Speeches (Lines) for Malvolio
in "Twelfth Night"

Total: 87

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,5,364

Yes, and shall do till the pangs of death shake him:
infirmity, that decays the wise, doth ever make the...

2

I,5,372

I marvel your ladyship takes delight in such a
barren rascal: I saw him put down the other day...

3

I,5,432

Madam, yond young fellow swears he will speak with
you. I told him you were sick; he takes on him to...

4

I,5,440

Has been told so; and he says, he'll stand at your
door like a sheriff's post, and be the supporter to...

5

I,5,444

Why, of mankind.

6

I,5,446

Of very ill manner; he'll speak with you, will you or no.

7

I,5,448

Not yet old enough for a man, nor young enough for
a boy; as a squash is before 'tis a peascod, or a...

8

I,5,455

Gentlewoman, my lady calls.

9

I,5,596

Here, madam, at your service.

10

I,5,604

Madam, I will.

11

II,2,658

Were not you even now with the Countess Olivia?

12

II,2,661

She returns this ring to you, sir: you might have
saved me my pains, to have taken it away yourself....

13

II,2,669

Come, sir, you peevishly threw it to her; and her
will is, it should be so returned: if it be worth...

14

II,3,788

My masters, are you mad? or what are you? Have ye
no wit, manners, nor honesty, but to gabble like...

15

II,3,796

Sir Toby, I must be round with you. My lady bade me
tell you, that, though she harbours you as her...

16

II,3,806

Is't even so?

17

II,3,809

This is much credit to you.

18

II,3,821

Mistress Mary, if you prized my lady's favour at any
thing more than contempt, you would not give means...

19

II,5,1052

'Tis but fortune; all is fortune. Maria once told
me she did affect me: and I have heard herself come...

20

II,5,1063

To be Count Malvolio!

21

II,5,1067

There is example for't; the lady of the Strachy
married the yeoman of the wardrobe.

22

II,5,1072

Having been three months married to her, sitting in
my state,—

23

II,5,1075

Calling my officers about me, in my branched velvet
gown; having come from a day-bed, where I have left...

24

II,5,1080

And then to have the humour of state; and after a
demure travel of regard, telling them I know my...

25

II,5,1086

Seven of my people, with an obedient start, make
out for him: I frown the while; and perchance wind...

26

II,5,1092

I extend my hand to him thus, quenching my familiar
smile with an austere regard of control,—

27

II,5,1095

Saying, 'Cousin Toby, my fortunes having cast me on
your niece give me this prerogative of speech,'—

28

II,5,1098

'You must amend your drunkenness.'

29

II,5,1101

'Besides, you waste the treasure of your time with
a foolish knight,'—

30

II,5,1104

'One Sir Andrew,'—

31

II,5,1106

What employment have we here?

32

II,5,1111

By my life, this is my lady's hand these be her
very C's, her U's and her T's and thus makes she her...

33

II,5,1115

[Reads] 'To the unknown beloved, this, and my good
wishes:'—her very phrases! By your leave, wax....

34

II,5,1120

[Reads]
Jove knows I love: But who?...

35

II,5,1128

[Reads]
I may command where I adore;...

36

II,5,1135

'M, O, A, I, doth sway my life.' Nay, but first, let
me see, let me see, let me see.

37

II,5,1139

'I may command where I adore.' Why, she may command
me: I serve her; she is my lady. Why, this is...

38

II,5,1149

M,—Malvolio; M,—why, that begins my name.

39

II,5,1152

M,—but then there is no consonancy in the sequel;
that suffers under probation A should follow but O does.

40

II,5,1156

And then I comes behind.

41

II,5,1160

M, O, A, I; this simulation is not as the former: and
yet, to crush this a little, it would bow to me, for...

42

III,4,1563

Sweet lady, ho, ho.

43

III,4,1566

Sad, lady! I could be sad: this does make some
obstruction in the blood, this cross-gartering; but...

44

III,4,1572

Not black in my mind, though yellow in my legs. It
did come to his hands, and commands shall be...

45

III,4,1576

To bed! ay, sweet-heart, and I'll come to thee.

46

III,4,1580

At your request! yes; nightingales answer daws.

47

III,4,1582

'Be not afraid of greatness:' 'twas well writ.

48

III,4,1584

'Some are born great,'—

49

III,4,1586

'Some achieve greatness,'—

50

III,4,1588

'And some have greatness thrust upon them.'

51

III,4,1590

'Remember who commended thy yellow stockings,'—

52

III,4,1592

'And wished to see thee cross-gartered.'

53

III,4,1594

'Go to thou art made, if thou desirest to be so;'—

54

III,4,1596

'If not, let me see thee a servant still.'

55

III,4,1609

O, ho! do you come near me now? no worse man than
Sir Toby to look to me! This concurs directly with...

56

III,4,1636

Go off; I discard you: let me enjoy my private: go
off.

57

III,4,1641

Ah, ha! does she so?

58

III,4,1646

Do you know what you say?

59

III,4,1652

How now, mistress!

60

III,4,1659

Sir!

61

III,4,1664

My prayers, minx!

62

III,4,1666

Go, hang yourselves all! you are idle shallow
things: I am not of your element: you shall know...

63

IV,2,2042

[Within] Who calls there?

64

IV,2,2045

Sir Topas, Sir Topas, good Sir Topas, go to my lady.

65

IV,2,2049

Sir Topas, never was man thus wronged: good Sir
Topas, do not think I am mad: they have laid me...

66

IV,2,2056

As hell, Sir Topas.

67

IV,2,2061

I am not mad, Sir Topas: I say to you, this house is dark.

68

IV,2,2065

I say, this house is as dark as ignorance, though
ignorance were as dark as hell; and I say, there...

69

IV,2,2070

That the soul of our grandam might haply inhabit a bird.

70

IV,2,2072

I think nobly of the soul, and no way approve his opinion.

71

IV,2,2077

Sir Topas, Sir Topas!

72

IV,2,2092

Fool!

73

IV,2,2094

Fool!

74

IV,2,2096

Fool, I say!

75

IV,2,2098

Good fool, as ever thou wilt deserve well at my
hand, help me to a candle, and pen, ink and paper:...

76

IV,2,2103

Ay, good fool.

77

IV,2,2105

Fool, there was never a man so notoriously abused: I
am as well in my wits, fool, as thou art.

78

IV,2,2109

They have here propertied me; keep me in darkness,
send ministers to me, asses, and do all they can to...

79

IV,2,2116

Sir Topas!

80

IV,2,2120

Fool, fool, fool, I say!

81

IV,2,2123

Good fool, help me to some light and some paper: I
tell thee, I am as well in my wits as any man in Illyria.

82

IV,2,2126

By this hand, I am. Good fool, some ink, paper and
light; and convey what I will set down to my lady:...

83

IV,2,2132

Believe me, I am not; I tell thee true.

84

IV,2,2135

Fool, I'll requite it in the highest degree: I
prithee, be gone.

85

V,1,2539

Madam, you have done me wrong,
Notorious wrong.

86

V,1,2542

Lady, you have. Pray you, peruse that letter.
You must not now deny it is your hand:...

87

V,1,2590

I'll be revenged on the whole pack of you.

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