III,1,1940

Go, call the people:
[Exit AEdile]...

44

III,1,1951

Help, ye citizens!
[Enter a rabble of Citizens (Plebeians), with]...

45

III,1,1955

Here's he that would take from you all your power.

46

III,1,1967

Hear me, people; peace!

47

III,1,1969

You are at point to lose your liberties:
CORIOLANUS would have all from you; CORIOLANUS,...

48

III,1,1975

What is the city but the people?

49

III,1,1986

This deserves death.

50

III,1,1992

Therefore lay hold of him;
Bear him to the rock Tarpeian, and from thence...

51

III,1,2067

Where is this viper
That would depopulate the city and...

52

III,1,2071

He shall be thrown down the Tarpeian rock
With rigorous hands: he hath resisted law,...

53

III,1,2081

Peace!

54

III,1,2084

Sir, how comes't that you
Have holp to make this rescue?

55

III,1,2089

Consul! what consul?

56

III,1,2097

Speak briefly then;
For we are peremptory to dispatch...

57

III,1,2108

He's a disease that must be cut away.

58

III,1,2118

This is clean kam.

59

III,1,2135

What do ye talk?
Have we not had a taste of his obedience?...

60

III,1,2149

Noble Menenius,
Be you then as the people's officer....

61

III,1,2153

Meet on the market-place. We'll attend you there:
Where, if you bring not CORIOLANUS, we'll proceed...

62

III,3,2352

Have you a catalogue
Of all the voices that we have procured...

63

III,3,2356

Have you collected them by tribes?

64

III,3,2358

Assemble presently the people hither;
And when they bear me say 'It shall be so...

65

III,3,2371

Make them be strong and ready for this hint,
When we shall hap to give 't them.

66

III,3,2381

Well, here he comes.
[Enter CORIOLANUS, MENENIUS, and COMINIUS,]...

67

III,3,2394

Draw near, ye people.

68

III,3,2400

I do demand,
If you submit you to the people's voices,...

69

III,3,2423

Answer to us.

70

III,3,2425

We charge you, that you have contrived to take
From Rome all season'd office and to wind...

71

III,3,2438

Mark you this, people?

72

III,3,2440

Peace!
We need not put new matter to his charge:...

73

III,3,2462

For that he has,
As much as in him lies, from time to time...

74

III,3,2478

He's sentenced; no more hearing.

75

III,3,2487

We know your drift: speak what?

76

III,3,2513

Go, see him out at gates, and follow him,
As he hath followed you, with all despite;...

77

IV,2,2588

Bid them all home; he's gone, and we'll no further.
The nobility are vex'd, whom we see have sided...

78

IV,2,2594

Bid them home:
Say their great enemy is gone, and they...

79

IV,2,2600

Let's not meet her.

80

IV,2,2602

They say she's mad.

81

IV,2,2614

Are you mankind?

82

IV,2,2619

O blessed heavens!

83

IV,2,2625

What then?

84

IV,2,2631

I would he had continued to his country
As he began, and not unknit himself...

85

IV,2,2647

Why stay we to be baited
With one that wants her wits?

86

IV,6,3006

We hear not of him, neither need we fear him;
His remedies are tame i' the present peace...

87

IV,6,3018

'Tis he,'tis he: O, he is grown most kind of late.

88

IV,6,3021

Your Coriolanus
Is not much miss'd, but with his friends:...

89

IV,6,3027

Where is he, hear you?

90

IV,6,3032

God-den, our neighbours.

91

IV,6,3036

Live, and thrive!

92

IV,6,3042

This is a happier and more comely time
Than when these fellows ran about the streets,...

93

IV,6,3049

And affecting one sole throne,
Without assistance.

94

IV,6,3052

We should by this, to all our lamentation,
If he had gone forth consul, found it so.

95

IV,6,3068

Come, what talk you
Of CORIOLANUS?

96

IV,6,3080

Tell not me:
I know this cannot be.

97

IV,6,3087

'Tis this slave;—
Go whip him, 'fore the people's eyes:—his raising;...

98

IV,6,3093

What more fearful?

99

IV,6,3099

This is most likely!

100

IV,6,3102

The very trick on't.

101

IV,6,3201

Go, masters, get you home; be not dismay'd:
These are a side that would be glad to have...

102

IV,6,3211

Nor I.

103

IV,6,3214

Pray, let us go.

104

V,1,3315

Nay, pray, be patient: if you refuse your aid
In this so never-needed help, yet do not...

105

V,1,3322

Pray you, go to him.

106

V,1,3331

Yet your good will
must have that thanks from Rome, after the measure...

107

V,1,3353

Not?

108

V,4,3732

Why, what of that?

109

V,4,3738

Is't possible that so short a time can alter the
condition of a man!

110

V,4,3744

He loved his mother dearly.

111

V,4,3755

Yes, mercy, if you report him truly.

112

V,4,3761

The gods be good unto us!

113

V,4,3772

What's the news?

114

V,4,3777

Friend,
Art thou certain this is true? is it most certain?

115

V,4,3796

First, the gods bless you for your tidings; next,
Accept my thankfulness.

116

V,4,3800

They are near the city?

117

V,4,3802

We will meet them,
And help the joy.

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