Speeches (Lines) for Volumnia
in "Coriolanus"

Total: 57

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,363

I pray you, daughter, sing; or express yourself in a
more comfortable sort: if my son were my husband, I...

2

I,3,382

Then his good report should have been my son; I
therein would have found issue. Hear me profess...

3

I,3,391

Indeed, you shall not.
Methinks I hear hither your husband's drum,...

4

I,3,402

Away, you fool! it more becomes a man
Than gilt his trophy: the breasts of Hecuba,...

5

I,3,410

He'll beat Aufidius 'head below his knee
And tread upon his neck.

6

I,3,414

Sweet madam.

7

I,3,420

He had rather see the swords, and hear a drum, than
look upon his school-master.

8

I,3,432

One on 's father's moods.

9

I,3,439

She shall, she shall.

10

I,3,446

Why, I pray you?

11

I,3,469

Let her alone, lady: as she is now, she will but
disease our better mirth.

12

II,1,1017

Honourable Menenius, my boy CORIOLANUS approaches; for
the love of Juno, let's go.

13

II,1,1020

Ay, worthy Menenius; and with most prosperous
approbation.

14

II,1,1024

[together with Virgilia] Nay, 'tis true.

15

II,1,1026

Look, here's a letter from him: the state hath
another, his wife another; and, I think, there's one...

16

II,1,1039

O, he is wounded; I thank the gods for't.

17

II,1,1042

On's brows: Menenius, he comes the third time home
with the oaken garland.

18

II,1,1045

Titus TITUS writes, they fought together, but
Aufidius got off.

19

II,1,1051

Good ladies, let's go. Yes, yes, yes; the senate
has letters from the general, wherein he gives my...

20

II,1,1059

True! pow, wow.

21

II,1,1065

I' the shoulder and i' the left arm there will be
large cicatrices to show the people, when he shall...

22

II,1,1071

He had, before this last expedition, twenty-five
wounds upon him.

23

II,1,1076

These are the ushers of CORIOLANUS: before him he
carries noise, and behind him he leaves tears:...

24

II,1,1098

Nay, my good soldier, up;
My gentle CORIOLANUS, worthy Caius, and...

25

II,1,1112

I know not where to turn: O, welcome home:
And welcome, general: and ye're welcome all.

26

II,1,1132

I have lived
To see inherited my very wishes...

27

III,2,2182

O, sir, sir, sir,
I would have had you put your power well on,...

28

III,2,2186

You might have been enough the man you are,
With striving less to be so; lesser had been...

29

III,2,2200

Pray, be counsell'd:
I have a heart as little apt as yours,...

30

III,2,2215

You are too absolute;
Though therein you can never be too noble,...

31

III,2,2224

If it be honour in your wars to seem
The same you are not, which, for your best ends,...

32

III,2,2231

Because that now it lies you on to speak
To the people; not by your own instruction,...

33

III,2,2253

I prithee now, my son,
Go to them, with this bonnet in thy hand;...

34

III,2,2272

Prithee now,
Go, and be ruled: although I know thou hadst rather...

35

III,2,2283

He must, and will
Prithee now, say you will, and go about it.

36

III,2,2294

I prithee now, sweet son, as thou hast said
My praises made thee first a soldier, so,...

37

III,2,2312

At thy choice, then:
To beg of thee, it is my more dishonour...

38

III,2,2328

Do your will.

39

IV,3,2535

Now the red pestilence strike all trades in Rome,
And occupations perish!

40

IV,3,2557

My first son.
Whither wilt thou go? Take good Cominius...

41

IV,2,2605

O, ye're well met: the hoarded plague o' the gods
Requite your love!

42

IV,2,2608

If that I could for weeping, you should hear,—
Nay, and you shall hear some....

43

IV,2,2615

Ay, fool; is that a shame? Note but this fool.
Was not a man my father? Hadst thou foxship...

44

IV,2,2620

More noble blows than ever thou wise words;
And for Rome's good. I'll tell thee what; yet go:...

45

IV,2,2628

Bastards and all.
Good man, the wounds that he does bear for Rome!

46

IV,2,2635

'I would he had'! 'Twas you incensed the rabble:
Cats, that can judge as fitly of his worth...

47

IV,2,2640

Now, pray, sir, get you gone:
You have done a brave deed. Ere you go, hear this:—...

48

IV,2,2649

Take my prayers with you.
[Exeunt Tribunes]...

49

IV,2,2657

Anger's my meat; I sup upon myself,
And so shall starve with feeding. Come, let's go:...

50

V,3,3550

O, stand up blest!
Whilst, with no softer cushion than the flint,...

51

V,3,3563

Thou art my warrior;
I holp to frame thee. Do you know this lady?

52

V,3,3569

This is a poor epitome of yours,
Which by the interpretation of full time...

53

V,3,3578

Your knee, sirrah.

54

V,3,3580

Even he, your wife, this lady, and myself,
Are suitors to you.

55

V,3,3591

O, no more, no more!
You have said you will not grant us any thing;...

56

V,3,3599

Should we be silent and not speak, our raiment
And state of bodies would bewray what life...

57

V,3,3642

Nay, go not from us thus.
If it were so that our request did tend...

Return to the "Coriolanus" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS