Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Warwick
in "Henry VI, Part III"

Total: 99

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,3

I wonder how the king escaped our hands.

2

I,1,24

And so do I. Victorious Prince of York,
Before I see thee seated in that throne...

3

I,1,37

And when the king comes, offer no violence,
Unless he seek to thrust you out perforce.

4

I,1,43

The bloody parliament shall this be call'd,
Unless Plantagenet, Duke of York, be king,...

5

I,1,49

Neither the king, nor he that loves him best,
The proudest he that holds up Lancaster,...

6

I,1,87

Exeter, thou art a traitor to the crown
In following this usurping Henry.

7

I,1,90

True, Clifford; and that's Richard Duke of York.

8

I,1,93

Be Duke of Lancaster; let him be king.

9

I,1,96

And Warwick shall disprove it. You forget
That we are those which chased you from the field...

10

I,1,108

Poor Clifford! how I scorn his worthless threats!

11

I,1,117

Talk not of France, sith thou hast lost it all.

12

I,1,128

Plantagenet shall speak first: hear him, lords;
And be you silent and attentive too,...

13

I,1,138

Prove it, Henry, and thou shalt be king.

14

I,1,150

Suppose, my lords, he did it unconstrain'd,
Think you 'twere prejudicial to his crown?

15

I,1,161

Deposed he shall be, in despite of all.

16

I,1,173

Do right unto this princely Duke of York,
Or I will fill the house with armed men,...

17

I,1,186

What good is this to England and himself!

18

I,1,199

Turn this way, Henry, and regard them not.

19

I,1,202

Why should you sigh, my lord?

20

I,1,213

Long live King Henry! Plantagenet embrace him.

21

I,1,219

And I'll keep London with my soldiers.

22

II,1,723

How now, fair lords! What fare? what news abroad?

23

II,1,732

Ten days ago I drown'd these news in tears;
And now, to add more measure to your woes,...

24

II,1,772

Some six miles off the duke is with the soldiers;
And for your brother, he was lately sent...

25

II,1,779

Nor now my scandal, Richard, dost thou hear;
For thou shalt know this strong right hand of mine...

26

II,1,794

Why, therefore Warwick came to seek you out;
And therefore comes my brother Montague....

27

II,1,820

No longer Earl of March, but Duke of York:
The next degree is England's royal throne;...

28

II,1,834

How now! what news?

29

II,1,838

Why then it sorts, brave warriors, let's away.

30

II,2,946

What say'st thou, Henry, wilt thou yield the crown?

31

II,2,950

Then 'twas my turn to fly, and now 'tis thine.

32

II,2,952

'Twas not your valour, Clifford, drove me thence.

33

II,2,974

If thou deny, their blood upon thy head;
For York in justice puts his armour on.

34

II,3,1026

Forspent with toil, as runners with a race,
I lay me down a little while to breathe;...

35

II,3,1034

How now, my lord! what hap? what hope of good?

36

II,3,1051

Then let the earth be drunken with our blood:
I'll kill my horse, because I will not fly....

37

II,3,1076

Away, away! Once more, sweet lords farewell.

38

II,6,1291

No, 'tis impossible he should escape,
For, though before his face I speak the words...

39

II,6,1305

From off the gates of York fetch down the head,
Your father's head, which Clifford placed there;...

40

II,6,1313

I think his understanding is bereft.
Speak, Clifford, dost thou know who speaks to thee?...

41

II,6,1324

Clifford, devise excuses for thy faults.

42

II,6,1329

They mock thee, Clifford: swear as thou wast wont.

43

II,6,1339

Ay, but he's dead: off with the traitor's head,
And rear it in the place your father's stands....

44

II,6,1362

Tut, that's a foolish observation:
Richard, be Duke of Gloucester. Now to London,...

45

III,3,1742

From worthy Edward, King of Albion,
My lord and sovereign, and thy vowed friend,...

46

III,3,1752

[To BONA] And, gracious madam, in our king's behalf,
I am commanded, with your leave and favour,...

47

III,3,1771

Injurious Margaret!

48

III,3,1773

Because thy father Henry did usurp;
And thou no more are prince than she is queen.

49

III,3,1782

Oxford, how haps it, in this smooth discourse,
You told not how Henry the Sixth hath lost...

50

III,3,1792

Can Oxford, that did ever fence the right,
Now buckler falsehood with a pedigree?...

51

III,3,1802

And I the house of York.

52

III,3,1811

Thereon I pawn my credit and mine honour.

53

III,3,1813

The more that Henry was unfortunate.

54

III,3,1817

Such it seems
As may beseem a monarch like himself....

55

III,3,1848

Henry now lives in Scotland at his ease,
Where having nothing, nothing can he lose....

56

III,3,1875

Mine, full of sorrow and heart's discontent.

57

III,3,1883

King Lewis, I here protest, in sight of heaven,
And by the hope I have of heavenly bliss,...

58

III,3,1904

So much his friend, ay, his unfeigned friend,
That, if King Lewis vouchsafe to furnish us...

59

III,3,1919

And mine, fair lady Bona, joins with yours.

60

III,3,1933

Tell him from me that he hath done me wrong,
And therefore I'll uncrown him ere't be long....

61

III,3,1944

This shall assure my constant loyalty,
That if our queen and this young prince agree,...

62

III,3,1962

I came from Edward as ambassador,
But I return his sworn and mortal foe:...

63

IV,2,2131

Trust me, my lord, all hitherto goes well;
The common people by numbers swarm to us....

64

IV,2,2137

Then, gentle Clarence, welcome unto Warwick;
And welcome, Somerset: I hold it cowardice...

65

IV,3,2188

This is his tent; and see where stand his guard.
Courage, my masters! honour now or never!...

66

IV,3,2201

Richard and Hastings: let them go; here is The duke.

67

IV,3,2204

Ay, but the case is alter'd:
When you disgraced me in my embassade,...

68

IV,3,2221

Then, for his mind, be Edward England's king:
[Takes off his crown]...

69

IV,3,2238

Ay, that's the first thing that we have to do;
To free King Henry from imprisonment...

70

IV,6,2340

Your grace hath still been famed for virtuous;
And now may seem as wise as virtuous,...

71

IV,6,2351

And I choose Clarence only for protector.

72

IV,6,2359

What answers Clarence to his sovereign's will?

73

IV,6,2362

Why, then, though loath, yet must I be content:
We'll yoke together, like a double shadow...

74

IV,6,2371

Ay, therein Clarence shall not want his part.

75

IV,6,2394

What news, my friend?

76

IV,6,2397

Unsavoury news! but how made he escape?

77

IV,6,2403

My brother was too careless of his charge.
But let us hence, my sovereign, to provide...

78

IV,8,2522

What counsel, lords? Edward from Belgia,
With hasty Germans and blunt Hollanders,...

79

IV,8,2530

In Warwickshire I have true-hearted friends,
Not mutinous in peace, yet bold in war;...

80

IV,8,2553

Farewell, sweet lords: let's meet at Coventry.

81

V,1,2593

Where is the post that came from valiant Oxford?
How far hence is thy lord, mine honest fellow?

82

V,1,2596

How far off is our brother Montague?
Where is the post that came from Montague?

83

V,1,2600

Say, Somerville, what says my loving son?
And, by thy guess, how nigh is Clarence now?

84

V,1,2605

Then Clarence is at hand, I hear his drum.

85

V,1,2608

Who should that be? belike, unlook'd-for friends.

86

V,1,2614

O unbid spite! is sportful Edward come?
Where slept our scouts, or how are they seduced,...

87

V,1,2621

Nay, rather, wilt thou draw thy forces hence,
Confess who set thee up and pluck'd thee own,...

88

V,1,2627

Is not a dukedom, sir, a goodly gift?

89

V,1,2630

'Twas I that gave the kingdom to thy brother.

90

V,1,2632

Thou art no Atlas for so great a weight:
And weakling, Warwick takes his gift again;...

91

V,1,2646

I had rather chop this hand off at a blow,
And with the other fling it at thy face,...

92

V,1,2655

O cheerful colours! see where Oxford comes!

93

V,1,2664

O, welcome, Oxford! for we want thy help.

94

V,1,2679

And lo, where George of Clarence sweeps along,
Of force enough to bid his brother battle;...

95

V,1,2710

O passing traitor, perjured and unjust!

96

V,1,2713

Alas, I am not coop'd here for defence!
I will away towards Barnet presently,...

97

V,2,2727

Ah, who is nigh? come to me, friend or foe,
And tell me who is victor, York or Warwick?...

98

V,2,2756

Why, then I would not fly. Ah, Montague,
If thou be there, sweet brother, take my hand....

99

V,2,2771

Sweet rest his soul! Fly, lords, and save yourselves;
For Warwick bids you all farewell to meet in heaven.

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